David G Eby, I

Male 1785 - 1860  (75 years)


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  • Name David G Eby, I 
    Suffix
    Born 23 Feb 1785  Warwick, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 01 Apr 1860  Kitchener (Berlin) (Ebytown), Waterloo, Ontario Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried Ben Eby's First Mennonite Cemetery Kitchener, Waterloo, Ontario Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I523938214  Eby/Aebi and Bernethy Family
    Last Modified 22 Jan 2008 

    Father John Eby,   b. 1745, Earl, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 15 Apr 1815, Lancaster, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 70 years) 
    Mother Mary Gerber,   b. 1745, Lancaster, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married 1770 
    Family ID F509691921  Group Sheet

    Family Elizabeth Bechtel,   b. 05 Mar 1787, Warwick, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 15 Jan 1844, Kitchener (Berlin) (Ebytown), Waterloo, Ontario Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 56 years) 
    Married 10 May 1810  Waterloo County, Ontario Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Joseph B Eby,   b. 25 Mar 1811, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 15 Apr 1884, St Jacobs, Waterloo, Ontario Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 73 years)
     2. Mary Eby,   b. 12 Oct 1812, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 08 Nov 1884, Hawkesville, Waterloo, Ontario Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 72 years)
     3. Magdalena Eby,   b. 12 Dec 1813, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 03 Apr 1886, Washington, Oxford, Ontario Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 72 years)
     4. Jacob Eby,   b. 18 Oct 1815, Waterloo County, Ontario Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 20 Aug 1896, Wakarusa, Elkhart County, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 80 years)
     5. Annie Eby,   b. 18 Feb 1818, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 27 Nov 1848  (Age 30 years)
     6. Elizabeth Eby,   b. 26 Jan 1820, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 19 Jun 1889, Waterloo County, Ontario Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 69 years)
     7. Veronica Eby,   b. 26 Sep 1821, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 15 Jun 1878, Waterloo County, Ontario Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 56 years)
     8. Susannah Eby,   b. 15 Nov 1823, Waterloo County, Ontario Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 22 Jun 1906, Waterloo County, Ontario Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 82 years)
     9. Enoch Eby,   b. 23 Jul 1824, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 24 Aug 1884, Bruce County, Ontario Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 60 years)
     10. David B Eby, II,   b. 26 Aug 1827, Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 19 Mar 1897, Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 69 years)
     11. Elias Eby,   b. 19 Sep 1829, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 01 Mar 1906, Waterloo County, Ontario Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 76 years)
    Last Modified 1 May 2007 
    Family ID F510873498  Group Sheet

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 23 Feb 1785 - Warwick, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 10 May 1810 - Waterloo County, Ontario Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 01 Apr 1860 - Kitchener (Berlin) (Ebytown), Waterloo, Ontario Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - - Ben Eby's First Mennonite Cemetery Kitchener, Waterloo, Ontario Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Maps 
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend  : Address       : Location       : City/Town       : County/Shire       : State/Province       : Country       : Not Set

  • Photos
    David G Eby and Elizabeth Bechtel
    David G Eby and Elizabeth Bechtel
    By the time this photograph was taken the Ebys were no longer on their home farm, formerly located at the northwest corner of today’s Fisher-Hallman Road and Erb Street West in Waterloo. The Eby homestead served as the first place of worship for the David Eby (Waterloo/Erb Street) Mennonite congregation.

    www.mennoniteheritageportrait.ca

    Documents
    David Eby
    David Eby
    Abstract of Title for part Lot 31 German Company Tract, Waterloo Township, and in which the name of David Eby appears. Dated at Berlin, August 26, 1896.

    Headstones
    David Eby:
Hier ruhen/ die Gebeine von/ David Eby/ geboren am 23 Feb. / 1785/ Starb am 1 [sic] April 1860/ Alt. 75 Jahre 1 Mo./ und 9 Tage/ [verse]
    David Eby: Hier ruhen/ die Gebeine von/ David Eby/ geboren am 23 Feb. / 1785/ Starb am 1 [sic] April 1860/ Alt. 75 Jahre 1 Mo./ und 9 Tage/ [verse]
    Personal Collection

  • Notes 
    • Dieter Eby Newman 228

    • David G. Eby immigrated on 21 June 1807 to ON, CA

      1851 Census Waterloo, Waterloo County, Ontario he is living with his son David and Davids wife Lydia.


    • The following from "Pictorial and biographical memoirs of Elkhart and St Joseph Counties, Indiana; together with biographies of many
      prominent men of northern Indiana and of the whole state, both living and dead," Chicago: Goodspeed Bros., 1893, 773 pp.

      "JACOB EBY. The farming class of America and especially of the northern
      tier of states is noted for the degree of intelligence that is possessed among its representatives. Mr. Eby belongs to one of the most progressive of families, and as a tiller of the soil, as well as in other respects, he has endeavored to keep out of old grooves
      and has always favored the adoption of new and improved methods in
      conducting his operations.

      The family originated in Switzerland and were Catholics. A well
      defined tradition in the family relates that at one time there were five brothers of the name living in Switzerland, and all were Catholics, but one who was a Mennonite, which sect was greatly persecuted in Switzerland, and many of its followers found homes
      in the wilderness of Pennsylvania, and among them was the founder of the Eby family in America.

      "The family resided in Pennsylvania for generations and there JOHN EBY,
      the grandfather of the subject of this sketch, followed the calling of a blacksmith, and was married to a Miss LEHMY, their children PETER and DAVID being the only ones of their family that are remembered. DAVID EBY, son of John, was born in Pennsylvania and was but twelve years of age when he started out to make his own way in the world, and in 1807 went to Canada with a party of eleven other men, five
      of which company are remembered: BENJAMIN and SAMUEL EBY, distant relatives of David; JOSEPH SNYDER; PETER and DANIEL ERB, three of whom were married men and the rest single. They were all Mennonites and settled in Waterloo Township, Waterloo Co., Ontario, and the city of Berlin now stands on the ground which was taken by BENJAMIN EBY.

      "DAVID EBY was married there to ELIZABETH BECHTEL, daughter of JOSEPH
      and ELIZABETH (ALLABAUGH) BECHTEL, and after his marriage settled on and cleared up a good farm from the dense timber with which it was covered. It consisted of 330 acres, and besides this he owned 200 acres in the township of Woolwich. Mr. and Mrs. EBY became the parents of eleven children:
      JOSEPH, MARY, MATTIE, JACOB, ANNIE, ELIZABETH, FRONICA, SUSAN, DAVID,
      ELIAS and ENOCH. "JOSEPH BECTEL [sic], the maternal grandfather of the subject of this sketch, was a Mennonite preacher; BENJAMIN EBY was a bishop in the church, and SAMUEL EBY was an elder, and together they established a church in their settlement which flourished, and at the death of BENJAMIN EBY, about 185_ there were 1100 members, nearly all of whom were converted through the instrumentality of these humble followers of Christ.

      "DAVID EBY died at the age of seventy-five years in March, 1855, leaving a goodly property and an unsullied name as a heritage to his children, before whom he always set a good example, and to whom he was a kind and faithful father. His farm is now very valuable, as it is close to the city of Berlin, and is owned by David Eby and his sons and is valued at above $100,000.

      "JACOB EBY was born on the old homestead in Canada, October 18, 181_, and owing to the primitive condition of the country during his youth, he received a very limited education, his studies being mainly pursued of evenings by the older______
      Like many of the early pioneers he was handy with tools and.. {skipping
      a colorful story about a very large bear in the fields)... ...Mr. Eby waited for it, and at the right moment attacked it with knife
      and club and with the help of the dog, which was large and strong, killed it. On another occasion, when he was going into the woods to split posts, he saw a full-grown wolf asleep in a fallen tree top, whereupon he threw his ax, struck it fairly and killed it.

      "April 7, 1840, he was married to POLLY BINGAMAN, a daughter of JOHN and HANNAH (BERKEY) BINGAMAN, her father being of Pennsylvania Dutch stock. He cleared a good farm of 100 acres and was accidentally killed by the falling of a large limb from a burning tree when about seventy years of age. He and his wife were Mennonites and the parents of the following family:
      JUDITH, ESTHER, SUSANNAH, HANNAH, EUNICE, CATHERINE, MARY, MAGDALINE, JOHN, SALLIE and ISAAC.

      "Eight children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Eby: ENOCH, SIMON, who died at the age of twenty-one years; SETH; CYRUS; JACOB; JOHN; JOSEPH and NOAH.

      "After his marriage Mr. Eby settled seven miles north of his father's
      homestead on a 200-acre tract of wild land for which he paid $750, and here he lived and worked hard until 1860, when he came to St Joseph county, Ind., and bought 280 acres of land, 80 of which were cleared. He has improved the remainder by thrift and perseverance and added to his original purchase until he at one time owned 700 acres, all of which he has given to his children, except 280 acres.

      "He and his wife have been life-long members of the Mennonite church, but have liberally assisted other churches with their means. He contributed money toward building two Mennonite Churches in his vicinity, as well as for the Catholic and Baptist Churches of Mishawaka. He is generous and high minded, broad in his views and well posted on all topics. His sons are all settled near him and are in good circumstances:
      ENOCH, who is farming near Tippecanoe Lake, Ind., married KEZIA WENDY
      [sic] and has three children;
      SETH farms near Bangor, Mich., married HANNAH HERRINGTON and has
      two children;
      CYRUS is a farmer near the old home, is married to ANNIE WENGER and
      has seven children;
      JACOB also farms near home, is married to ELIZABETH WENGER and
      has eight children;
      JOHN is married to HARRIET WEAVER and has two children;
      NOAH farms, is married to LAURA MOON, by whom he has two children;
      JOSEPH is at home.

      "Mr. and Mrs. Eby have two great-grandchildren. Their granddaughter,
      HANNAH EBY, daughter of Enoch, married EMMET GORDEY and has one son, ALVA ALLEN. JOHN EBY, a grandson, married MARY EBY and has a son, WALTER. "Mr. Eby is a stanch Republican."







    • The Ebys of Erb's Road from mennoniteheritageportrait.com

      David Eby was a young Mennonite bachelor who arrived at the German Company Tract in 1807, in the same party that included Joseph Schneider (whose pioneer home has been preserved as Joseph Schneider Haus Museum, Kitchener). Not much else is known about David. According to an account written by Ezra Eby in his 1890s work, A Biographical History of Waterloo Township, soon after David arrived he was clearing land for Peter Erb north of what is now the Bridgeport section of Kitchener.

      David married Elizabeth Bechtel in 1810, and the Ebys had begun a family by the time they established their farmstead, possibly in the 1820s, where Erb Street West and Fisher-Hallman Road intersect today in the City of Waterloo (a shopping center occupies the site). The Eby farm was about two miles west of Abraham Erb's mill, and Erb Street/Erb's Road take their name from the mill (of the original German Company Tract purchasers, about forty percent were Erbs). Elizabeth Bloomfield, in her book Waterloo Township through Two Centuries, notes that about half of the 190-acre Eby farm was under cultivation in 1831.

      By the mid-1830s, the Ebys had enough Mennonite neighbours for church leaders to schedule worship at the "David Eby" locality once a month. Tradition holds that these meetings took place at the Eby farm.

      A Country Meetinghouse

      A new brick meetinghouse was built in 1851 on the Ebys' land, across the intersection from their farm. Erb Street Mennonite Cemetery occupies the site in 2009. Worship at the new meetinghouse continued at the same monthly frequency as before, and the local Mennonite families worshipped elsewhere in the off-weeks. The Mennonite conference published a preaching rotation schedule - a "calendar of appointments" - to indicate in advance the weekly locations of worship and communion services, and other significant dates on the church calendar.

      In 1889, the Mennonites in the Waterloo-Woolwich area split, in part over new practices that had gained a foothold in many Mennonite churches, such as Sunday school and prayer meetings. The two separate streams of the church that resulted from the split were the "Old Order Mennonites" and the Mennonite Conference of Ontario, or "Conference Mennonites". The conference group retained the David Eby meetinghouse.

      A Church in Town

      By 1900, many of the Conference Mennonite communities around Waterloo County were behaving more like individual congregations and less like a single body of believers. New ideas had always influenced the Mennonite churches in North America wherever Mennonites lived in close contact with other denominations. At the end of the 1800s, having broadened their awareness beyond the Mennonite experience through a variety of channels, young Mennonites were especially attuned to novel religious practices, and to new ways of expressing their faith. New programs and events, such as Sunday school, young people's meetings, and evangelistic meetings, seem to have fed a desire for individual, even public, opportunities to explore one's personal faith.

      The movement away from the more traditional cultural mores and worship modes was at least a contributing factor in the David Eby congregation's decision to build a new church - the decision of a two-thirds majority that was achieved by the slimmest of margins: one vote.

      In the years between the 1889 division and the 1930s, many of the Conference Mennonite meetinghouses in Waterloo County, such as the David Eby meetinghouse, were replaced by church buildings. Though relatively modest compared to Catholic, Anglican, or Lutheran churches of the same period, the new buildings were a significant departure from the deliberate plainness of the traditional Mennonite meetinghouses that preceded them.

      David Eby congregation members Samuel S. and Elizabeth Snider donated just under an acre of land at the western edge of Waterloo for a new church building in 1902. Charles Moogk, who also designed St. Louis Roman Catholic Church in Waterloo, the Waterloo Carnegie Library, and the old Waterloo Town Hall, designed the plan. The church was wired for electricity supplied by William Snider's flour mill at Erb and King Streets. Like most of the new Mennonite churches of that era, it had a basement - something most meetinghouses did not have. The Sunday school met in the basement.

      The relocation into town, closer to "the world", could be seen as demonstrating in physical movement something of the spiritual movement of the larger church during that period - a time newly energized by evangelism, missions, and outreach. The David Eby congregation that began as entirely rural was now the Waterloo congregation whose membership rolls included "town" families.

      When the new Waterloo Mennonite Church was completed, a prominent "Old Order" Mennonite observed, "If a steeple and a cross were on top it would resemble a Catholic Church more than a Mennonite meetinghouse!"

      The original 1902 church building still serves the congregation in 2009. Major renovations and additions were completed in 1950, 1980, and 2002, but the sanctuary has retained much of its heritage finish and furnishings.
    • Article found:

      The Erb Street Mennonite Cemetery lies at the corner of Erb Street and Fischer-Hallman Road in the city of Waterloo, Ontario. The land for the original church on this site was donated in 1851 by David Eby senior. A red brick church was erected, which ws know as the David Eby Church. The surrounding churchyard was used for burials. At the time, this church was well out of Waterloo Village proper and was perhaps not as convenient as might be for the local Mennonite church, but it also served members of the congregration in the surrounding parts of Waterloo Township.

      In 1902 the Eby church as replaced by a new Erb Street building at a new located closer to town. This building, much enlarged, is an important part of the religious life of Waterloo to this day. The old churchyard remained as the cemetery for the new church, although separated from the building. As Waterloo has expanded, especially in the 1970's and 1980's, the city has come out to surround the small cemetery, which is now crowed by suburbia. The church and its congregation and no longer rural.

      The cemetery is well kept and a reminder of the Mennonite origins and traditions of the early days of Waterloo. January 1991.


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