Private Pulaski Barnes Broughton

Male 1842 - 1920  (77 years)


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  • Name Private Pulaski Barnes Broughton 
    Title Private 
    Born 12 Jul 1842  Conneaut, Crawford County, Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 04 May 1920  Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried Lakewood Cemetery Minneapolis, Hennepin, Minnesota Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I554963307  Eby/Aebi and Bernethy Family
    Last Modified 15 Sep 2013 

    Father Michael II Broughton,   b. 20 Aug 1784, Burlington, Chittenden County, Vermont Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 02 Sep 1859, Beaver, Crawford County, Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 75 years) 
    Mother Sarah Gillam,   b. 14 Jun 1802, Ottawa, Ontario Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 30 Dec 1885, Ashtabula County, Ohio Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 83 years) 
    Married 16 Aug 1827  Silver Lake, Wyoming County, New York Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F523167137  Group Sheet

    Family Hester Welch,   b. Abt 1843, Crawford County, Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 20 Dec 1917, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 74 years) 
    Married 26 Oct 1865  Conneaut, Crawford County, Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Frank Welch Broughton,   b. 03 Dec 1866, Redwood Falls, Redwood County, Minnesota Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Bef Jun 1870, Redwood Falls, Redwood County, Minnesota Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 3 years)
     2. Fred Lavern Broughton,   b. 26 Oct 1868, Redwood Falls, Redwood County, Minnesota Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Bef 1870, Redwood Falls, Redwood County, Minnesota Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 1 years)
     3. Charlotte May Broughton,   b. 22 Aug 1870, Redwood County, Minnesota Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 27 Mar 1931, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 60 years)
     4. Ellie Iania Broughton,   b. 19 Jan 1874, Minnesota Find all individuals with events at this location
     5. Burk Welch Broughton,   b. 17 Jul 1879, Minnesota Find all individuals with events at this location
     6. Walter Edward Broughton,   b. 17 Jul 1879
     7. Anna Louise Broughton,   b. 07 Oct 1884, Minnesota Find all individuals with events at this location
    Last Modified 15 Sep 2013 
    Family ID F523224580  Group Sheet

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 12 Jul 1842 - Conneaut, Crawford County, Pennsylvania Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 26 Oct 1865 - Conneaut, Crawford County, Pennsylvania Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 04 May 1920 - Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - - Lakewood Cemetery Minneapolis, Hennepin, Minnesota Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Maps 
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend  : Address       : Location       : City/Town       : County/Shire       : State/Province       : Country       : Not Set

  • Documents
    Pulaski B Broughton Pension Request
    Pulaski B Broughton Pension Request
    From Ancestry

  • Notes 
    • Walter Broughton

      Notes for PULASKI BARNES BROUGHTON:
      Enlisted in the Union Army on 21 Apr 1861. Served as a Private in D Compant, Erie Reg., PA. Mustered out on 21 Jul 1861. Reenlisted at age 19 on 14 Aug 1861. Served as a Private in A Company, 29th Inf. Reg., OH. Mustered out on 9 Sep 1864.


      More About PULASKI BARNES BROUGHTON:
      Burial: May-1920, Sec. 22, Lot 295, Lakewood Cem., Minneapolis, MN
      Cause of Death: influenza
      Medical Information: Dark Completion, Black Eyes, Brown Hair
      Military service: Bet. Apr - Jul-1861, Priv., D Co. Erie Reg., PA8
      Occupation: Bet. 1892 - 1893, Press Brick
      Residence: Bet. 1892 - 1893, house 5, Chautauqua Place, Bradford, PA
    • He died, in what was called "The Soldiers Home." The history of Minnesota's Veterans Homes begins shortly after the Civil War. Because of the devastation brought on by that conflict, there was a growing conviction that provisions should be made for the care of the nation's veterans. The Minnesota legislature authorized the establishment of the Minnesota Soldiers' Home in 1887, as a "reward to the brave and deserving," and a Board of Trustees was established to manage the facility. By 1888, construction at the site of the current Minneapolis Veterans Home had begun; and by 1911, five men's cottages and one women's cottage had been built, along with several support services buildings (infirmary, dining hall, etc.).

      The mission of soldiers' homes, as they were contemplated in the last third of the nineteenth century, was to create beautiful, landscaped communities for veterans - havens of rest for veterans' later years. These homes were not primarily designed to be medical facilities; rather, they were seen as monuments to the contributions of veterans. In fact, it was not until World War I that medical care was provided in soldiers' homes, and even then it was of secondary consideration.

      The view that soldiers' homes were rest homes persevered in Minnesota until the 1960s. In 1968, for example, the Minneapolis Soldiers' Home was licensed for 56 nursing care beds and 375 boarding care beds, the latter of which represented primarily custodial (non medical) care. By the late 1960s, however, the Soldiers' Home Board of Trustees, along with others, recognized a growing need for making the health care needs of veterans a primary concern of the Home. The Soldiers' Home had been operated, since its creation, in a military atmosphere: the head of the facility was appointed as Commandant, and services and discipline were meted out in a quasi- military fashion. While the Board of Trustees began to recognize the growing health care needs of the veteran population, and while there were increased efforts to provide medical and psychiatric care, the Home still had not made the conversion from rest haven to health care facility.

      The 1970s were a time of change and growth for the Soldiers Home. In 1972, a new nursing care facility was constructed on the Minneapolis campus; another one was built in 1980. Additionally, in 1978, the old state hospital in Hastings was converted into a domiciliary residence for veterans. As a result of the new construction in Minneapolis and the conversion of the Hastings facility, the Homes had 250 nursing care beds at Minneapolis, 250 domiciliary beds at Minneapolis and 200 domiciliary beds at Hastings. Along with this growth, the Board of Trustees was abolished, and the administration of the Soldiers' Home became a responsibility of the state Commissioner of Veterans Affairs in an effort to consolidate all matters pertaining to veterans in one department.

      In 1988, the legislature reorganized and separated the Veterans Homes from the Department of Veterans Affairs. The Veterans Homes Board of Directors was established, consisting of nine members appointed by the governor. The Board was charged with restructuring the homes along the lines of the medical model of operations and turning them into high quality health care facilities while also taking into consideration the special needs of the veteran population. To accomplish this dual focus, the Board's membership consists of representatives from the health care field and Veterans organizations. The Board has assured that the Homes are operated according to stated goals and standardized practices, policies and procedures, that residents' rights are recognized and respected, and that a high quality of life is maintained for the veterans who are residents of the Homes. The agency itself is managed by an Executive Director, who is responsible for ensuring that the Board's vision for the agency, mission, and goals, are properly operationalized. Each Veterans Home is managed by an administrator, who reports directly to the Executive Director. All of the facilities have medical directors, directors of nursing, and nursing, social services, financial and other staff appropriate to the needs and levels of care of their veteran residents.

      There are now five Veterans Homes operating in Minnesota, located in Minneapolis, Hastings, Silver Bay, Luverne and Fergus Falls (the latter two began operations in 1994 and 1998, respectively). The breakdown of the beds is as follows: Minneapolis, 346 skilled nursing care beds and 77 domiciliary beds; Hastings, 200 domiciliary beds; Silver Bay, 89 skilled nursing care beds; Luverne, 85 skilled nursing care beds, and Fergus Falls, 85 skilled nursing care beds.

      From both an historical perspective and a current one, it is clear that the Minnesota Veterans Homes would not be in operation without the support of the veteran community in Minnesota. There are approximately 50 veterans organizations and their affiliates in Minnesota that play an important role in shaping the veteran community within the Veterans Homes, by noting the needs of their fellow veterans and enriching the general quality of life and environment at the Veterans Homes. These organizations serve in part as a bridge between the concepts of the Veterans Homes as medical facilities and the Veterans Homes as special places of recognition for the service the veteran residents have provided for their country.

      The veteran community plays four essential roles relative to veteran residents of the Homes: those of promoters, advocates, watchdogs/protectors, and donors. First, the veteran community has always been very supportive of the Veterans Homes, and keeps the veteran population at large aware of the availability of services at the Homes. Many organizations allow the agency to participate in their events and conventions, giving the agency the opportunity to promote the Homes at such events. The organizations themselves also promote the agency and the Homes by spreading the word about them and providing positive reinforcement to the commitment of the agency in meeting veterans' needs.

      The advocacy role of the veteran community is also important. Several organizations continuously propose legislative initiatives designed to promote the rights of veterans in Minnesota and at the national level, in order that the needs of their fellow veterans may be met. The veteran community recognizes the special needs of the residents of the Veterans Homes, and advocate on their behalf to assure that those needs are recognized and addressed in the political arena.

      The Veterans community in Minnesota has always played a significant watchdog role on behalf of the residents of the Veterans Homes. From the days of the Grand Army of the Republic and the United Spanish War Veterans to the present, veterans organizations have closely monitored the Veterans Homes, ensuring that the residents of the Homes were receiving quality service and care. Veterans organizations today continue to maintain a close watch on the Homes, to assure that the residents' rights continue to be respected and that the care they receive is of the highest quality.

      Finally, and perhaps most significantly, the veteran community has served in the very generous role of donor relative to the Veterans Homes, and there is no question but that, through the efforts of the community, the quality of life of the residents has been significantly improved. The veteran community has donated equipment to the Homes, including such things as televisions, furnishings and specially equipped transportation vans, which not only improve the quality of life of the Homes' residents, but allow the Homes to provide essential services that could not be otherwise provided without significant cost to the state. These same organizations have also contributed money to the Homes for the special needs of their fellow veterans. The veteran community donates these funds because they recognize that this population has special needs that may not be met through a purely medical model of delivery of services.

      Several veterans organizations sponsor special events on behalf of the residents. They give parties for residents and provide meals, such as annual pheasant dinners. Veterans groups sponsor activities and recreational events for the residents, such as bingo and fishing trips. Finally, the veteran community donates time: they volunteer their time for special events and for daily activities. Veterans groups, affiliate organizations, and families literally devote thousands of hours per month at the Veterans Homes, providing invaluable service and enriching the lives of their comrades and friends.

      The veteran community of Minnesota plays an integral part in the delivery of care to the Veterans Homes residents. There is a strong cultural tradition in this community of remembering and recognizing the efforts and sacrifices of all veterans. By carrying on these traditions, the veteran community continues to meet the needs and safeguard the rights of the veterans residing in the Minnesota Veterans Homes, as well as enriching their lives.
    • U.S., Civil War Soldier Records and Profiles, 1861-1865 about Pulaski B Broughton
      Name: Pulaski B Broughton
      Age at enlistment: 19
      Enlistment Date: 14 Aug 1861
      Rank at enlistment: Private
      State Served: Ohio
      Survived the War?: Yes
      Service Record: Enlisted in Company A, Ohio 29th Infantry Regiment on 14 Aug 1861.Mustered out on 09 Sep 1864.
      Birth Date: abt 1842
      Sources: Official Roster of the Soldiers of the State of Ohio


    • U.S. Civil War Soldiers, 1861-1865 about Pulaski B. Broughton
      Name: Pulaski B. Broughton
      Side: Union
      Regiment State/Origin: Ohio
      Regiment Name: 29 Ohio Infantry
      Regiment Name Expanded: 29th Regiment, Ohio Infantry
      Company: A
      Rank In: Private
      Rank In Expanded: Private
      Rank Out: Private
      Rank Out Expanded: Private
      Film Number: M552 roll 12

    • Minnesota, Death Index, 1908-2002 about Pulaski B Broughton
      Name: Pulaski B Broughton
      Death Date: 4 May 1920
      Death County: Hennepin
      State File Number: 020258
      Certificate Number: 020258
      Certificate Year: 1920
      Record Number: 302645


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