Captain Mordecai Miller Hord, Sr

Male 1721 - 1789  (68 years)


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  • Name Captain Mordecai Miller Hord, Sr 
    Title Captain 
    Suffix Sr 
    Born 1721  Brandywine, Caroline County, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 29 Jun 1789  Stanleytown, Henry County, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried Hord Family Cemetery Stanleytown, Henry County, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I272008482905  Eby/Aebi and Bernethy Family
    Last Modified 21 Jan 2016 

    Father John Hord, I,   b. 29 Dec 1664, Ewell, Surrey, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Between 1712-1749, Caroline County, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 84 years) 
    Mother Elizabeth Jane Redd,   b. Unknown,   d. Abt 1747 
    Married 1698  Ewell, Surrey, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F246729425885  Group Sheet

    Family Sarah Carr,   b. Abt 1732, Spotsylvania County, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married Abt 1752  Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
    +1. Stanwix Hord,   b. Abt 1760, Louisa County, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 23 Aug 1828, Overton County, Tennessee Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 68 years)
    +2. Mary Hord,   b. Abt 1763,   d. Bef 13 Oct 1804  (Age ~ 41 years)
    +3. William Hord, Sr,   b. 5 Aug 1764, Louisa County, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 15 May 1825, Rogersville, Hawkins County, Tennessee Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 60 years)
    +4. Jane Hord,   b. Abt 1765, Hordsville, Henry County, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 12 Oct 1794, Monroe, Overton County, Tennessee Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 29 years)
    +5. John Hord,   b. 1 Dec 1766, Henry County, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 30 Aug 1803, Henry County, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 36 years)
     6. Mordacai Hord,   b. Abt 1770, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 29 Sep 1783, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 13 years)
    Last Modified 20 Jan 2016 
    Family ID F246729425897  Group Sheet

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 1721 - Brandywine, Caroline County, Virginia Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - Abt 1752 - Virginia Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 29 Jun 1789 - Stanleytown, Henry County, Virginia Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - - Hord Family Cemetery Stanleytown, Henry County, Virginia Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Maps 
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend  : Address       : Location       : City/Town       : County/Shire       : State/Province       : Country       : Not Set

  • Notes 

    • Ref: "Genealogy of the Hord Family" by Rev. Arnold Harris Hord, 1898

      States:

      "Mordecai 2 (John 1 ). He went at an early age to reside in Henry County, Virginia, where he died. He married Miss Carr."

    • Ref. "The Hord Family of Virginia" by Alfred Harris Hord

      States:Mordecai Hord is not mentioned in the will of John Herd (1) but Robert Hord in his manuscript (1838) states that Mordecai was son of John Hord (1). Mordecai Hord removed at an early date to the western section of Virginia and became separated from his family. Like Gen. Thomas Sumpter, Gen. Joseph Martin and Colonel Benjamin Cleveland with whom he afterwards became intimate, he had the spirit of the pioneer and the explorer. It was natural under circumstances that his father should not mention him in his will. The important dates of Mordecai Hord's life correspond with those of the other sons of John Hord (1). Mordecai Hord was married in 1752, was a soldier in 1755, and was (as stated by Major John Redd in his "Reminiscences ") too old to serve in the Revolutionary War. He was probably born about 1715, and his will was proved 1789. Thus he was a contemporary of the younger children of John Hord (1) and there is no reason to question the statement of Robert Hord. John Hord (1) mentions in his will "grandson Mordecai Hord " probably a son of Mordecai Hord Senior whose children are mentioned in the following pages.

    • Ref. "The Hord Family of Virginia" by Alfred Harris Hord

      States: Mordecai " Hord (John') was Captain and Wagonmaster * of General Braddock's Army in 1755 (" Virginia Magazine," Vol. VI, p. 342). He is mentioned many times in the " Reminiscences of Major John Redd "

      * There were about two hundred wagons and six hundred baggage horses in the army of General Braddock (" Montcalm and Wolfe," Vol. I, pp. 199, 201, by Francis Parkman). published in the " Virginia Magazine," Vol. VI, p. 342, and Vol. VII, pp. 247, 248; Vol. IX, p. 212. He is mentioned as " Captain Hord " in a letter dated May 9,1769, from General Joseph Martin to Captain William Sims, of Albemarle County. This letter of General Martin describes an expedition on which he made the first settlement at Martin's Station in Powell's Valley. General Martin was accompanied on this journey by Dr. Walker, Captain Mordecai Hord and others.

      November 25, 1767, Mordecai Hord and Thomas Jefferson (afterwards President of the United States) were elected Vestrymen of Fredericksville Parish, Louisa County, Virginia. Mordecai Hord was also Warden of this parish. He resigned from the Vestry in 1770.

      Mordecai Hord married Sarah Carr, daughter of " Captain William Carr, Gentleman " Justice of Caroline County 1740 and granddaughter of " Thomas Carr, Gentleman " Justice, 1702, and High Sheriff, 1708-1709, of King William County, Virginia, who received a patent (April 25, 1701) for 546 acres of land for transporting eleven persons into the Colony (" William and Mary Quarterly," Vol. VIII, pp. 107, 108, 132).

      December 20, 1752, William Carr, Gent. " for and in consideration of love and affection I have for my son-in- law Mordecai Hord and beloved daughter Sarah " conveys, etc. {'' Virginia Magazine," Vol. XIX, p. 205).

      August 2, 1760, "William Carr, Gent," mentions in his will of this date (proved in Spottsylvania) " son-in-law Mordecai Hord."

      1770, Mordecai Hord moved from Louisa County to Henry County, Virginia, with his brother-in-law, " Col. George Waller, Gent."

      There is a deed in Henry County, Virginia, dated February 22, 1780 (Deed Book, 2, p. 80), in which Martin Key attorney-in-fact for Walter King of Great Britain, conveys 1750 acres of land to Mordecai Hord which the said King agreed by letter to sell Mordecai Hord in 1770.

      March 30, 1780 (Deed Book, 2, p. 90), Mordecai Hord conveys 350 acres of land in Henry County to Patrick Henry, the great Virginia orator (Henry County Records).

      August 30, 1777, Mordecai Hord took the oath of allegiance to the Commonwealth of Virginia (" Virginia Magazine," Vol. IX, p. 17).

      November 26, 1781, Land Warrant was granted to Mordecai Hord, 2383^ acres, No. 9373.

      September 11, 1786, Mordecai Hord signs articles of agreement with William Campbell " by which the said Hord conveys to the said Campbell for 2970 a tract of 900 acres of land, 50 head of horned cattle, 600 bushels of Indian corn, ten thousand weight of tobacco, one wagon, five horses and slaves Margery and her seven children, Lucy, Lotty, Bettsey, Peggy, Peter, Anthony, Mandy, also Milly and Henry, children of Winny, and Randall, son of Bess " (Henry County Records).

      Mordecai Hord is described by Major John Redd in the latter's " Reminiscences " (" Virginia Magazine," Vol. VI, p. 342) as being "very fleshy, weighing 200 lbs. or more,of fine personal appearance and strong natural mind." Mordecai Hord died at his seat " Hordsville," Henry County, Va. His will is dated September 29, 1783, and was proved in Henry County, Va., June 29, 1789. The inventory of his estate shows that his personal property amounted to $9045.03; he had 32 slaves, valued at $175 each. The following are the names of some of these slaves (the names of all of them are not given) :
      Ailse, Nance, Hannah, John, Phill, Charles, Bob, George, Jenny, Lanty, Ingram, Winny, Agge, Milly, Harry, Randolph, Madge, Luce, Bett, Peg, Peter, Anthony,Margery,George,Kate, Phillis, a girl; Robin, a boy; Bess, an old woman. Besides the valuable property on which he lived and which his inventory shows was abundantly stocked with horses and cattle, Mordecai Hord owned vast tracts of land in Powell's Valley, or " on the Western Waters," as he refers to them in his will. His executors were his " friends (Governor) Patrick Henry, Col. George Waller, his brother-in-law and Edmund Lyne," whom he desires to educate his son " Mordecai Jr. in the genteelest manner by sending him to the Academy in Prince Edward County where he should be taught the languages and sciences till nineteen years of age when he is to be put to the study of the law or physic till twenty-one."

      Mordecai Herd's seat in Henry County was named "Hordsville."

      Mordecai Hord mentions in his will sons William, John, Stanwix, Mordecai, Jr., daughters Jane Fleming, wife of John Fleming, and Mary Hord.




    • Death Date from the Reminiscences of Western Virginia, 1770-1790 by John Redd Page 342Published in the Virgina Historical Magazine. Vol. 6, No. 4, Apr., 1899 [As stated in the introduction to these reminiscences, this paper by Major John Redd, is in two parts.



      Mordecai Hoard, a native of Caroline County, and son of John Hord (Will of John list him as Grandson rs.) the emmigrant of the family to Virginia, removed to southwest Virginia. He married Miss Carr. The son Col. William Hord was a son of the Tennessee Legislature from Hawkins County.

      Mordecai Hoard was a wagon master in Gen. Braddocks defeat in 1755.Made an entry in 1775 on Indian Creek 4 miles below Brice Martin's territory He made his home at Martin's Station where he where he occasionally slept, which was ten miles from where he made his entry.

      He died in the Smith's River Henry County, Virginia where he had lived for many years.He was very fleshy weighed 200 lb. or more, fine personal appearance, strong natural mind. He raised six children four sons and two daughters all of whom have been dead for many years. Col. William Hord, son of Mordecai, Col. William Hoard immigrated to Tennessee many years ago. has a son Eldridge Hoard now living in Tennessee, near the Hoston and six or eight miles from King's Fort. Mordecia Hoard died in 1786. took no part in the Revolutionary War because of his age. He was not called Col, .must be the son William you are referring to.

      State: VA Country: USA



      DB 6 pgs 5, 6 19 Feb. 1780 Proved: Court 25 Sept 1797An agreement between Mordecai Hord and Patrick Henry both of Henry County. Mordecai Hord and Patrick Henry 350 acres on the Smith River where Gardner lives and passes all his right without warranty but agrees that as soon as he obtains a right from Martin Key he will execute a deed for the said land to Patrick Henry in fee simple. Patrick Henry gives for the said land all his right to a plot and certificate for 2,000 acres of land on the Ohio River near the Great Bone, surveyed by James Douglass and warrant from the Land Office also One thousand pounds more in current money and is to pay Hord one thousand pounds more for damages if Hord fails to obtain a right to the land from Martin Key but said One thousand pounds forfeit to be discharged by payment of gold or silver at rates of 1 for 20 pounds in paper. Vis: Fifty pounds hard money for the said One thousand pounds. Patrick Henry is to have immediate use of the land, 400 acres of land out of the 2,000 acres to go to Col. William Christian.Wit: Henry Lyne Mordecai HordMarvel Nash P. Henry



      Db 6 pg 81 26 Mar 1798Alexander Hunter of the Parish of Patrick and County of Henry, Planter, for the love and affection that he bears unto his daughter Ruth Hord the land on Smith River 450 acres wheron John Hord now lives, land that MORD. HORD left his son John Hord and also land he bought of his brother William Hord. This is including all improvements.Wit: none Alexander Hunterit being



      The Virginia Genealogist pgs 205-207 MORDECAI HORD, Estate account, 1789-May 1790Payments made to Jessee Maupin, Jas. Baker, Eusebus Stone, Thomas Cunningham, Junor Meredith, William Thompson, Stanwix Hord, John Hord, William Martin (for services in South Carolina), John Redd, Wm. Elkins (waggoner), Peter Rickman, Joseph Phifer, Henry Lyne (for Mathew Mullins), Wm. Chandler, George Penn, Samuel Crutcher, Thomas Jett, Wm. Hord"s expenses to Powell Valley. Receipts from Stanwix Hord a legatee, William Hord, Jno. Hord, Tos. Jett, Peter Rickman, Henry Lyne. 15 May 1791. Examined by John Salmon, James Anthony and Henry Lyne. (No date of recording.)



      Mordecai Hord was a participant in the French and Indian War (1755-1762); Wagon Master (equivalent to the rank of Quartermaster at the present time) of General Braddock's Army (1755); probably naming his second son in commemoration of the stirring events of the war and of several important treaties concluded with the Six Nations of Indians at Fort Stanwix on the Mohawk. He was a Warden and Vestryman (1767) of Fredericksville Parish, Louisa County, Virginia, with Thomas Jefferson (afterwards President of the United States). In 1770 he moved to Henry County, where he was a neighbor and intimate friend of Patrick Henry, the great orator and Governor of Virginia. In 1780 he sold land to Patrick Henry for five thousand pounds current money of Virginia. Land warrants, possibly for services in the French and Indian War, were granted to Mordecai Hord, entitling him to large tracts in Bedford County, Virginia (see Bedford Records). "He took no part in the Revolutionary War on account of his age, although he was a great patriot. He was very fleshy, weighed two hundred pounds or more, was of fine personal appearance and had a strong natural mind" (see "Reminiscences" by Major John Redd in the "Virginia Historical Society Magazine," Vol. VI, p. 342). For reference to several journeys made by him to Kentucky see also the same magazine, Vol. VII, pp. 247, 248, 404, and Vol. IX, p. 212. He is mentioned in a list of persons who renounced their allegiance to Great Britain and took the oath of allegiance to the Commonwealth of Virginia before August 30, 1777 (see "Virginia Magazine," Vol. IX, p. 17). The Inventory of his estate (October 6, 1789) made after his death indicates that he was a very wealthy man for his time. He owned more than thirty-two negroes, valued at $175 each. His personal property (not including lands) amounted to $9045.03. Among articles mentioned in his Inventory are: Bible, $10; Shakespeare's and Pope's writings, Dictionary, desk, $25; cupboard, $15; brass scales, $15; cash on hand, $10000. He indulged in "blue broad cloth," worth $2.50 per yard, and his servants wore "cotton cloth," worth fifty cents per yard. The Inventory also shows "two kadders" (probably tea caddies), one pair spaniels, one "Search" (possibly a lantern), one table "server," silver spoons, silver watch and neck clasp, gold sleeve buttons, two jacks or pot racks. He died in 1789.



      His will was made September 29, 1783, just as he was about to set out on a perilous journey to Powell's Valley. It was proved in Henry County, Virginia, June 29, 1789. His executors are to divide all his lands on the "Western Waters" into four parts and give them to sons Stanwix, William, John and Mordecai. To son Mordecai one-fourth part of lands on "Western Waters, the land, houses and plantation where he (Mordecai, senior) was then living on Smith's River, in Henry County, also six negroes: Lett, Len, Else, Wann, Anthony and Sirus; also two hundred and fifty pounds specie; one-third of all his household furniture, cattle, horses, hogsi sheep and crops. He appoints son William and brother.in-law, George WaIler, guardians of Mordecai, junior, whom he desires to be "educated in the genteelest manner by sending him to the Academy in Prince Edward County or to any other seminary of learning, that he may be taught the languages and sciences till he is nineteen years old at which time he is to be put to the study of the Law or Physic." To daughter, Mary Hord, five negroes: Agg, Winn, Randolph, Milly and Bess, also one hundred pounds current money,' also twenty choice cows, ten choice ewes and the best horse or mare in the stable, and one-fifth part of his furniture, money, debts, cattle, horses, sheep, crops, etc To son Stanwix, three negroes: George, Marge and Sail; a fourth part of land on "Western Waters," a fifth part of furniture, cattle, etc. To son William, three negroes: Tom, Frank and Lem; a fourth part of lands on "Western Waters" and an equal share of property as other children. To son John, negroes: Kate, Charles, Bett and Pegg; a fourth part of land on "Western Waters," etc. To daughter, Jane Fleming, three negroes: Rachel, Mirna and Peter; land on "Western Waters, furniture, cattle, etc. His executors were his "friends Patrick Henry, Edmund Lyne," his brother-in-law, "Colonel George Wailer, Gentleman," and son, William Hord. Mordecai Hord's tomb may still be seen at "Hordsville" in Henry County, Virginia, where his wife and several of his family are also buried. The facsimile of his signature is here given.



      Wikipedia Martinsville, Henry, VirginiaOther notable early settlers of Henry County include Colonel George Waller,[5] Captain George Hairston and Major John Redd,[6] all of whom were present at the surrender of General Cornwallis at Yorktown; Col. Abraham Penn, a native of Amherst County, Virginia, who led his Henry County militia troops with the intention of joining General Nathaniel Greene at the Battle of Guilford Courthouse during the Revolutionary War;[7] and Brigadier General Joseph Martin, for whom Martinsville is named.[8] Also prominent were Mordecai Hord, a native of Louisa County and prominent early explorer, who lived on his plantation called Hordsville;[9] and Col. John Dillard, born in Amherst County, Virginia in 1751, wounded at the Battle of Princeton during the Revolution, and later a member of the Committee of Safety and a colonel in the Virginia forces.



      English: Hordsville, a plantation house of the Hairston family, was built circa 1836 near Fieldale, Henry County, Virginia. The house takes its name from the first owner of the land, Col. Mordecai Hord, Revolutionary War officer, planter and Virginia pioneer Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. A copy of the license is included in the section entitled GNU Free Documentation License. http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.htmlGFDLGNU Free Documentation Licensetruetrue Hordsville Plantation

      Hordsville was built in 1836 by George Hairston and Louisa Hardyman Hairston. He was the son of George Hairston and Elizabeth Perkins (Letcher) Hairston. It is located near Stanleytown on the old Carolina Post Road between Bassett and Fieldale and is copy of a house George had seen in Richmond. It was built of brick made by slaves on the plantation and iron from the Hairston Foundry located where Fairystone Park is now. The land was purchased from John Hord, an Englishman, who is buried on a knoll, which can be seen from the front of the house. Near the house is the old cemetery referred to as "God's Acre" where many of the Hairston and related families are buried.


    • ---Mordecai was a large landowner and friend of Patrick Henry.
      ---22 Feb 1780; Henry Co., Virginia, USA 20. Martin Key, attorney in fact for Walter King of Great Britain, conveys 1,750 acres of land to Mordecai Hord which the said King agreed by letter to sell to Hord in 1770.
      ---Will; 1783-29 Sep 1789; Henry Co., Virginia. Mordecai Hord lived at Hordsville and his will is dated 29
      September 1789. The inventory showed his personal property amounted to $9,045.03 and he had 37 slaves valued at $175 each. He mentions sons - William, John, Stanwix, Mordecai, Jr.; daughters - Jane Fleming and Mary Hord.

    • From "The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography Vol 9:

      The Carr Family Among " Notes and Queries " of Vol. II, No. 2, October, 1894, p. 225, it is stated that in 1751 Wm. Carr, of Spotsylvania county, Gent., made a deed to his son-in-law, Mordecai Miller and daughter Sarah, his wife. This is a mistake. The deed is to son-inlaw Mordica Miller Hord and beloved daughter Sarah, and is dated 2oth day of December, 1752, recorded in Louisa county clerk's office.

      Mordecai Hord and his wife, Sarah, lie buried on their old homestead, "Hordsville," six miles from here on the west bank of Smith's river.

      Colonel George Waller, Gent., married Ann Winston Carr, a sister of Sarah (Carr) Hord, it is presumed, and the two families it is thought, came here from Spotsylvania county, about 177o, bought land together, and lived and died near neighbours.

      Any information concerning George Waller, born about 1735 or 40, or Ann Winston Carr, his wife, born about the same date, will be thankfully received and amply rewarded.

      C. B. Bryant, Martinsville, Pa.
    • May 24, 2015

      As you are aware I have always been intrigued and puzzled by how Mordecai fits into the first Hord family. Three important sources state that "the Mordecai" that married Sarah Carr in 1752 and eventually emigrated to Henry County, Virginia was the son of John Hord I and Elizabeth Jane Hord. I am not ready to disbelieve these sources yet, however, in light of other evidence I am not too sure this is true anymore. As you know, in his will John Hord I only mentioned two of his many grandchildren, Mordecai Hord and William Hord II, the oldest son of William Hord I. It also stated that William Hord I was granted the use of Shady Grove for one year after the death of his father after which Ambrose inherited the property. More than likely this was because William Hord I was living at or near Shady Grove with other younger grand children and needed a place to live while he built a home on the property that his father bequeathed him in King George County and that Ambrose did not have any children. Also, we know that one of the Caroline County records that avoided destruction during the Civil War refers to a Mordecai Hord as a "Keeper of the Roads" in 1779-1780. Another key piece of information is an indenture by William Carr, father of Sarah Carr who was the wife of Mordecai, granting them property in Louisa County in 1752. This indenture refers to Mordecai as "Mordecai Miller Hord". It is difficult to believe that this was a mistake. Finally, other information that enters into the puzzle is that Thomas Hord I, Gentleman and William Hord I both married women with the previous name "Miller".


      These are facts, so consider this possibility. The Mordecai mentioned in the will of John Hord I was actually a "step" grandson, Mordecai Miller Hord, who was more than likely a son of William Hord I's wife by a previous marriage. Before his father died William Hord I likely lived at or close to Shady Grove so his grandson William II and Mordecai Miller Hord who would have been about the same age possibly saw John Hord I frequently causing him to become more attached to them than his other grandchildren whom he didn't see as often. These two grand children would have been approaching adulthood when John Hord I died in 1749 so leaving them a slave made reasonable sense. When the step grandson son Mordecai Miller Hord, who was probably born around 1727, became an adult he married Sarah Carr in 1752 and eventually they moved to Henry County. Meanwhile, John Hord I and his wife did have a son that they named Mordecai about 1720 and this is probably the Mordecai Hord mentioned in the Caroline County records as "Keeper of the Roads". Naturally this is pure speculation but it works time wise and is a very possible scenario from my perspective. The more I think about it, I would probably be willing to wager Duane's farm on this story. Mystery solve? What do you think?


      Phil Mullen
      Angels Camp, CA
    • From Phil Mullen in FAG:

      Mordecai Hord (see the note below) was one of ten children born c1721 to John and Jane Hord who immigrated from England to Virginia about 1702 and established a plantation in Caroline County, Virginia called Shady Grove. Mordecai married Sarah Winston Carr (c1735-1782) in 1752; they settled in Louisa County, Virginia. In 1755, Mordecai served as a Captain under English General Joseph Braddock in the French and Indian War. He was a Wagon Master. In 1767, Mordecai was the Warden and Vestryman at the Fredericksville Parish in Albemarle County, Virginia. In 1770, he and his brother-in-law, George Waller, moved their families to Henry County, Virginia where they purchased adjacent properties and established large plantations. The Hord plantation, approximately 3000 acres, was located west of the Smith River between Stanleytown and Fieldale, Virginia. Mordecai was very active in frontier exploration at Powell Valley and beyond. He traveled there with General Joseph Martin and John Redd and helped establish Martin Station. Mordecai and his wife, Sarah, had six children: Stanwix, William, John, Jane, Mary and Mordecai Jr. He died in September, 1789 and is buried in his family cemetery. Among his very good friends was Patrick Henry who was an executor of his will.

      Note: Some confusion exists surrounding the unusual name Mordecai in the early Hord Family of Virginia. The Manuscript History of the Hord Family (1838) by Robert Hord and the Reminiscences of Western Virginia by John Redd which are historical records containing information about the early Hord family both state that the Mordecai Hord mentioned in this biography was the son of John and Elizabeth Hord of Essex and Caroline County who immigrated to Virginia from England around 1702. Robert Hord was a great grandson of John Hord of Essex and Caroline County and John Redd was a nephew-in-law, companion and neighbor of Mordecai Hord named in this biography. However, the will of John Hord of Essex in 1747 mentions a grandson named Mordecai Hord without identifying his parents; the will does not mention a son by the name, Mordecai. The name Mordecai does not appear among the names of the grandchildren of John Hord of Essex and Caroline counties. Also, historical records in Caroline County mention an individual named Mordecai Hord that was an "Overseer of Roads" in that county in 1789 and 1780. Who this Hord family member was related to is unknown. Reverend Arnold Harris Hord in his book "The Hord Family of Virginia" 1915 speculated that the grandson named Mordecai mentioned in the will of John Hord of Essex and Caroline counties was the oldest son of the Mordecai Hord named in this biography however other historical facts make this very unlikely.


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