Notes


Tree:  

Matches 101 to 150 of 50,571

      «Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ... 1012» Next»

   Notes   Linked to 
101



David Eby was son of Jacob Eby (1797) and Susannah Myers/Meyer. Peter, Jacob, Samuel, Susannah and John were named in the petition.

Jacob took into his care 3 of 5 children (Peter Susannah and John), (now everybody assumed these 3 children were Jacob and Susannah's children, when in fact they were GRANDCHILDREN!). George Swine (Schwein/Swane) was named guardian of all these children. George's wife Mary Long was sister of Annie Long. Jacob and Susannah eventually moved to Stephenson co., Illinois, taking grandchildren with them. No trace of Peter and Susannah after 1850. John showed up in 1860 census and no trace after that.

Jacob the boy was found living with cousin Jacob (1806) (wife Charlotte). This Jacob is son of Henry Eby and Elizabeth Rachel Rhoads. Henry was brother of Jacob (1797). A review of death certificates, showed Jacob's middle name was Q., per wife's death certificate.

Samuel is found living in Cromwell with John and Catharine Glack in 1850. John apparently remarried, wife being Mary after 1850. No trace of Samuel since then.

Only Jacob Q. Eby continued to 1909 when he died.

A review of many sites containing these families revealed a error. All assumed Peter, Susannah and John were sons of Jacob and Susannah, when in fact they were their grandchildren after their son David's death.

Same is true for Jacob who was assumed to be son of Jacob and Charlotte, and in reality, their young cousin.David Samuelsen

On 7/31/2012 12:33 AM, W David Samuelsen wrote:
Today, received death certificate from Pennsylvania for Jacob O/P/Q Eby

The disparity in middle name is crazy.

Census says Jacob Q. Eby

Gravemarker says Jacob O. Eby

Death Certificate says Jacob P. Eby

Jacob was born 10 Jan 1842 Shirley, Huntingdon, Pennsylvania to David Eby and Annie Long (per death certificate)

Died 11 Dec 1909 Altoona, Blair, Pennsylvania

Adminstration paper was filed 8 November 1849 for David Eby's estate,naming Jacob Eby and Samuel McVitty as administrators along with George Eby and George Jackson as sureties

Orphan's Court docket index mentioned guardianship paper filed for David's children (note the purality). It said Vol 5 page 90, and it has not been located yet.

Samuel mcvitty is identified as born 4 Nov 1815 in Shirleysburg, PA to Thomas McVitty and Mary Cook, wife was Esther McKinstry.

Jacob Eby is likely born 1807, to Benjamin Eby and Sarah Salome Baer;wife, Charlotte.

Jacob Eby is closest match to being father of David. Evidence is lacking.

Jacob Eby has Jacob Eby aged 8 in 1850 census. It is not known if it is his own son or if it is his grandson Jacob O/P/Q Eby because of the ages of other Eby's living in the household, in Hamilton, Franklin, Pennsylvania.

As for David's wife, Annie Long, she may be daughter of Christian Long who died in 1848 in Shirley.

Any information is appreciated to point in correct direction.

Anyone have full list for Germany Valley Cemetery where these Eby's are buried?

From:
"W David Samuelsen" 07/31/2012
 
Eby, Jacob Sr (I524069368)
 
102


01/29/2014
From Denise LAHR:

This is a tale of three neighboring families in Old Warwick Township: the Erismans, Habeckers and Ebys.

Melchior Erisman?s wife, Edith, followed through on a survey her deceased husband had obtained in 1728 for 204 acres and bought the rights to an adjacent warranted and surveyed parcel of 334 acres. On Feb. 20, 1740 she obtained patents for both parcels, making her a landed woman with 538 acres that included Pine Hill and lands on both sides of the Hammer Creek.

Meanwhile, George Eby, son of Theodorus, obtained his warrant for 150 acres southeast of the Erisman parcels along the same creek in 1733. In 1760 it was patented to Christian Eby, his eldest son.

Edith Erisman died. Daughter Magdalena had married Christian Eby, son of George. Her sisters, Anna, Barbara, and Elizabeth had married Jacob and Joseph, and John Habecker, respectively.

Anna (Erisman) and Jacob Habecker got 207 acres, consisting of most of the Pine Hill section of the warrant

Barbara (Erisman) and Joseph Habecker resided in Manor Township.

Flash forward to 1789 when Jacob Habecker died. He left a very controlling will (F-1-105) dated 1784: His only son, Jacob Habecker Jr. was given 170 acres. Daughter Elizabeth was to get the other 100 acres together with ?a locked chest with all its contents and no one else is allowed to search the same. She also got the remaining 100 acres and a good ?bed.? By the time of probate, Elizabeth was married to Jacob ?Old Jock? Eby. The children had the land resurveyed and found an additional 80 acres!

Meanwhile, in 1890, Christian Eby, sold the Eby 150 acres to Jacob Shaeffer, and that land passed out of the family. Son? Old Jock? didn?t need it because he had land from his wife.

Old Jock and Elizabeth had three sons: Abraham, Daniel and Jacob (Grobschmeid). The boys appointed a group of trusted neighbors to divide up the land ?according to the places where they now live.?

Here?s where Hannes Eby saved the day. Abraham?s only son, Jacob (what else), died young in 1841. He left a widow, Susanna (Grube), and a daughter, Fianna, 11 months old when he died.

After that, Abraham gave his share to brother Jacob (Grobschmeid) and moved west to Sugar Creek, Ohio. His wife was called Catherine in the deed, which threw me a bit, because her gravestone says Maria C. It turns out that she was literate and signed her name in Old German ?Catarina Maria.? Thank goodness I learned to read that stuff.

Daniel, I believe, went to Allen County, Indiana. Fortunately, I am going to Indiana in March and can research there.

Anyway, by 1845, all but Jacob had skedaddled west. Jacob remained behind and died in 1858. The property went to his son, John. [I believe there was another son, David, who went west to Sugar Creek and Uncle Abraham.] John left a son, Jacob who died in 1935.

That?s the broad strokes. It needs a lot more work.....

.....I will be putting it into a much more formal format with sources. Maybe even a paper for the Lancaster Mennonite Historical Society. Meanwhile you have the gist of it.

When working on Hannes Eby, I was dreadfully afraid of making mistakes. And I'm sure I did make some, but I always tried to say only what I was pretty darn sure of......

....In my work on this, I have also been forced to look at Jacob Eby's family, and I will be trying to sort out more of what happened to George Eby's other descendants.

I can't wait to get to Indiana and Ohio now.

Denise 
Eby, I George (I525577031)
 
103


01/29/2014
From Denise LAHR:

This is a tale of three neighboring families in Old Warwick Township: the Erismans, Habeckers and Ebys.

Melchior Erisman?s wife, Edith, followed through on a survey her deceased husband had obtained in 1728 for 204 acres and bought the rights to an adjacent warranted and surveyed parcel of 334 acres. On Feb. 20, 1740 she obtained patents for both parcels, making her a landed woman with 538 acres that included Pine Hill and lands on both sides of the Hammer Creek.

Meanwhile, George Eby, son of Theodorus, obtained his warrant for 150 acres southeast of the Erisman parcels along the same creek in 1733. In 1760 it was patented to Christian Eby, his eldest son.

Edith Erisman died. Daughter Magdalena had married Christian Eby, son of George. Her sisters, Anna, Barbara, and Elizabeth had married Jacob and Joseph, and John Habecker, respectively.

Anna (Erisman) and Jacob Habecker got 207 acres, consisting of most of the Pine Hill section of the warrant

Barbara (Erisman) and Joseph Habecker resided in Manor Township.

Flash forward to 1789 when Jacob Habecker died. He left a very controlling will (F-1-105) dated 1784: His only son, Jacob Habecker Jr. was given 170 acres. Daughter Elizabeth was to get the other 100 acres together with ?a locked chest with all its contents and no one else is allowed to search the same. She also got the remaining 100 acres and a good ?bed.? By the time of probate, Elizabeth was married to Jacob ?Old Jock? Eby. The children had the land resurveyed and found an additional 80 acres!

Meanwhile, in 1890, Christian Eby, sold the Eby 150 acres to Jacob Shaeffer, and that land passed out of the family. Son? Old Jock? didn?t need it because he had land from his wife.

Old Jock and Elizabeth had three sons: Abraham, Daniel and Jacob (Grobschmeid). The boys appointed a group of trusted neighbors to divide up the land ?according to the places where they now live.?

Here?s where Hannes Eby saved the day. Abraham?s only son, Jacob (what else), died young in 1841. He left a widow, Susanna (Grube), and a daughter, Fianna, 11 months old when he died.

After that, Abraham gave his share to brother Jacob (Grobschmeid) and moved west to Sugar Creek, Ohio. His wife was called Catherine in the deed, which threw me a bit, because her gravestone says Maria C. It turns out that she was literate and signed her name in Old German ?Catarina Maria.? Thank goodness I learned to read that stuff.

Daniel, I believe, went to Allen County, Indiana. Fortunately, I am going to Indiana in March and can research there.

Anyway, by 1845, all but Jacob had skedaddled west. Jacob remained behind and died in 1858. The property went to his son, John. [I believe there was another son, David, who went west to Sugar Creek and Uncle Abraham.] John left a son, Jacob who died in 1935.

That?s the broad strokes. It needs a lot more work.....

.....I will be putting it into a much more formal format with sources. Maybe even a paper for the Lancaster Mennonite Historical Society. Meanwhile you have the gist of it.

When working on Hannes Eby, I was dreadfully afraid of making mistakes. And I'm sure I did make some, but I always tried to say only what I was pretty darn sure of......

....In my work on this, I have also been forced to look at Jacob Eby's family, and I will be trying to sort out more of what happened to George Eby's other descendants.

I can't wait to get to Indiana and Ohio now.

Denise 
Eby or Aebi, Theodorus or Durst DD (I519979052)
 
104


01/29/2014
From Denise LAHR:

This is a tale of three neighboring families in Old Warwick Township: the Erismans, Habeckers and Ebys.

Melchior Erisman?s wife, Edith, followed through on a survey her deceased husband had obtained in 1728 for 204 acres and bought the rights to an adjacent warranted and surveyed parcel of 334 acres. On Feb. 20, 1740 she obtained patents for both parcels, making her a landed woman with 538 acres that included Pine Hill and lands on both sides of the Hammer Creek.

Meanwhile, George Eby, son of Theodorus, obtained his warrant for 150 acres southeast of the Erisman parcels along the same creek in 1733. In 1760 it was patented to Christian Eby, his eldest son.

Edith Erisman died. Daughter Magdalena had married Christian Eby, son of George. Her sisters, Anna, Barbara, and Elizabeth had married Jacob and Joseph, and John Habecker, respectively.

Anna (Erisman) and Jacob Habecker got 207 acres, consisting of most of the Pine Hill section of the warrant

Barbara (Erisman) and Joseph Habecker resided in Manor Township.

Flash forward to 1789 when Jacob Habecker died. He left a very controlling will (F-1-105) dated 1784: His only son, Jacob Habecker Jr. was given 170 acres. Daughter Elizabeth was to get the other 100 acres together with ?a locked chest with all its contents and no one else is allowed to search the same. She also got the remaining 100 acres and a good ?bed.? By the time of probate, Elizabeth was married to Jacob ?Old Jock? Eby. The children had the land resurveyed and found an additional 80 acres!

Meanwhile, in 1890, Christian Eby, sold the Eby 150 acres to Jacob Shaeffer, and that land passed out of the family. Son? Old Jock? didn?t need it because he had land from his wife.

Old Jock and Elizabeth had three sons: Abraham, Daniel and Jacob (Grobschmeid). The boys appointed a group of trusted neighbors to divide up the land ?according to the places where they now live.?

Here?s where Hannes Eby saved the day. Abraham?s only son, Jacob (what else), died young in 1841. He left a widow, Susanna (Grube), and a daughter, Fianna, 11 months old when he died.

After that, Abraham gave his share to brother Jacob (Grobschmeid) and moved west to Sugar Creek, Ohio. His wife was called Catherine in the deed, which threw me a bit, because her gravestone says Maria C. It turns out that she was literate and signed her name in Old German ?Catarina Maria.? Thank goodness I learned to read that stuff.

Daniel, I believe, went to Allen County, Indiana. Fortunately, I am going to Indiana in March and can research there.

Anyway, by 1845, all but Jacob had skedaddled west. Jacob remained behind and died in 1858. The property went to his son, John. [I believe there was another son, David, who went west to Sugar Creek and Uncle Abraham.] John left a son, Jacob who died in 1935.

That?s the broad strokes. It needs a lot more work.....

.....I will be putting it into a much more formal format with sources. Maybe even a paper for the Lancaster Mennonite Historical Society. Meanwhile you have the gist of it.

When working on Hannes Eby, I was dreadfully afraid of making mistakes. And I'm sure I did make some, but I always tried to say only what I was pretty darn sure of......

....In my work on this, I have also been forced to look at Jacob Eby's family, and I will be trying to sort out more of what happened to George Eby's other descendants.

I can't wait to get to Indiana and Ohio now.

Denise 
Eby, Christian (I617852321)
 
105


01/29/2014
From Denise LAHR:

This is a tale of three neighboring families in Old Warwick Township: the Erismans, Habeckers and Ebys.

Melchior Erisman?s wife, Edith, followed through on a survey her deceased husband had obtained in 1728 for 204 acres and bought the rights to an adjacent warranted and surveyed parcel of 334 acres. On Feb. 20, 1740 she obtained patents for both parcels, making her a landed woman with 538 acres that included Pine Hill and lands on both sides of the Hammer Creek.

Meanwhile, George Eby, son of Theodorus, obtained his warrant for 150 acres southeast of the Erisman parcels along the same creek in 1733. In 1760 it was patented to Christian Eby, his eldest son.

Edith Erisman died. Daughter Magdalena had married Christian Eby, son of George. Her sisters, Anna, Barbara, and Elizabeth had married Jacob and Joseph, and John Habecker, respectively.

Anna (Erisman) and Jacob Habecker got 207 acres, consisting of most of the Pine Hill section of the warrant

Barbara (Erisman) and Joseph Habecker resided in Manor Township.

Flash forward to 1789 when Jacob Habecker died. He left a very controlling will (F-1-105) dated 1784: His only son, Jacob Habecker Jr. was given 170 acres. Daughter Elizabeth was to get the other 100 acres together with ?a locked chest with all its contents and no one else is allowed to search the same. She also got the remaining 100 acres and a good ?bed.? By the time of probate, Elizabeth was married to Jacob ?Old Jock? Eby. The children had the land resurveyed and found an additional 80 acres!

Meanwhile, in 1890, Christian Eby, sold the Eby 150 acres to Jacob Shaeffer, and that land passed out of the family. Son? Old Jock? didn?t need it because he had land from his wife.

Old Jock and Elizabeth had three sons: Abraham, Daniel and Jacob (Grobschmeid). The boys appointed a group of trusted neighbors to divide up the land ?according to the places where they now live.?

Here?s where Hannes Eby saved the day. Abraham?s only son, Jacob (what else), died young in 1841. He left a widow, Susanna (Grube), and a daughter, Fianna, 11 months old when he died.

After that, Abraham gave his share to brother Jacob (Grobschmeid) and moved west to Sugar Creek, Ohio. His wife was called Catherine in the deed, which threw me a bit, because her gravestone says Maria C. It turns out that she was literate and signed her name in Old German ?Catarina Maria.? Thank goodness I learned to read that stuff.

Daniel, I believe, went to Allen County, Indiana. Fortunately, I am going to Indiana in March and can research there.

Anyway, by 1845, all but Jacob had skedaddled west. Jacob remained behind and died in 1858. The property went to his son, John. [I believe there was another son, David, who went west to Sugar Creek and Uncle Abraham.] John left a son, Jacob who died in 1935.

That?s the broad strokes. It needs a lot more work.....

.....I will be putting it into a much more formal format with sources. Maybe even a paper for the Lancaster Mennonite Historical Society. Meanwhile you have the gist of it.

When working on Hannes Eby, I was dreadfully afraid of making mistakes. And I'm sure I did make some, but I always tried to say only what I was pretty darn sure of......

....In my work on this, I have also been forced to look at Jacob Eby's family, and I will be trying to sort out more of what happened to George Eby's other descendants.

I can't wait to get to Indiana and Ohio now.

Denise 
Eby, Jacob (I7552970396)
 
106


1922 U.S. City Directories, 1821-1989 about Moray L Eby
Name: Moray L Eby
Gender: M (Male)
Residence Year: 1922
Residence Place: Cedar Rapids, Iowa
Occupation: Sub Clerk
Spouse: Pearl Eby
Publication Title: Cedar Rapids, Iowa, City Directory, 1922 
Eby, Moray Leon (I272008475833)
 
107


At the beginning of the 19th century, industrialization, urbanization, and immigration contributed to the explosive growth of New York City. Accompanying this growth was a burgeoning underclass of convicts, the poor, the sick, and the insane. A policy of institutionalization was adopted to manage this group. In 1828, New York City purchased an island in the East River from the Blackwell family to build a jail and an asylum. When it opened in 1839, the asylum on Blackwell?s Island was New York?s first publicly funded mental hospital and the first municipal mental hospital in the United States.

It was designed to be a state-of-the-art institution based on the theories of moral treatment. Fundamental to its success was an organized and orderly environment. Although in the past, little effort was made to differentiate between types of mental illness, according to the tenets of moral treatment, such distinctions were imperative. As Dr. John McDonald, a physician involved with the design of the new asylum, wrote, ?The indiscriminate mingling of the mild and furious, clean and filthy, convalescent and idiotic, need only be witnessed to be deprecated.? He continued: ?Classification is now justly considered by almost all persons of experience of the first importance in the treatment of insanity? (1). He suggested that patients be divided into four specific classes: the ?noisy, destructive, and violent,? ?the idiots,? ?the convalescents,? and an intermediate class for ?those in the first stages of convalescence and such incurables (who) are harmless and not possessed of bad habits? (2). In addition to classification, moral treatment emphasized the human rather than beast-like nature of the insane. The design for the new asylum was free of barricades and iron bars and allowed for easy access to the outdoors.

But this model asylum was never built. Because of financial constraints, only two wings were completed and almost immediately proved inadequate. Even more disturbing, convicts from the nearby penitentiary were used as guards and attendants, so that in the words of Dr. Thomas Kirkbride, the patients were ?abandoned to the tender mercies of thieves and prostitutes? (3).

Thousands of the city?s poor mentally ill were admitted to the asylum between 1839 and 1895, and the press?s fascination with the institution and its inhabitants grew intense during those years. Local newspapers, including the New York Times and Harpers Weekly, provided weekly running accounts of the asylum?s most intriguing characters. Some achieved celebrity-like status, such as the elderly woman known as ?Mrs. Buchanan.?

Most people have heard of Mrs. Buchanan. She is one of the incurables?a poor old lady?Scotch I imagine?who has been an inmate of the lunatic asylum for years. Her delusion has been described in the papers. She believes she is the wife of the President and discharges her conjugal duties with such success that she bears a large family to the President. Strange to say, the offspring of her lofty amours are invariably cats. I had the honor of stroking the back of President Buchanan?s eldest son who purred as though his sire had no political difficulties to disturb his repose. (4)

Newspapers were filled with grim tales of madness, mistreated patients, wretched conditions, and wrongful confinement. In 1879, an article titled ?Tormenting the Insane? appeared in the New York Times describing appalling cases of neglect. In 1887, Elizabeth Cochrane Seamen, aka Nellie Bly (1866?1922), a journalist for the New York World, feigned insanity to gain admission to the asylum on Blackwell?s Island. She wrote a series of shocking articles for the newspaper and a book. She described it as a ?human rat-trap? that could drive the sanest people crazy (5).

In the wake of the scathing report, administrative changes followed, but the image of the asylum as a human rat trap lingered. The half-built, overcrowded, convict-supervised asylum was a symbol for the unrealized goals and the blatant failures so extensively covered in the press. The New York City Lunatic Asylum on Blackwell?s Island closed in 1894. All that remains of it today is a domed octagonal structure that once stood as the centerpiece of the institution.

1.Board of Assistant Aldermen: Document 101, March 10, 1934: Documents of the Board of Aldermen and Board of Assistants of the City of New York. New York, the Board, 1831?1834, p 8172.Board of Assistant Aldermen: Document 101, March 10, 1934: Documents of the Board of Aldermen and Board of Assistants of the City of New York. New York, the Board, 1831?1834, p 8203.Kirkbride TS: Proceedings of the Third Meeting of the Association of Medical Superintendents of American Institutions for the Insane, Article V. New York, July 1848, p 914.A Visit to the lunatic asylum on Blackwell?s Island. Harper?s Weekly, March 19, 1859, p 1865.Nellie Bly: Ten Days in a Madhouse?Feigning Insanity in Order to Reveal Asylum Horrors. New York, Norman Munro, 1887, p 93
References

Address correspondence and reprint requests to Dr. Boardman, Weill Cornell Medical College, 449 East 68th St., 2nd Fl., Suite 9, New York, NY 10021; samboardmanmd@nyc.rr.com (e-mail). Images courtesy of Oskar Diethelm Library, Institute for the History of Psychiatry, Weill Cornell Medical College. The authors report no competing interests.
Ten Days in a Madhouse: The Woman Who Got Herself Committed


 
Crowley, Catherine (I8177510280)
 
108


From Abernathy Genealogy Genforum; 10/2013

From the Library of Virginia digital archives, Land Office Patents No. 3, 1652-1655, p.144



"To all whereas now know you that I the said Richard Bennett Esquire give and grant unto Robert West seven hundred acres of land lying upon the branches of Baylies Creek in Charles City County toward the south side of the head of the said creek bounded as followeth south by east by James Warrentines land commonly called and known by the name of High Poahoe now in the occupation of Mister William Dibby and Robert Lanyman East by North along in the woods having the westerly and southerly branch running through the said land The said land being due to Captain Robert West by and for the transportation of fourteen persons To have and to hold Failing on paying which payment is to be made seven years after the first grant or selling thereof and not before provided Dated the 2nd of August 1652

Robert West, Susanna West, John West, Daniel Evans, Nancy Bowman, Mary Owen, Samuel Geringer, Henry Wentworth, Jane Connelly, Robert Ebernathell, John Coppin, George Willett, Jeffrey Phillips, John Reeves"


It looks like all the people transported had common surnames still in use in America today except for Robert Ebernathell a.k.a. Robert Abernathy the "immigrant". I don't know why he Robert Abernathy still used Scottish Gaelic spelling and was the only person who did. The land grant above was pretty hard to transcribe.There are no punctuation marks except there are some random marks here and there in the original record made by the county clerk. I don't think those county clerks wanted anyone writing on their records. I guess they used goose feathers and ink instead of a computer. In my May 19, 2009 message #2983 on this Abernathy Genforum message board I had Sam Jeringoe for Samuel Geringer above, John Coppage for John Coppin and Ham Wentworth for Henry Wentworth. Looks like this land could be located on a map. Would they transport prisoners of war with women and children assuming that John West is a child of Robert and Susanna West and who was the crew on the ship? I still don't know if "High Poahoe" above is accurate and it is likely that the women weren't prisoners of war and were not in chains. I doubt if anyone was in chains. These people came from Scotland or England on a ship to what is now Prince George County Virginia in the year 1652. Prince George County was formed from Charles City County in 1703.

I would like to get these names above as accurate as possible because someone might come along one of these years and know exactly who these people were and exactly where they came from. I do not know what happened to any of these 14 people except for Robert Ebernathell (Abernathy) and not that much about him. I think it would be very interesting to know what happened to these people in America and who they were in the old country (Scotland - England - Ireland probably). Any help appreciated. Thanks.

Charlie Abernathy


Charlie, 11/2013

Margaret has unearthed records that exactly locate the 100 acres first purchased by our immigrant, Robert Abernathy. It somehow later became a gift to the Merchant's Hope Church (Blackwater, VA) and if you google it, you can clearly see the cemetery as it now is. It's not on the James River Road itself (highway 10), but on the Merchant's Road (Hwy 641) that heads south-west from the James River Rd. All in all, it's about a mile from the James River on the south side of the River in Prince George County.

Elizabeth Ferguson


Elizabeth, 11/2013

I did google Merchant's Hope Cemetery like you said and got the street view and it looks like our Robert 1 and Sarah Abernathy had a nice place to live so that's good. It was a very long time ago but it seems like yesterday when you are doing genealogy and that they will show up any time. So the church and cemetery are actually on their original 100 acres of land and they must have been very proud. I would have been. Thank you.

Charlie 
Abernathy, Robert I (I543657046)
 
109


From: A Catalogue of the Names of the Early Puritan Settlers of the Colony of Connecticut
By: Royal Ralph Hinman




ABERNETHE, (Ebernethe, Ebernathe, Ebernatha,) WILLIAM, a Scotchman, was early in Connecticut, first at Branford, and from thence to Wallingford. He first married Sarah Feb. 17, 1673, and married Elizabeth for his second wife. His children at Wallingford, were Elizabeth, b. Oct. 15, 1673; William, Jr., b. July 23, 1675; Sarah, b. Oct. 10, 1677 ; Mary, b. March 27, 1679? 80; Samuel, b. Jan. 10, 1683, d. March 14, 1723 ; Daniel, b. Sept. 30, 1686,d. Oct. 31, 1723; Susannah, b. July 18, 1689; Damaris, daughter of William and Sarah, b. Aug. 31, l7._.

ABERNETHE, SAMUEL,-son of William, Sen., married Elizabeth Peck, Aug. 10, 1710; issue, Abraham, b. March 1, 1712; probably others.

ABERNETHE, WILLIAM, Jr., and wife Mary, had children, Sarah, b. Dec. 15, 1705; Caleb, b. Feb. 11, 1710; Ann, b. June '7, 1706; John, b. Feb. 27, 1708; Susannah, b. April 28, 1712; Joseph, b. June 20, 1714; Hannah, b. Aug. 30, 17?; John, b. ? Jemima, daughter of William and Mary, b. Aug. 29, 1702; perhaps others.

ABERNATHE, ENOS, of Wallingford, married Beulah, and had issue: Samuel, b. May 5, 1738; Naomi, b. Oct. 6, 1739; Benjamin, b. Aug. 13. 1741 ; 2d Samuel, d. April 11, 1742, and Benjamin, d. Jan. 3,1741?2; Naomi, d. June 2, 1742; 2d Naomi, d. Jan. 4, 1743; 2d Samuel, b. Aug. 23, 1744; Beulah, b. March 28, 1746; Abigail, b. Nov. 27, 1748.

SUSANNAH, daughter of ?-?, m. Samuel Yale, March 11, 1736. SARAH ABERNETHE, m. Thomas Doolittle, (by Capt. Yale,) May 27, 1730. ELIZABETH EBENETHE, was m. by Capt. Hall, to Wm. Hough, Dec. 14, 1726. SUSANNA ABERNETHA, m. George Merriman, Jan. 8, 1713. JEMlMA,daughter of ?'illiam, Jr., and Mary, in. John Curtis, June 17,1723. ELIZABETH ABERNATHA, m. John Ward, May 11,1736. MARTHA ABERNATHA, m. Job Brockett, Feb. 27, 1750?1, by Rev. Philemon Robbins. ABIGAIL ABERNATHA, m. Robert Collins, May 4, 1736. ANNA d. Nov. 23,1726. JOHN, son of William and hiary Abernatha, ? was struck dead, by thunder,? 810. May 12, 1727. WILLIAM EBERNATHA, d. Feb. 17, 1728. .JESSE ABERNETHE, d. Dec. 2, 1741. JARED, son of Caleb, m. Lois Thompson, daughter of Dea. Gideon, of Goshen, May 26, 1766, and had a son Cyrus, b. there, June 11, 1767. \VAITE ABERNETHE and DAMARIS ABE RNETHE witnessed the will of Mathew Bel]amy, of Wallirégrford, in 1744.

ABERNATHA, CALEB, son of William and Mary, m. Lois Gaylord, of Wallingford, (by Capt. Yale,) Sept. 26, 1733. Issue, William, b. July 1, 1734; Mary, b. Nov. 18, 1736, d. Nov. 29, 1736; John, b. July 2, 1738; 2d Mary, b. Dec. 9, 1739; Jared, b. Oct. 81, 1741.

About 1743, the above Caleb and Lois removed to Farmington, (in that part of the town now Bristol,) where the following children are recorded, viz: Giles, b. Dec. 3, 1744; Waite, b. Dec. 16, 1745; Caleb, Jr., b. April 8, 1748, d. 1751 ; Lois, b. April 10, 1750, m. William ?~?; Ann, b. March 15, 1754; Mary, b. , m. Daniel Bacon, Oct. 24, 1765; Caleb, d. 1759. His son John was executor of his will. The foregoing are the ancestors of those of the name, at Harwinton, Torringford, Washington, Woodbury, Bridgeport, and other towns in Connecticut. As imperfect as the foregoing list is, it may aid them in perfecting a full roll of their ancestors. Four of the name had graduated at Yale College, before 1851.

ABERNETH has one coat of arms. ABERNETHY has three coats of arms.

This name is often found upon the records, spelled Ebernathe, Ebernatha, and Ebernetha, kc. 
Abernethy, Doctor William Gaylord (I1191199066)
 
110


I am confused. I have Wayland Abernathy born 1917 the son of Robert (Buddie) Abernathy and Millie Strickland. I did some searching for Buddie and I find the following:


North Carolina, Death Certificates, 1909-1975 about R B Abernathy
Name: R B Abernathy
Gender: Male
Race: White
Age: 55
Birth Date: 3 Oct 1882
Birth Place: Nash, North Carolina, United States
Death Date: 22 Sep 1938
Death Location: Spring Hope, NC # 1, Nash
Spouse's Name: Mrs. Millie Abernathy
Father's Name: John T Abernathy
Mother's name: Celia Hedgepeth
January 2013

Subject: Re: Proposed Change: Wayland Gray Abernathy (I1809000704)

Check out ancestry.com and search for my family tree under Abernathy. I'm traveling Today but I'll check back with you later this evening.

Sent from my iPhone




It has the same DOB and DOD as I have for my Buddie but this death certificate states his parents are John Abernathy and Celia Hedgepeth. Is the Death Certificate NOT the correct one for Buddie? It states his wife was Millie.... DO I have Buddie attached to the incorrect parents?


Mila




I'll have to check with my Dad. There are questions about my Great-Grandfather. The tombstone in Spring Hope, NC says 'R.B. Abernathy.' He is buried next to Millie and their daughter Janice had her ashes spread at the foot of their graves.

The confusion comes from the fact that one of my Uncle's, Christopher Ira, gets his middle name from his Grandfather. My Dad remembers the name Ira Bo from his childhood, but only remembers his Grandfather being called R.B. or
Buddie.

Any of that help?

Wayland 3




Well, I am confused as to whether I had the correct information about Robert E Abernathy son of Caleb and Martha. I had him married to Millie Strickland
with Iva DOB 1906, Thomas DOB 1910 and Wayland DOB 1917 as their children BUT I have been going through the census records for Caleb and Martha and following Robert along with those census records.
They CLEARLY state as follows:

1900 Census Ironton, Lincoln, North Carolina as Robert E ABERNETHY
1910 Census Ironton, Lincoln, North Carolina as Robert E ABERNATHY
1920 Census Ironton, Lincoln, North Carolina as Robert E ABNERTHY; single
1930 Census Ironton, Lincoln, North Carolina as Robt E ABERNATHY; single
1940 Census Ironton, Lincoln, North Carolina as Robert E ABERNATHY; single
living with his nephew Ted ABERNATHY

In all of these records he states he is single. I think what I am trying to say is this Robert, the son of Caleb and Martha is not Buddie. I think I had two Roberts confused. But that leave the question that are you sure Caleb and Martha are your BUDDIES parents? I am now going searching to your Buddie or R B ABERNATHY and his wife and see if I can find who his parents are according to census records. I do see a census record for 1910 Mannings, Nash, North Carolina (this is the person I had previously thought was the Robert, son of Caleb and Martha) so I will see where that takes me and get back to you. SOON.

Mila





I'll have to check with my Dad. There are questions about my Great-Grandfather. The tombstone in Spring Hope, NC says 'R.B. Abernathy.' He is buried next to Millie and their daughter Janice had her ashes spread at the foot of their graves.

The confusion comes from the fact that one of my Uncle's, Christopher Ira, gets his middle name from his Grandfather. My Dad remembers the name Ira Bo from his childhood, but only remembers his Grandfather being called R.B. or Buddie.

Any of that help?

Wayland 3
 
Abernathy, Robert B (I1809002657)
 
111


Name: Vaughn C Tehonica
Birth Date: 17 Aug 1938
Address: 1 R Box 477
City: Waterloo
State: SC
Zip Code: 29384

Vaughn C Tehonica RR 1 Armstrong CT Waterloo SC 29384

Vaughn C Tehonica Delta Black D Orchard Hill GA 30266

Vaughn C Tehonica 17 Aug 1938 1 R Box 477 Waterloo SC 29384

Vaughn Tehonica 17 Aug 1938 Rr01 Box 477 Waterloo SC 29384

Vaughn C Tehonica 17 Aug 1938 4 R 1 Box 477 Waterloo SC 29384

Vaughn Tehonica 17 Aug 1938 477 RR 1 Box Waterloo SC 29384

Vaughn C Tehonica 17 Aug 1938 PO Box 717 Milner GA 30257-0717

Vaughn Tehonica 17 Aug 1938 2199 RR 1 Box Griffin GA 30223

Vaughn C Tehonica 17 Aug 1938 R 1 Azealea Dr Waterloo SC 29384
 
Tehonica, Vaughn Clarence (I7)
 
112


Note to readers: This article contains graphic details about a murder, and quotes newspaper articles whose language reflects the racial attitudes of the 1930s.


Cold Off the Presses: the murder of Carter Deatherage
By Laura Bien

Farmhand ?Cap? Deatherage woke from a stupor.

He blinked and squeezed shut his eyes a few times. The barn?s hayloft was cold. Snow was falling outside the loading door.

Deatherage stretched and slowly sat up. Farm work was over for the season; he?d have to overwinter in Ypsilanti.

As he shuffled to the hayloft ladder, his foot hit an empty whiskey bottle.

It was the Friday after Thanksgiving, 1932.

A few hours later, in a dingy Ypsilanti ?dance hall,? Deatherage ?ate, drank, and danced during the afternoon hours,? said the Dec. 1, 1932 Ypsilanti Daily Press. He ?drank excessively and finally lost consciousness. He fell across a dirty bed in the living quarters of the dance hall, where he slept as [several people] shuffled about in their dances without benefit of music.?

Next morning, at 8:15 a.m., Ypsilanti South Side resident William Jones headed for the well in the back of his yard to get water. He walked past his chicken pen and a few dead tomato stalks sticking out of the snow. What he found at his well led to an investigation and trial that dominated city news for almost two weeks and caused an uproar in Jones? neighborhood, called ?The Hill.?

In an area roughly enclosed by Hamilton, Michigan Avenue, and the modern-day I-94, stood streets of small homes alternating with run-down houses serving as blind pigs and so-called ?dance halls.? The neighborhood held a tense mixture of struggling poor residents and a shifting population of drifters and criminals, who preyed on their more settled neighbors.

Jones? ?chicken yard has been robbed, on several occasions attempts have been made to enter his house; everything has to be kept under lock and key,? said the Dec. 1 Ypsilanti Daily Press. ??The Hill? is getting to be a place where respectable residents are obliged to carry arms. Three times in the last two years Mr. Jones has shot into the air to frighten away intruders.?

This morning was far worse. Jones found a dying man at the well. His body lay on blood-soaked snow. Tire tracks led from the road to the well and back. The man?s overcoat was torn up the back seam and his collar, shirt, and pants were ripped. As Jones approached, the man groaned. ?By marks easily distinguishable, it is certain that the man was slashed at the spot where he was found,? reported the Nov. 26 Press. ?He had been fiendishly attacked and a portion of his flesh was found 10 feet from the body.? Jones called the police. The man was taken to Beyer Hospital with bruises and lacerations, a possible broken skull, broken neck and jaw and severe loss of blood. There he died.

During a search of the man?s clothing, officers found the title and keys to an old Model T. The title indicated the car had been transferred to a Carter Deatherage, from an Ed Wagner in Dundee. Police chief Ralph Southard contacted Wagner and found that Wagner had bought the car from a Glen Evert, who in turn had bought it from a Mr. Sedimier. A clue came when an acquaintance of Sedimier's told police that a man matching the victim?s description had worked for Milan-area farmer William Woolsey. Police found that Woolsey?s son?s employee, farm laborer Charles Garner, had seen the car?s owner two days earlier.

Police arranged for Garner to view the body, which was undergoing an autopsy in Ann Arbor at the University Hospital. Garner confirmed that the body was that of Carter Deatherage. Garner told police that he?d seen Deatherage on Thanksgiving Day, visibly drunk and complaining that he?d been beaten by a woman. Deatherage apparently had no local relatives with whom to spend the holiday. He slept in John Woolsey?s barn on Thanksgiving night, said Garner, and disappeared some time on Friday.

Police learned that on Friday, Deatherage had driven to Ypsilanti and returned to John Woolsey?s farm with Hill resident O.D. Hall. At the farm, they collected Deatherage?s clothing and the run-down trailer he had lived in, which Deatherage gave to Hall. Deatherage had arranged to overwinter in Ypsilanti, in a shack on the Hill?s Watling Street. Returning to Ypsilanti, Deatherage dropped off Hall. He bought some meat and headed for an abandoned house that now served as a dance hall at First and Jefferson. Already drunk, he wanted a ?feed? and more liquor.

On the afternoon of the discovery of Deatherage?s body, police took Hall in for questioning along with three other Hill residents: a white woman, Ellen Harvey, and African Americans Tom Britten and Frank Powell. Powell lived near and used to own the dance hall where Deatherage spent Friday afternoon. Recently released from the Detroit House of Correction for a liquor violation, Harvey was described by police chief Ralph Southard as Powell?s housekeeper. Hall was released on Saturday afternoon, but the other suspects remained in custody over the weekend.

By Monday, Nov. 28, after questioning the suspects, police learned that Deatherage had spent Friday afternoon in the dance hall. He was with Britten, Tom Kersey, Ed Talbert, and Talbert?s half-brother Carey Hunt, also known as Casey Baylis, who was the current owner of the dance hall. Baylis had been released from the county jail on Thanksgiving after serving 10 days for disorderly conduct. The men told police that Deatherage had passed out drunk and slept for most of the afternoon, and had left at 5 pm. Britten and Powell insisted that Ellen Harvey had not been there.

By now police had found that Deatherage was a former Army private in the 125th infantry. He had entered the army in 1918 and was honorably discharged a year later after fighting in France. Police also found that Deatherage had a brother Arthur, living on Terminal Avenue in Detroit. Arthur traveled to Ypsilanti for questioning. He disagreed with the police?s theory that the crime was due to jealousy over a woman. Before returning to Detroit, Arthur said, according to the Monday, Nov. 28 Press, that ?his brother had shown no interest in women since he became involved with one accused of burning his home in Virginia.?

On Monday afternoon, Deatherage was buried in Highland Cemetery. ?There will be no mourners as the brother from Detroit is destitute and unable to finance a second trip to Ypsilanti,? said the Press. ?The expense of the funeral is taken from the county fund for soldier?s burial. Brief rites will be conducted at the grave and there will be no pallbearers.?

On Tuesday, Nov. 29, the police again questioned Powell, Britten and Harvey. They also brought into custody and questioned Casey Baylis. ?Their stories did not coincide and all repeatedly were trapped in lies,? said the Tuesday, Nov. 29, Press, ?but up to a late hour this afternoon, officers had been unable to obtain an admission of guilt. . .?

Contrary to Britten and Powell?s earlier testimony, Ellen Harvey said she had indeed been at the dance hall, but left at 5:45 p.m. She said that Deatherage had been there. Britten, late on Monday, amended his story to say that Deatherage had been at the hall until 7 p.m., instead of 5. On Tuesday, he changed his story again, to say that Deatherage had been there until some time between 10 p.m. and midnight. Britten was grilled throughout Tuesday by police officers and prosecutor A.J. Rapp. Officers also combed the crime scene. ?Deatherage was not killed, officers are certain, on the Jones property. Automobile tracks near the pump house, and blood at the roadside, indicate he was brought there after the first attack had been made,? said the Tuesday, Nov. 29, Press. ?If he was killed in the [dance hall], it had been well cleaned up before officers arrived. . . Robbery is now considered the likely motive. Deatherage had money and had been spending it for liquor during the day. Police believe the gruesome lacerations about his abdomen may have been an afterthought, in an effort to send investigators off on a false clue.?

On the morning of Wednesday, Nov. 30, Britten confessed to murder. His confession detailed the last night of Deatherage?s life. Britten said that he, Baylis, and Deatherage had been in the dance hall late into the evening. Baylis urged Britten to rob Deatherage. But robbery wasn?t the motive for the attack, claimed Britten. It was because Deatherage had flung a racial epithet to ?the men of the race he had been taught to command at his home in the South,? said the Dec. 1 Press.

Britten said Deatherage left the dance hall around midnight. As Britten followed him down the steps, he picked up a cudgel about 3 feet long. Britten said he followed Deatherage to the well and struck him twice, once on his head with the cudgel and once with his hand. ?It is the opinion of Prosecuting Attorney Rapp that Britten, who is known to have a violent temper, struck Deatherage more than twice,? said the Wednesday, November 30 Press. ?Officers describe Britten as of a ?mean? disposition and recalled that on one occasion he had bitten a piece out of the arm of his wife, Edith. He has been arrested for desertion of her and their children and for disorderliness, but has not previously been implicated in a major crime. He has lived in Ypsilanti practically all his life.?

On Wednesday, after signing his confession, Britten was taken to court. Pleading guilty, he was sentenced to life imprisonment in a Marquette prison. Baylis, who with Britten was jointly charged with the murder, pleaded not guilty. He headed to trial.

Baylis? Ann Arbor attorney, Louis Burke, told Ann Arbor?s Judge Sample that the law allowed for a 10-day waiting period before the trial and that he needed time to prepare a defense. ?Judge Sample stated that he was absolutely not in sympathy with delays and that it was his policy to mete out swift, sure justice,? said the Thursday, Dec. 1, Press, ?but because of the legal technicalities cited by Baylis? attorney, he allowed him until Saturday morning to determine at what time the case should be heard.? Ellen Harvey was to be a witness. She did not face charges but did not make a favorable impression. The Thursday Press reported that ?arrangements are being made to keep her from remaining in Ypsilanti.?

Thursday?s paper also contained an article headlined ?Colored People of City Want "The Law" to Clean Drifters Out Of ?The Hill?.?

The article attributed trouble on The Hill as due to transient residents ?asking no questions, giving and taking what they have or can find or steal in the way of food or clothing ... Mr. Jones hopes the [murder, an] outgrowth of moonshine whiskey and disreputable mingling of the races, will bring about the needed reform. The respectable Ypsilanti colored people have had enough.?

Two days later, the paper published a plea from Hill residents for Ypsilanti police to clean up the area. Chief of police Ralph Southard agreed to monitor the neighborhood and responded by asking residents to watch their neighborhoods and inform police of suspicious characters. Three days later, Bertha Robinson was banned from the city after creating a disturbance at another dance hall, and sent home to Flint. The watchfulness continued. The Dec. 30 Press reported that police were patrolling The Hill and questioning strangers to make sure they had legitimate business there.

On Monday morning, Dec. 12, five witnesses testified in the Baylis trial. First was farmhand William Garner. He described his identification of the slain man and speculated as to how much money Deatherage had had on his person. After Garner, Dr. F.B. Williamson described being called to Beyer Hospital to tend to the dying man. Next was Dr. E.C. Ganzhorn, Ann Arbor coroner. He corroborated Williamson?s description of the injuries, described the autopsy procedure, and gave as cause of death concussion of the brain and loss of blood.

Next on the witness stand came two officers, Coy Rankin and Ernest Maddux. The men described the scene where they?d found Deatherage and called an ambulance.

Shortly before noon, testimony was given by Tom Kersey, who lived in Casey Baylis?s dance hall. He said Deatherage asked Hall for help in moving his trailer to Ypsilanti. Kersey said he ended up going as well, along with Britten, Baylis, and Talbert, to the spot where the trailer had been left by the side of the road. Later, at the dance hall, Kersey testified he had been called, by a person and for a reason he didn?t name, into the rear section of the hall where Baylis had living quarters, at about 10:30 or 11 p.m. He denied that he went there for liquor. Ellen Harvey followed him on the witness stand and testified that she had been at the dance hall and had had two drinks while there.

The following morning, Tuesday Dec. 13, Sheriff Jacob Andres offered testimony about a new confession Britten had given the day before. The officer said Britten claimed that Baylis had helped Britten commit the crime. Prior to this claim, Baylis had been regarded only as an accessory. Andres reported that Britten confessed that both he and Baylis had pursued Deatherage. Baylis, said Britten, had a broken ax handle and he himself had a club; they had killed Deatherage together. According to Britten, Baylis then gave his knife to Britten and told him to disfigure the body. Baylis stole $38 from the body and gave Britten $3. Britten threw his club into the night. The two returned to the dance hall, where Baylis hid the ax handle under some potatoes and apples in a bin. They talked over the crime for three hours, agreed to keep quiet, and went to sleep.

Britten next took the stand. He described the movements of all the people who had been at the dance hall Friday night. Other witnesses on Tuesday included George Randall and William Dailey, who were two deputies of Sheriff Andres; William Woolsey, justice Jay Payne; who had first examined Baylis; and chief of police Ralph Southard, who said he had found Baylis?s stick hidden in the dance hall.

With testimony concluded, after closing arguments the case went to the jury on Thursday, Dec. 15. ?It was decided not to force the jury to remain in the courthouse overnight,? said the Dec. 16 Ypsilanti Daily Press, ?when it was discovered that beds kept in the building for that purpose were coated with nearly an inch of dust.? Twenty-four hours later, the jury returned a verdict: not guilty.

The sad and sordid case was apparently over, but questions remain.

Why did Baylis and Britten insist that Ellen Harvey was not at the dance hall on the Friday Deatherage was there, although she herself said she was?

Why were there tire tracks leading to the well house, and blood on the snow some distance from the well house, when Britten said he had been ?following Deatherage [on foot] to the vacant lot where the well is located, [and] struck him . . .?? The Nov. 26 Press had reported ?It is evident by tracks that Deatherage was not killed near the spot where he was found. . . he had been apparently carried from a [car] to the side of the small well house.? William Jones reported hearing a car ?pass his house, turn the corner, and stop? between 4:30 and 5 a.m. on Saturday morning but didn?t bother to investigate.

Why did police not search Deatherage?s Model T? Where was the car? Although Deatherage had a set of keys on his person, suggesting that without them no one could drive his car, it was not only possible but easy to hotwire Model Ts, or, for the older models, jjuryrig a substitute key. When Deatherage came to town on Friday, with money and presumably a car, did the impoverished criminals on The Hill view him as easy pickings for car and bankroll theft?

Deatherage?s existence was grim, lonely, and short. It must be hoped that, in death, after his hardscrabble life, he at last found peace.

"Cold Off The Presses" is published every Wednesday on AnnArbor.com. 
Deatherage, Captain S (I272008479120)
 
113


Ref. "The Hord Family Of Virginia" by Alfred Harris Hord

States: Jane married John Sherrill NOT William Sherrill 
Hord, Jane (I272008483066)
 
114


Ref: "Genealogy of the Hord Family" by Rev. Arnold Harris Hord, 1898

States: Abner 5 (Elias 1 , Jesse 3 , Thomas 2 , John 1 ), was born in Mason County, Kentucky, June 18, 1801, and married Adelaide Parker. He was a magistrate of Mason County for a
number of years. I lis wife was born in Mason County,
Kentucky, February 8, 1803, and died January 27, 1868.
He died in Mason County, Kentucky, June 9, 1873.  
Hord, Abner Sr (I272008483315)
 
115


Ref: "Genealogy of the Hord Family" by Rev. Arnold Harris Hord, 1898

States: lived in Danville, Kentucky and moved to Garrad Kentucky, where he married Lucinda. 
Hord, Spillman (I272008482856)
 
116


The only reason why I don't have any other children listed is the census
records only go through 1940 and Jack Jr was born in 1935 so he was on the
1940 census. So I am assuming that you and your other brother were born
after 1940 or in late 1940 as the census was taken early 1940. Since Jack
Sr passed away in 1949 it would have been before that.

I did check births for Tennessee and found no birth records for Jack Sr and
Sarah Rion' s children.

Again, I would be happy to add anything you would like to send to make this
family more accurate. I am sorry you seem to be unhappy about my lack of
information but sometimes information is just not there for someone to find.

Mila Eby Bernethy


It doesn't matter - we know who we are - just happened by accident to see
it and could not believe that if one child's birth records were found why
the others weren't - it is totally inaccurate - there are two other
children - I am the only child still alive - lots of beautiful
grandchildren and great grandchildren - we have kept rather good records
on this family form many generations - at least 3 back and 2 forward now.

-----Original Message-----
From: Mila Bernethy [mailto:bernie@techline.com]
Sent: Monday, March 24, 2014 5:30 PM
To: bflinkow@wmco.net
Subject: Re: Proposed Change: Jack Ruel Abernathy, Sr (I1191205184)

Well, I do not mean to be inaccurate but I can only document what I know
and I knew nothing of any other children. I would be happy to add
anything you would like to send me. The more information the better!


Mila Eby Bernethy
360-533-8351
bernie@techline.com
Bernethy's Research Services at:
www.genealogysearch4u.webs.com




-----Original Message-----
From: Elizabeth Rion Abernathy Flinkow
Sent: Friday, March 07, 2014 8:29 AM
To: bernie@techline.com
Subject: Proposed Change: Jack Ruel Abernathy, Sr (I1191205184)

Proposed Change: Jack Ruel Abernathy, Sr (I1191205184)
Tree: Abernathy, Charles and Alice Short
Link:
http://www.bernethy-eby-scribner.com/getperson.php?personID=I1191205184&tr
ee=Abernathy5

Description: Description: I am the living breathing daughter of Jack
Reuel Abernathy, Sr. and Sarah Bell Rion Abernathy and you do not have me
listed as a child of theirs - you only show my brother (and actually there
was another brother) your records are not accurate

Elizabeth Rion Abernathy Flinkow
bflinkow@wmco.net


 
Abernathy, Elizabeth (I1191210953)
 
117


U.S. Civil War Soldiers, 1861-1865 about Eli Broughton
Name: Eli Broughton
Side: Union
Regiment State/Origin: Pennsylvania
Regiment Name: 2 Pennsylvania Cav.
Regiment Name Expanded: 2nd Regiment, Pennsylvania Cavalry (59th Volunteers)
Company: I
Rank In: Private
Rank In Expanded: Private
Rank Out: Private
Rank Out Expanded: Private
Film Number: M554 roll 14 
Broughton, Private Eli Andrew (I554866733)
 
118

(4) The first settler on Dutch Hill was a native of CT, Lemuel Wallbridge who was located, as early as 1812, near its top. That year, Christian Shelp, originally from NY, and of Dutch descent, came from Milford, and bought of Dr. Rose four hundred acres, just below Mr. Wallbridge. Henry Pruyne, father-in-law of Mr. Shelp, accompanied the latter from Great Bend, where he had settled 2 years previously. He was a soldier of the Revolution and a pensioner. His death occurred in 1843, and that of his wife, Rachel, the following year, at the age of 81.
Charles Davis, a son-in-law of Mr. Shelp, came in about the some time and settled near him. The sons of Christian Shelp were John, Nathaniel, Henry, Christian, Jr. (actually the 3rd), and Stephen. The Shelps were the first of the Dutch families in Jessup. Henry S. now lives on the same place where his father lived 40 years ago.
Dutch Hill is noted for its famous yields of maple sugar.
The improvement of Doctor Turrell (Fairdale) (before mentioned) was just below Mr. Shelp's. It was purchased by the Wallbridges (Lemuel and son Henry), and sold by them to John Robertson; the lot being the southern limit of the lands of R. H. Rose.

1870 census: Retired farmer.

Will. 8-13-1881 On file under Susquehanna County Historical Society. "To my wife Hannah Shelp the use of my property both real and personal during her natural life so far as she needs for her maintenance and support." Executers HC, CM,and CC Shelp.

From the Commemorative Biographical Record: "...he and his brother Henry cut the first bridle path between the farm and Fairdale"

1880 census LDS. The ages for Christopher and Hannah are right for Christian and Hannah but wrong for son Christopher who was married. ???? Next two entries for neighbors were Ezekiel (Ezkel) and George (Georg). Looks as though the enumerator was careless. George Green (Maria Shelp and Ida Shelp), Jacob Andre (Anna Shelp), Freeman P. Shelp and Henry Shelp were also neighbors.

Census Place:Jessup, Susquehanna, Pennsylvania
Source:FHL Film 1255196 National Archives Film T9-1196 Page 113A
RelationSexMarrRaceAgeBirthplace
Christopher SHELPSelfMMW84NY
Occ:FarmerFa: NYMo: NY
Hannah SHELPWifeFMW80NY
Occ:Keeping HouseFa: NYMo: NY
Christopher SHELPSonMSW29PA
Fa: NYMo: NY
Katy LINDSLEYOtherFSW20VA

SHELP, CHRISTIAN (1860 U.S. Census)
Pennsylvania, SUSQUEHANNA, JESSUP TWP
Age 63, Male, Race: White, Born: NY
Series: M653 Roll: 1186 Page: 749






 
Shelp, Christian 3rd (I10073474771)
 
119

Christian,Jr. and Henry Pruyne both moved from Charlestown, NY (In various places Christian is said to have moved from New Milford) to Dutch Hill in 1812. Bought 400 acres from Dr. Rose next to Wallbridge property. Both buried in Fair Hill cemetery.
From DAR manual, p.62: Christian Shelp (1760-1825) served a private under Captains Snooks, Yates, and McMasters, Colonels Nelson and Fisher, Tryon County New York Rangers. He died in Jessup, PA.

From Betty Arnesen: "From Georgia Olivet Judd's search of the records in Wash. DC"
Christian Shelp's Rev. War Service
Private in the Rangers of Tryon County NY militia in Col. Frederick Nelson's 3rd Reg. He served in Capt. Wm. Swoop's Co, Col. Fisher's reg.
Enlisted:
July 8, 1780 in Capt. Robert Yates' Co.
July 5, 1783 in 3rd Reg. Tryon Co. David McAllister's Co. Ref certificate of NY State, Vol 7, nos 31202, 31249,30754, 30758. Vol 6-30273. Certificate in War Dept. Adjutant General Office- July 5, 1783.

From "The King's Royal Regiment on New York" , Cruikshank, The Ontario Historical Society, Toronto, 1931. Reprinted 1984: (Provided by James F. Morrison).
SHELLOP, Christian. b. Am. 1762. Private. Enlistment Date in KRR NY: 8-7-1781. 5'8".

(His son Nathaniel noted to have been a Tory. See his notes)

Also in "The New Loyalist Index" filed under Donna Barrett Christian and Henry Shellop enlisted in the KRR of NY 28 Feb. 1884.

Could this have been some other Christian Shelp entirely?


Also from Mr. Morrison, "Muster Roll of Capt John Winn's
company of Rangers Raised in the County of Tryon and State of NY, now in the service of the said State of NY". Among the names of the privates is: Christian Shillip, date of enlistment : Sept. (I think) 9, 1776. (Microfilm Reel 78, Revolutionary War Rolls 1775-1783, National Archives, Washington DC. Doc on file under Donna Barrett.
How does this fit with the above?

Also from Mr. Morrison. "Colonel Marinus Willett's Letter and Orderly Book, Fort Rensselaer (Fort Plain), 1781". Document No. 15705, NY State Library, Albany. There are two lists appended. One contains the entry "______Shellups, House and barn, grain 300" and the other "Fred Shulp, 1 log house, one frame barn, Wheat 500, Peas 100, Oats 200, Hay Ton 8, Indian Corn 150, Horses 6, Horned Cattle 8, Sheep 10, Hogs 10".


According to Margaret Shelp Fauteux "An examination of our oldest index of Wills and Administrations (1787-1905) in this office discloses no estate under the name of Christian Shelp." He had moved to PA.

From " The History of Susquehanna County, Pennsylvania" by Stocker p.358.
The first settlers on the hill...were Lemuel Wallbridge and his son Henry...natives of CT who located near the summit about 1812. They also bought the Doctor Turrell farm, below them, and Henry Wallbridge first improved the Jagger farm. About the same time Christian Shelp, a Mohawk Dutchman, came from New Milford where he had settled after moving from NY, and bought four hundred acres of the Rose lands between the above two places. His father-in-law, Henry Pruyne, who had settled in Great Bend in 1810, came with him.The latter was a Rev war soldier and a pensioner....Christian Shelp had sons named John, Nathaniel, Henry, Christian Jr, and Stephen. Henry afterwards lived on the farm which his father had occupied many years. Charles Davis, a son-in-law of Shelp, located in the same neighborhood, and, as these settlers were permanent, the locality took the name of "Dutch Hill" which it has retained to the present. p.495: members of the Shelp family noted as pioneer members of the Fair Hill Methodist Episcopal Church.


A Receipt Role of Fisher's Regiment, NY Militia in the County of Tryon on file "Magel": 7-5-1785. Person's name to whom paid in person: Christian Shilip (also John Gibson)

From Dalton Owens: Christened at St. Paul's Lutheran Church, Schoharie (IGI records)
Johan Christian born 10-16-1756 Schoharie Town (?christened JCW 10-10-00)
Jurgen Henrich born 8-18-1754, christened 8-25-1754, Schoharie.
Maria Elizabeth born 8-7-1759, christened Sept. 1759, Schoharie
In IGI birth spelled Schelf. (11-3-00) also in copy of original church Record


10-11-00
FamilySearch& International Genealogical Index TM v4.01 North America
IGI Record
Christian SHILLIP
Sex: M
Marriage(s):
Spouse:Jenny TRUMAN
Marriage: 1786
Montgomery, NewYork
Source Information:
Batch number: DatesSource Call No.TypePrintout Call No.Type
90190331553822FilmNONE
Sheet: 3

Fair Hill Cemetery

Located in Forest Lake Twp. near junction with Bridgewater & Jessup Twp
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Contributed and transcribed by Kenneth E. Smith
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Each line is one stone. Multi-sided stones = (1) (2) etc. a.=age year month days. Continuation lines start with an *.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
David A. Green d. July 28, 1881 a. 51y, 6m, 2d
Mary A. wife of David A. Green d. April 18, 1883 a. 51y,11m, 12d
J.S. Valentine d. Nov 18, 1902 a. 66y, 6m, 4d Sarah E. his wife 1839 - 1924
Valentine - Flossie 1875 - 1949 Harry 1873 - 1959
Robert H. Wood Pvt US Army WWII b. Oct 14, 1922 d. Feb 24, 1985
Shelp - George L. 1846 - 1931 Lucinda M. Taylor his wife 1852 - 1931
Hiram L Ball d. May 23, 1901 a. 51y, 8m, 17d Mary E. his wife d.Feb 2, 1917 a. 76y, 10m, 3d
Charles son of H & M Ball d. Feb 2, 1883 a. 20y, 5m, 13d
Brands - Harold D. 1906 - 1974 Inez 19xx (date not filled in)
Jagger - Amelia A. 1852 - 1940 Silas 1845 - 1934
Celia A. Jagger d. Nov 15, 1890 a. 64y, ?m ?d
Martha M. Daughter of Daniel & Martha Jagger d. June 27, 1862 a. 31y, 3m, 14d
Daniel Jagger d. Oct 5, 1863 a. 83y, 4m, 14d
Sarah C. wife of Benjamin Van Ness d. Feb 26, 1819 a. 23y, 1m, 23d
Alphia wife of Henry Weston d. Dec 28, 1851 a. 56y, 9m, 18d
Alice E. Cornell wife of C.B. Doolittle d. May 27, 1895 a. 37y, 7m, 10d
Harland Page son of Samuel and Eliza E. Cornell d. May 10, 1867 a. 18y, 4m
Charles B. son of S. D. and Eliza E. Cornell d. Mar 12, 1861 a. 9y, 2m, 2d
Emily T. daughter of Judson and ( ???) Mullinex d. Apr 6, 1864 a. 16y, 8m, 10d

(1)Susannah d. Dec 8, 1838 a. 20y 1m 22d
(2) Bertha H. d. Sep 3, 1833 a. 3y, 1m, 24d
* (3)Joseph d. May 27, 1839 a. 5y, 10m, 22d children of L.B. and Melinda Cornell
Anna E. ? daughter of W.L. & E.L. North d. Oct 28, 1885
(1)Mary A. wife of George W. Taylor d. Oct 26, 1893 a. 60y, 2m, 22d
(2) George W. Taylor * d. Nov 9 1895 a. 69y, 6m, 2d
Theodore R. Taylor 1862 - 1946
Mary M. wife of T.R. Taylor died May 28 1887 a.22y 11m 18d
MCLEOD Elizabeth B. 1875-1963 Willaim J. 1867-1943
Lois wife of Zephaniah Cornell died May 4 1862 a. 74y
Zephaniah Cornell died Dec 8 1871 a. 88y
Susannah wife of Zephaniah Cornell died Mar 31 1823 a. 48y 4m 11d
Mary dau of Zephaniah and Susannah Cornell died June 14 1838 a. 15y 2m 17d
Israel Cornell died Dec 9 1831 a. 25y 2m 2d
Thomas J. Cornell died Nov 1 1839 a. 30y 7d
Lorinda A. wife of Samuel D. Cornell died Sept 17 1843 a. 34y 3m 9d
(1)Samuel D. Cornell died May 15 1881 a. 73y 2m 29d
(2) Eliza E. wife of Samuel D. Cornell * died 1819 - 1915
(3) Lorinda A. wife of Samuel D Cornell died Sept 17 1843 * a. 34y 3m 12
Eunice B. dau of Zephaniah and Mary Cornell died Dec 25 1850 in the 21st year of her life
(1)Ezekial Shelp July 25 1836 - July 4 1905 Louisa Otis his wife Feb 8 1840 - Feb 26 1894
* (2)Alphonso
Aug 7 1868 - Feb 13 1894
Bessie
May18 1878 - Mar 29 1873
is their * son and daughter
(3) Augustus L
Aug 19 1863 - Sept 20 1985
Fred Shelp 1866 - 1932
* their sons
Henry Shelp died April 28 1878 a. 77y 11m 1d
Betsey E. wife of Henry Shelp died Nov 14 1860 a. 71y ? ?
Catherine L daughter of Henry and Elizabeth Shelp died June 19 1873 a. 9y 2m 7d
Johathon son of Charles and Jane M. Risley died Feb 16 1840 a. 6m 19d
Mary Ann daughter of Henry and Elizabeth Shelp died July 5 1834 a. 2y 11d
Infant son of Henry and Elizabeth Shelp died Dec 10 1829 a. 2y 11d?
Samuel M. son of John and Anna Robertson died Jan 10 1830 a. 4y 1m 11d
INFANT son and daughter of William and Celestia Robertson May 17 1816?
Emma dau of William and Celestia Robertson died Mar ?
Franklin son of John W and Hannah Robertson died 1831?
Helen M. daughter of John and Hannah Robertson died Nov 3 1863
Mary L. daughter of Dr. A and S.H. Bissell died April 5 1865
wife of F.A. Lewis died Nov 27 1894 a. 43y 17d.
BROBST - Ray L Brobst Co. H 107 US inf 1896 - 1917
BROBST - Frederick L 1901 - 1918 / Inez L 1875 - 1965 / Elmer I 1872 - 1940
John Robertson died Sept 6 1877 a. 87y
Hannah wife of John Robertson died Aug 16 1875 a. 81y
David S. Robertson 1813 - 1895
Dinia wife of David Robertson died Sept 14 1871 a. 65y
Rhoda dau of John and Hannah Robertson died NY City Apr 10 1867 a.37y
Mary Ann dau of Jeremiah and Elizabeth L Martin died Oct 20 1851 a.3y 16d
Elizabeth A. Shelp wife of M B Porter died Dec 10 1879 a. 52y 1m 19d
(1) George L Lewis died Aug 13 1907 a. 75y 4m 26d
(2) Rosanna wife of G L Lewis died July 3 * 1873 a. 48y 2d "gone but not forgotten"
Benjamin O son of Christan and Hannah Shelp died Mar 2 1861 a. 21y 1m
Margaret A dau of Christan and Hannah Shelp died Mar 4 1852 a. 26y 8m 10d
Nancy Weston ? (stone weathered badly, can't make data out)
Jane Shelp ??? (cannot make out details)
Frank M son of H N and Emily Brewster died Sept 27 1852 a. 9m 18d /
Horace son of H N and * Emily Brewster died Oct 17 1839 a. 6m 10d
Charles Weston repose in peace
Kate Ann dau of Nathan and Anna Weston died Aug 19 1837 a. 7y 11m 8d
Gilbert L son of Nathan and Anna Weston died July 24 1856 a. 1y 1m 22d
Edwin G. son of Nathaniel and Anna Weston died Aug 18 1853 a. 1y 1m 6d
Anna ? (bad shading)
John Rheinvault (bad shading, can't read)
Hiram Rosengrants (bad shading, can't read)
CANFIELD John A Canfield 1846 - 19xx Ophelia Otis his wife 1856 - 1924
Julia Inman 1891 - 1865
Rachael wife of Henry Pruyne died Mar 11 1841 a. 21y
Henry Pruyne died Sep (can't make out dates, but has a metal Revolutionary marker in front)
(1)Hannah Pruyne wife of C Shelp died Sept 9 1882 a. 82y 9m 18d
(2) Christian Shelp died Apr * 1 1881 a. 51y 1m 4d
Jane wife of Christian Shelp died Feb 1841 a.80y
Joseph Barkus (broken stone)
Phebe wife of Joseph Barkus died Feb 15 1829 a. 22y
Thomas E son of Joseph and Phebe Barkus died Aug 6 1852 a. 9y
Frederick A son of Joseph and Phebe Barkus died Aug 21 1852 17y
Cassius L Talon 1896 - 1905
(1)John P Talon died Feb 5 1901 a. 55y
(2) Climenia Talon died Dec 1 1900 a. 75y
Eliza Jane dau of John B and Sarah Hinds died Sept 9 1843 a. 14m
BARZLER Samuel 1870 -1915 William T 1864 - 1939
Orson J son of David and Phebe Green died July 6 1842 a. 6m
Polly M dau of David and Phebe Green died Oct 10 1838 a.18y 8m 18d
Samatha wife of Jesse A Patch dau of David and Phebe Green died June 17 1856 a. 22y 5m *11d
Jesse A Patch died June 29 1856 a.25y 3m 20d
Lois H dau of David and Phebe Green died Aug 3 1865 a. 29y 3m 14d
Phebe Green died Feb 8 1888 a. 87y 1m / David Green June 3 1873 a. 79y
(1)Phebe M died Dec 16 1875 a. 1y 8m 13d
(2) Frank H died Oct 27 1875 a. 4m 2d son of D L * and T E Green
(3) Myron L died Oct 12 1875 a. 3y 2m 9d
Obediah Green died Oct 16 1860 a.??
Ruth wife of Obediah Green died Oct 15 1839 a. 67y 2m 23d
VALENTINE John M 1862 - 1943 Martha A 1867 - 1939
SAUTER John Sauter 1817 - 1895 Thekla his wife 1823 - 1877 / Albert their son 1857 - 1898
* "Gone but not forgotten"
Martha Darrow born 15 July 1766 - Died 10 Oct 1854 (new stone, Revolutionary war era)
John Darrow Contential Line Rev war Dec 9 1763 - July 4 1854 (same here too)
Lovina wife of D T Stoneman dau of David and Phebe Green died Jan 29 1878 a.33y 9m 23d
Archa T son of Asa and Mary E Rheinvault died Oct 18 1869 a. 3y 2m
Eliza wife of ??


Copyright © 2000 Webmaster.
Page created 8 April 2000. Last updated 10 October 2001.




Subj: DAR Patriot Lookup: Reference Code RXZPBFK
Date: 8/13/01 6:34:37 PM Pacific Daylight Time
From: autoreply@dar.org
To: jccairns@aol.com

Dear John Cairns Williams,

A search of our Patriot Index provided the information found below.

SHELP, Christian
Birth: HL 1760
Service: NY
Rank: Pvt
Death: PA 1825
Patriot Pensioned: No
Widow Pensioned: No
Children Pensioned: No
Heirs Pensioned: No
Spouse: Jane Freeman  
Shelp, Christian Jr. (I10073474767)
 
120

01/29/2014
From Denise LAHR:

This is a tale of three neighboring families in Old Warwick Township: the Erismans, Habeckers and Ebys.

Melchior Erisman?s wife, Edith, followed through on a survey her deceased husband had obtained in 1728 for 204 acres and bought the rights to an adjacent warranted and surveyed parcel of 334 acres. On Feb. 20, 1740 she obtained patents for both parcels, making her a landed woman with 538 acres that included Pine Hill and lands on both sides of the Hammer Creek.

Meanwhile, George Eby, son of Theodorus, obtained his warrant for 150 acres southeast of the Erisman parcels along the same creek in 1733. In 1760 it was patented to Christian Eby, his eldest son.

Edith Erisman died. Daughter Magdalena had married Christian Eby, son of George. Her sisters, Anna, Barbara, and Elizabeth had married Jacob and Joseph, and John Habecker, respectively.

Anna (Erisman) and Jacob Habecker got 207 acres, consisting of most of the Pine Hill section of the warrant

Barbara (Erisman) and Joseph Habecker resided in Manor Township.

Flash forward to 1789 when Jacob Habecker died. He left a very controlling will (F-1-105) dated 1784: His only son, Jacob Habecker Jr. was given 170 acres. Daughter Elizabeth was to get the other 100 acres together with ?a locked chest with all its contents and no one else is allowed to search the same. She also got the remaining 100 acres and a good ?bed.? By the time of probate, Elizabeth was married to Jacob ?Old Jock? Eby. The children had the land resurveyed and found an additional 80 acres!

Meanwhile, in 1890, Christian Eby, sold the Eby 150 acres to Jacob Shaeffer, and that land passed out of the family. Son? Old Jock? didn?t need it because he had land from his wife.

Old Jock and Elizabeth had three sons: Abraham, Daniel and Jacob (Grobschmeid). The boys appointed a group of trusted neighbors to divide up the land ?according to the places where they now live.?

Here?s where Hannes Eby saved the day. Abraham?s only son, Jacob (what else), died young in 1841. He left a widow, Susanna (Grube), and a daughter, Fianna, 11 months old when he died.

After that, Abraham gave his share to brother Jacob (Grobschmeid) and moved west to Sugar Creek, Ohio. His wife was called Catherine in the deed, which threw me a bit, because her gravestone says Maria C. It turns out that she was literate and signed her name in Old German ?Catarina Maria.? Thank goodness I learned to read that stuff.

Daniel, I believe, went to Allen County, Indiana. Fortunately, I am going to Indiana in March and can research there.

Anyway, by 1845, all but Jacob had skedaddled west. Jacob remained behind and died in 1858. The property went to his son, John. [I believe there was another son, David, who went west to Sugar Creek and Uncle Abraham.] John left a son, Jacob who died in 1935.

That?s the broad strokes. It needs a lot more work.....

.....I will be putting it into a much more formal format with sources. Maybe even a paper for the Lancaster Mennonite Historical Society. Meanwhile you have the gist of it.

When working on Hannes Eby, I was dreadfully afraid of making mistakes. And I'm sure I did make some, but I always tried to say only what I was pretty darn sure of......

....In my work on this, I have also been forced to look at Jacob Eby's family, and I will be trying to sort out more of what happened to George Eby's other descendants.

I can't wait to get to Indiana and Ohio now.

Denise

 
Eby, Abraham (I271987796759)
 
121

!Janice has a question mark after the name of Stoner...I guess she's not
certain this was her name.

 
Stoner, Magdalene (I646006950)
 
122 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Boykin, Frank William (I272008484218)
 
123

" Kalioka had four children by Young Gaines, an early settler who came into the Mobile area in the 1780's. Gaines received Spanish land grants and ran large herds of cattle freely on Indian land. He also had a white family, which included a daughter, Ann, who married George S. Gaines, an agent at the Choctaw Trading House.

.......as an Indian country-man, he witnessed treaties and was a paid interpreter for the Choctaw Trading House at St. Stephens where he sold corn, cowhides , and beef.

....Of the four children born to Kalioka and Young Gaines, more is known of Rose, the eldest daughter who stayed in the Mississippi Territory, than of their sons, Jerry and Isaac, who went west with their mother. " Daughter Ann (by Kalioka) died at an early age. **

** From book, "They Say the Wind is Red"  
Gaines, Ann Lawrence (I272008484048)
 
124

"The first recorded Abernethy in America was William Abernathy who settled in Connecticut before 1650. He was followed by Robert Abernethy in 1652 who was among many prisoners of war whom Cromwell had transported after the Battle of Dunbar where he had fought under General David Leslie. Robert was sent to Virginia, survived the dreadful voyage and suffered five years of indentured servitude. Once released he married, acquired some land, and appears in the records of Charles County Court as a petitioner about ownership of cattle. In time he became a prosperous landowner, and in turn had an indentured servant working for him. Robert and his wife Sara had many children and established an Abernethy line in Virginia, which expanded into North Carolina and elsewhere in the southeastern United States." 
Abernathy, Robert I (I543657046)
 
125

09/2013

Description: Louis P Shewfelt was married to Mary Ann born Ireland according to the 1860 census

According to some of her childrens records her name was Mary Joynt

Anne Baines
annembaines@gmail.com

 
Shufelt, Louis P (I8803691911)
 
126

152503



152503





152503

 
Reusser, Christina (I646013459)
 
127

161882
His birth date is established from the archives at Bern, Switzerland and
he lived at Ober-Deissbach, on the north slope of the Buchhalterberg.
****
The source of much Brenneman history is The Brenneman Family of America,
by Professor Albert Harwell Gerberich. Printed by Mennonite Publishing
House, Scottsdale, Pennsylvania, 1938.
Had 7 children, who were aged 1.5-15in 1672. Four sons' names are given;
were the other 3 girls?
His home is supposed to have been at Ober-Diessbach on the north slope of
Buchhalterberg, somewhere near Zurich or Bern.
A letter written 1 Jan 1672 refers to him livingin a village of Swiss
Mennonite refugees in Griesheim, Germany, in Rhein-Hessen 40 miles NW of
Worms. He owned one horse, one trundle bed and bedding, and 43
rix-dollars. There were 53 families in the village, all poor.
While in Switzerland, he refused to abjure the Mennonite belief, was
warned and finally imprisoned in the Castle of Thun in 1659. He fled from
Switzerland to Griesheim, twenty miles northwest of the city of Worms, in
Germany in 1671, probably because of the strict Swiss government mandate
of 1670.
We next hear of him in 1671 when he left Switzerland, bound for Germany.
He was 40 years old and his wife 35. There were 7 children between the
ages of 18 months and 15 years. His worldly possessions consisted of one
horse, one trundle bed and bedding, and 43 rix-dollars. He had been
fortunate to escape with his life. He ended up at Grieshem, which was
located 20 miles northwest of the city of Worms. William Penn visited
Griesheim in September of 1677, told of his plan to form a haven, etc.
Melchior the Exile did not go, but his son Melchior the *Emigrant* did.


They probably never returned to Switzerland.

 
Brenneman, Melchior II (I646013458)
 
128

1830 United States Federal Census about Sylvester R Thomson
Name: Sylvester R Thomson
[Sylvene R Thornton]
Home in 1830 (City, County, State): Freedom, Cattaraugus, New York
Free White Persons - Males - 5 thru 9: 2
Free White Persons - Males - 20 thru 29: 1
Free White Persons - Males - 40 thru 49: 1
Free White Persons - Males - 80 thru 89: 1
Free White Persons - Females - 10 thru 14: 1
Free White Persons - Females - 15 thru 19: 3
Free White Persons - Females - 40 thru 49: 1
Free White Persons - Under 20: 6
Free White Persons - 20 thru 49: 3
Total Free White Persons: 10
Total - All Persons (Free White, Slaves, Free Colored): 10



1850 Census Yorkshire, Cattaraugus, New York as Sylvanus THORNTON living with Thomas and Rachel WALKER. Not sure who they are to Sylvanus...???
1860 Census Yorkshire, Cattaraugus, New York as Slvenius THORNTON living with Orrin and Ann COOK. Not sure who they are to Sylvanus...??? 
Thornton, Sylvanus R or Sylvenius DD (I272008487721)
 
129

1830 United States Federal Census about Uriah Davis
Name: Uriah Davis
Home in 1830 (City, County, State): Buncombe, North Carolina
Free White Persons - Males - Under 5: 2
Free White Persons - Males - 10 thru 14: 1
Free White Persons - Males - 30 thru 39: 1
Free White Persons - Females - Under 5: 1
Free White Persons - Females - 5 thru 9: 2
Free White Persons - Females - 10 thru 14: 1
Free White Persons - Females - 15 thru 19: 2
Free White Persons - Females - 30 thru 39: 1
Free White Persons - Under 20: 9
Free White Persons - 20 thru 49: 2
Total Free White Persons: 11
Total - All Persons (Free White, Slaves, Free Colored): 11


1840 United States Federal Census about U Davis
Name: U Davis
Home in 1840 (City, County, State): Sourthern Division, Buncombe, North Carolina
Free White Persons - Males - 5 thru 9: 2
Free White Persons - Males - 10 thru 14: 1
Free White Persons - Males - 50 thru 59: 1
Free White Persons - Females - Under 5: 1
Free White Persons - Females - 5 thru 9: 1
Free White Persons - Females - 15 thru 19: 2
Free White Persons - Females - 40 thru 49: 1
Persons Employed in Agriculture: 4
No. White Persons over 20 Who Cannot Read and Write: 1
Free White Persons - Under 20: 7
Free White Persons - 20 thru 49: 1
Total Free White Persons: 9
Total All Persons - Free White, Free Colored, Slaves: 9 
Davis, Uriah (I111)
 
130

2nd Marriage To Roy

Washington, Marriage Records, 1865-2004 about Roberta E Rockwell
Name: Roberta E Rockwell
Spouse: Gerald A Broten
Marriage Date: 17 Sep 1963
Marriage Place: Grays Harbor
Reference Number: swgrhmc27566 
Family F557254560
 
131

4. Farmington.



JOHN HART, of Farmington, eldest son of Deacon Stephen Hart, of Braintree, Eng., Cambridge, Mass., Hartford and Farmington, Conn., born , in England, married Sarah . They resided in Farmington, where he was made a freeman by the General Court, at their May session, 1654. Sarah, his wife, joined the church at Farmington, Oct. 19th, 1653; he was admitted to the church April 2d, 1654. He was one of the first settlers of Tunxis, and bought his house lot of the original owners, and among the list of the eighty- four proprietors of 1672, is numbered the "Estate of John Hart." At the October session of the General Court, in 1660, a committee was raised to examine " Thirty Mile Island," with the view of settlement, when John Hart, of Farmington, was elected one of said committee. His sad and untimely death occurred on this wise, viz.: his house, which was located near the center of the village, was fired in the night by Indians, and he and all his family, with the exception of his eldest son, John, who was that night at Nod, or Northington, since called Avon, looking after the stock on a farm they owned there, perished in the flames. What aggravated the public calamity was the burning of the town records, at the same time. The General Court made diligent search among the Tunxis tribe for the incendiaries, but this neither restored life nor records. This fire occurred , 1666.

[This fire may not have occurred as described here. Research by David Mauro published in the July/August 1997 issue of Hart Historical Notes seems to show that no Indians were involved. Dr. C. Bickford of the Connecticut Historical Society is quoted: " The 19th century accounts of Farmington contain a lot of fiction. With- out any corroborating evidence to support Andrew's story, I had to conclude that it was without substance."

There may have been a fire of unknown origin, though. From the "Hart Family History, Silas Hart, His Ancestors and Descendants." by William Lincoln Hart, 1942, Alliance, Ohio, page 17:

"The Rev. Samuel Danforth, pastor of the first church in Roxbury kept a diary, and under the date of February 11, 1666 (O.S.) appears the following entry: "Tidings came to us from Connecticut how that on ye 15th of 10M66 Sergeant Hart, ye son of Deacon Hart and his wife, and six children were all burned in their house at Farmington, no man knowing how the fire was kindled, neither did any of the neighbors see ye fire till it was past remedy. The church there had kept a fast at this man's house two days before. One of his sons being at a farm, escaped the burning." "

]
BRANCH OF JOHN HART FOLLOWS, THEIR CHILDREN BEING THIRD GENERATION.

8. Sarah, born in Farmington, about 1653, baptized Oct. 23d, 1653, burned to death in 1666.
9. John, born in Farmington, about 1655, baptized April 2d, 1655, saved from the fire, he being that night at Nod.
10. Steven, born in Farmington, July , 1657, baptized July 19th, 1657, burned to death in 1666.
 
Lee, John (I8220406413)
 
132

9 children. Moved to Cornwall Canada. ?due to loyalist side in Revolution per Glenn Douglas Craig Hunt letter of 5-31-1991. Also,"Holland 1760, Russell Hill, Russell Co., Ontario.


From James F. Morrison I have a pay voucher listing one Frederick Shelp as a member of Fisher's regiment, N.Y. Militia. It is from the National Archives, Washington, DC. There is a hand written note, "Post 1783".

From the Van Tiffen book there are several references to Frederick having fought for the British and moved to Canada after the war.

From Dalton Owens:

A few months later I located a book in the library of Ottawa University titled "NEW YORK IN THE REVOLUTION AS COLONY AND STATE" Second edition, Vol. 10, 1898 by James A Robert, Controller. N.Y. State. These records (see below) were compiled from Militia and payroll lists for the I st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th regiments for several counties in N.Y.

p.53 JosephShelp, 4th Regt. of the Line, Col. James Holmes.
p.181 Frederick Shilp, 3rd regt.Tyron Co.,Col. Frederick Fisher
p. 181 Frederick Shelp, "
p. 181 Christian Shilip "
p. ? Christian Shillip-, Tyron CountyRangers, Capt. John Winn's Co.
p. 194 Johanis Shilp, 2nd Regt, Ulster Co. Col. James McClaghry

...........................................................
* * Note Johanis is old German for JOHN: not yet anglised therefore either second or more likely third generation Palatine.
One of the first references I have to a Shelp in Canada is included in a list of emmigrant applicants who received land grants from several land boards in the old Lunenberg District of Upper Canada in 1793 for Stormont, and Dundas Counties.

Reel C- 14028. Vol. 15 #47

FREDERICK SHELP, Emmigrant, United States, 200 acres, 18,03,1793
The inference is that Frederick received land in one of these two counties (Stormont or Dundas). However, the nominal index to the land patents for Ontario for the period 1790-1825 show Frederick Shelps , 200 acres, Conc 6, Lot 8 in Yonge Twp., Leeds Co. Johnston District on June 7, 1803- (MS I Reel 6). However, by 1813 the land was in other hands.

Frederick without doubt had several brothers and/or cousins. Two men named Shelp were members of a Loyalist Regt. called the KINGS RANGERS OF NEW YORK and are mentioned in the rolls of the second battalion ( W.O. 28, Pt 4. C-1 1858 ), as well as in the UEL lists (J.F. Pringle 1890, Comwall) for Lunenberg or the Old Eastern District of Upper Canada. The names mentioned in both records are Cpl. Henry Shellop and private Christian Shellop.
There is some confusion in my mind as to whether these two men deserted and went over to the side of the Americans during the rebellion (1776-1783). This is confirmed somewhat by the fact that there is no record, that either of these two men or their descendants applied for land grants as UEL's or sons & daughters of UEL's as was their right. These records are very complete for Upper Canada. I have not yet managed to resolve this problem. It is interesting to note that the American census for 1810 (IGI) lists only two Shelps as head of families: these include a Henry Shelp of Montgomery Co.N.Y.. and a Christopher Shelp of Cayuga Co also N..Y.



Additional data: Frederick Shallop (Shelp) married Rosannah (Susannah) Harington (Harrington) in Schodack Twp, Albany County, N.Y. on Aug. 20, 1790.

Frederick had three brothers Henry (Hendrik), Christian and Joseph and 2 sisters Margaret and Elizabeth (also a third?). The Henry and Christian Shellop who served with the Kings Rangers (a U.E.L. Regiment-see above) were two of his brothers. Both Frederick and Joseph as well as their father Christian served with the American Rebels in the line regiments of New York. The two brothers with the U.E.L.'s returned to their families in the U.S. in 1783 in the last days of the war. Joseph ended up in Vermont by 1790 and Frederick came to Canada that same year. His sister Margaret married John Gibson and Elizabeth married Issac Deline and remained in the Mohawk valley of N.Y. Christian and his wife went to Pennsylvania. Henry remained with his family in Montgomery Co., in the Mohawk Valley.


The Shelp family (originally spelled as Schulf is from the Palatine area of Germany. They were among the late arrivals in N.Y. from Germany and came to the Mohawk Valley about 1765. Three of the children are believed to have been bom in Holland. It is supposed to have taken the family several years to travel from Germany to Antwerp, get a ship to England and then on to America. This why some confusion exists as to their heritage being German or Dutch. It is also the fact that most of the Germans from the Palatine were members of the DUTCH CHURCH. 
Shelp, Frederick (I10073474766)
 
133

A Claim Against the Estate of Robert Abernathy
3 February, Charles City Co., VA

p.10 ...Also attachmt to Ben Foster agst est of Robt Abernathy for 200 lb tobo on ret of non es enventus

Fleet, Beverly, Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Volume III, p. 361 (Charles City County Court Orders and Fragments, 1664-1696): 1988 Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, Maryland, originally published in 1937 and 1949 by mimeograph. Reproduced on Family Archive CD #503 (Genealogical Records: Colonial Virginia Records, 1600s-1700s).

Transcribed by Margaret Ogilvie 
Abernathy, Robert I (I543657046)
 
134

Abernathy Document
Patent
Sir William Berkeley, Governor of Virginia
to
Robert Abernathe
Charles City County, Virginia
7 March 1665/6


VA Land Office Patents No. 5, p. 567



To all & Whereas & Know ye that I the said Sir William Berkeley Knight Governor & give and grant unto Robert Abernathe one hundred Acres of Land in the County of Charles City and on the South Side of the James River, and on the head of the poplar run where it boundeth on the Land of James Wallis, South on the Land of Thomas Duglas, and the Quarter Land and West into the Woods and South Southwest on the head with marked trees. The said Land being part of a patent that was greater & Dividend granted to Patrick Jackson and Richard Barker and by the said Jackson out of his part sold unto the said Abernathe. To have and To hold & To be held & yielding and Paying & Provided & dated the Seventh of March one thousand six hundred and sixty five.


Transcribed by Margaret Ogilvie 
Abernathy, Robert I (I543657046)
 
135

Abernathy Document
The Cow Document

View copy of recorded document

p. 98. to the wor'll Com'rs of Charles City Com at the Co'rt at Westov'r the 3rd of Apr 1657...

p.98. These presents witnes that I Robt Abernethy Do consent and agree the my now wife Sara Abernethy do make over to her child Sara Cubishe one cow called Goodluck and a heyfer called Browne and another heyfer called Jug to remaine for the use and good of the child, and if it please God to call this child by death when the next child to succeed heire to its sister, And this we desire to be recorded in Co'rt wittnes our hands this 3d of Aprill 1657

Robt x Abernathie, Sara x Abernathie her m'k.

Ack in Court same date. Rec 25 Apr. 1657

Fleet, Beverly, Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Volume III, p. 183 (Charles City County Court Orders, 1655-1657): 1988 Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, Maryland, originally published in 1937 and 1949 by mimeograph. Reproduced on Family Archive CD #503 (Genealogical Records: Colonial Virginia Records, 1600s-1700s).

Transcribed by Margaret Ogilvie 
Abernathy, Robert I (I543657046)
 
136

Alabama, Deaths and Burials Index, 1881-1974 about Dorsey Weaver
Name: Dorsey Weaver
Birth Date: abt 1871
Death Date: 25 Feb 1944
Death Place: Mcintosh, Washington, Alabama
Death Age: 73
Gender: Male
FHL Film Number: 1908781 
Weaver, Dorsey L Sr (I272008484503)
 
137

Alabama, Deaths and Burials Index, 1881-1974 about Ellen Snow
Name: Ellen Snow
[Ellen Seals]
Birth Date: abt 1856
Birth Place: Miss.
Death Date: 17 Oct 1921
Death Place: Washington, Alabama
Burial Date: 18 Oct 1921
Cemetery Name: Reeds Chapel
Death Age: 65
Occupation: Housewife
Race: Black
Marital Status: Married
Gender: Female
Father Name: Ben Seals
Spouse Name: Milton Snow Sr
FHL Film Number: 1703646 
Seals, Ellen (I272008484693)
 
138

Alabama, Deaths and Burials Index, 1881-1974 about Frank Snow
Name: Frank Snow
Birth Date: abt 1891
Death Date: 14 Mar 1956
Death Place: Mcintosh, Washington, Alabama
Death Age: 65
Gender: Male
Father Name: Milton Snow
Mother Name: Ellen
FHL Film Number: 1908915 
Snow, Frank (I272008484713)
 
139

Alabama, Deaths and Burials Index, 1881-1974 about James Edward Chastang
Name: James Edward Chastang
Birth Date: abt 1877
Death Date: 14 May 1930
Death Place: Frankville, Washington, Alabama
Burial Place: Malcolm
Death Age: 53
Gender: Male
Father Name: Jeriom Chastang
Mother Name: Nealie Johnston
FHL Film Number: 1908478 
Chastang, James Edward (I272008484633)
 
140

Alabama, Deaths and Burials Index, 1881-1974 about Lydia Lucinda Sullivan
Name: Lydia Lucinda Sullivan
[Lydia Lucinda Evans]
Birth Date: abt 1828
Death Date: 25 Jun 1910
Death Place: Washington, Alabama
Death Age: 82
Gender: Female
Father Name: Gade Evans
Mother Name: Penni Evans
FHL Film Number: 1894079 
Evans, Lydia Lucinda (I272008484815)
 
141

Also reportedly died in Botetourt Co, VA. 
Stover, Jacob P. (I645960365)
 
142

American Revolutionary War Rejected Pensions about Mashack Davis
Name: Mashack Davis
State: North Carolina
Location: --, Haywood
Reason: Three certificates from the Comptroller of North Carolina to M. Davis as proof of service in this case, which are not regarded as conclusive.
 
Davis, Meshack (I65)
 
143

At the beginning of the 19th century, industrialization, urbanization, and immigration contributed to the explosive growth of New York City. Accompanying this growth was a burgeoning underclass of convicts, the poor, the sick, and the insane. A policy of institutionalization was adopted to manage this group. In 1828, New York City purchased an island in the East River from the Blackwell family to build a jail and an asylum. When it opened in 1839, the asylum on Blackwell?s Island was New York?s first publicly funded mental hospital and the first municipal mental hospital in the United States.

It was designed to be a state-of-the-art institution based on the theories of moral treatment. Fundamental to its success was an organized and orderly environment. Although in the past, little effort was made to differentiate between types of mental illness, according to the tenets of moral treatment, such distinctions were imperative. As Dr. John McDonald, a physician involved with the design of the new asylum, wrote, ?The indiscriminate mingling of the mild and furious, clean and filthy, convalescent and idiotic, need only be witnessed to be deprecated.? He continued: ?Classification is now justly considered by almost all persons of experience of the first importance in the treatment of insanity? (1). He suggested that patients be divided into four specific classes: the ?noisy, destructive, and violent,? ?the idiots,? ?the convalescents,? and an intermediate class for ?those in the first stages of convalescence and such incurables (who) are harmless and not possessed of bad habits? (2). In addition to classification, moral treatment emphasized the human rather than beast-like nature of the insane. The design for the new asylum was free of barricades and iron bars and allowed for easy access to the outdoors.

But this model asylum was never built. Because of financial constraints, only two wings were completed and almost immediately proved inadequate. Even more disturbing, convicts from the nearby penitentiary were used as guards and attendants, so that in the words of Dr. Thomas Kirkbride, the patients were ?abandoned to the tender mercies of thieves and prostitutes? (3).

Thousands of the city?s poor mentally ill were admitted to the asylum between 1839 and 1895, and the press?s fascination with the institution and its inhabitants grew intense during those years. Local newspapers, including the New York Times and Harpers Weekly, provided weekly running accounts of the asylum?s most intriguing characters. Some achieved celebrity-like status, such as the elderly woman known as ?Mrs. Buchanan.?

Most people have heard of Mrs. Buchanan. She is one of the incurables?a poor old lady?Scotch I imagine?who has been an inmate of the lunatic asylum for years. Her delusion has been described in the papers. She believes she is the wife of the President and discharges her conjugal duties with such success that she bears a large family to the President. Strange to say, the offspring of her lofty amours are invariably cats. I had the honor of stroking the back of President Buchanan?s eldest son who purred as though his sire had no political difficulties to disturb his repose. (4)

Newspapers were filled with grim tales of madness, mistreated patients, wretched conditions, and wrongful confinement. In 1879, an article titled ?Tormenting the Insane? appeared in the New York Times describing appalling cases of neglect. In 1887, Elizabeth Cochrane Seamen, aka Nellie Bly (1866?1922), a journalist for the New York World, feigned insanity to gain admission to the asylum on Blackwell?s Island. She wrote a series of shocking articles for the newspaper and a book. She described it as a ?human rat-trap? that could drive the sanest people crazy (5).

In the wake of the scathing report, administrative changes followed, but the image of the asylum as a human rat trap lingered. The half-built, overcrowded, convict-supervised asylum was a symbol for the unrealized goals and the blatant failures so extensively covered in the press. The New York City Lunatic Asylum on Blackwell?s Island closed in 1894. All that remains of it today is a domed octagonal structure that once stood as the centerpiece of the institution.

1.Board of Assistant Aldermen: Document 101, March 10, 1934: Documents of the Board of Aldermen and Board of Assistants of the City of New York. New York, the Board, 1831?1834, p 8172.Board of Assistant Aldermen: Document 101, March 10, 1934: Documents of the Board of Aldermen and Board of Assistants of the City of New York. New York, the Board, 1831?1834, p 8203.Kirkbride TS: Proceedings of the Third Meeting of the Association of Medical Superintendents of American Institutions for the Insane, Article V. New York, July 1848, p 914.A Visit to the lunatic asylum on Blackwell?s Island. Harper?s Weekly, March 19, 1859, p 1865.Nellie Bly: Ten Days in a Madhouse?Feigning Insanity in Order to Reveal Asylum Horrors. New York, Norman Munro, 1887, p 93
References

Address correspondence and reprint requests to Dr. Boardman, Weill Cornell Medical College, 449 East 68th St., 2nd Fl., Suite 9, New York, NY 10021; samboardmanmd@nyc.rr.com (e-mail). Images courtesy of Oskar Diethelm Library, Institute for the History of Psychiatry, Weill Cornell Medical College. The authors report no competing interests. 
Crowley, Mary (I8177510279)
 
144

Bibliography
English anatomist, physiologist, and surgeon, born April 3, 1764, London; died April 28, 1831, Enfield.
Biography of John Abernethy

John Abernethy was the son of a merchant. He went to school in Wolverhampton, but in 1778 left school to go to London. In 1779, only 15 years of age, he was apprenticed to Sir Charles Blicke (1745-1815), a surgeon who was associated with St. Bartholomew's Hospital and had a large practice. Since no lectures in anatomy were held at the St. Bartholomew's at the time, he attended lectures by Dr Maclaurn and Sir William Blizard (1743-1835) at the London Hospital. He soon became their assistant, while also attending the lecture of the famous Sir John Percivall Pott (1714-1788) at St. Bartholomew's, and by John Hunter (1728-1793).

When Pott retired he was succeeded by Blicke. In July 1787 Abernethy took over his post as assistant surgeon, and became teacher of anatomy, physiology, pathology, and surgery. Much of his importance as a teacher lies in his recognition of the importance of comparative anatomy in the study of anatomy and physiology.

Because of lack of suitable rooms he had to give his lectures outside the hospital, in his own rooms. Because of the large number of students who flocked to his lectures, an auditorium was built for Abernethy at the hospital in 1790 and 1791. He thus became the founder of St. Bartholomew's Hospital Medical School. He is also credited the establishment of the excellent museum of pathological anatomy at the hospital.

The early 1790's was a busy period for Abernethy, as he did anatomical works and conducted physiological experiments besides his work at the hospital. In 1793, the year of John Hunter's death, his first article was printed in the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Abernethy was a devoted pupil and disciple of John Hunter whom he succeeded at St. Bartholomew's Hospital.

In 1813 Abernethy became surgeon at Christ's Hospital, a position he held until 1828, shortly before he abandoned his practice. In 1814 he was appointed professor of anatomy and surgery at the Royal College of Surgeon, and, in 1815, after 28 years as assistant surgeon, he became Surgeon to St. Bartholomew's Hospital.

Abernethy was now at the peak of his career, running an extensive practice and still an exceptionally popular lecturer. His lectures in anatomy, physiology, surgery, and pathology were considered unequalled. They were, in fact, so popular that they were taken down by fast writers and published in the Lancet in 1826 and 1827 - whereby the publisher was sued by Abernethy. Complying with student's wishes, he published Lectures on anatomy, surgery and pathology... in 1828 and Lectures on the theory and practice of surgery in 1830. Although he was a generous man he deliberately assumed a brusque manner with his patients, assuming it would inspire their confidence.

Abernethy was a skilled surgeon. Continuing Hunter's work on ligation, he became the first to tie successfully the external iliac artery for aneurism, and in 1798 he ligated the common carotid. Like great colleagues as William Cheselden (1688-1752) and John Hunter, however, he only operated when absolutely necessary. Over the years his reluctance to take up instruments increased, and in 1827 he laid down his post as surgen at the St. Bartholomew's, and in 1829 retird from his chair at the Royal Colle of Surgeons. He then moved to Enfield, where he owned a house, and died there on April 20, 1831, at the age of 67, after a protracted period of illness.

His publishing covered a wide field. One of his books concerned the anatomy of the whale.

A selection of quotations:

«One day, for example, a lady took her daughter, evidently most tightly laced, a practice which we believe mothers now are aware of is mischievous, but scarcely to the extent known to medical men. She complained of Abernethy?s rudeness to her, as well she might; still he gave her, in a few words, a useful lesson. «Why, Madam,» said he, «do you know there are upward of thirty yards of bowels squeezed underneath that girdle of your daughter?s? Go home and cut it; let nature have fair play, and you will have no need of my advice.»
Quoted by George Macilwain in Memoirs of John Abernethy, chapter 33.

«Private patient?s, if they do not like me, can go elsewhere; but the poor devils in the hospital I am bound to take care of.»
Quoted by George Macilwain in Memoirs of John Abernethy, chapter 5.

«There is no short cut, nor «royal road,» to the attainment of medical knowledge. The path which we have to pursue is long, difficult, and unsafe. In our progress, we must frequently take up our abode with death and corruption; we must adopt loathsome diseases for our familar associates, or we shall never be thoroughly acquainted with their nature and dispositions; we must risk, nay even injure, our own health in order to be able to preserve or restore that of other.»
Hunterian oration, 1819.

«Pray, Mr. Abernethy, what is a cure for gout?» was the question of an indolent and luxurious citizen. «Live upon a sixpence a day - and earn it,» was the cogent reply.
Quoted by Thomas J. Pettegrew in Medical Portrait Gallery, Volume II.

«The hospital is the only proper College in which to rear a true disciple of Aesculapius.
Quoted by Thomas J. Pettegrew in Biographical Memoirs.

«Mr. Abernethy,» sais a patient, «I have something the matter, Sir, with this arm. There, oh! (making a particular motion with the limb), that, Sir, gives me great pain.» «Well what a fool you must be to do it then,» said Abernethy.
Quoted by George Macilwain in Memoirs of John Abernethy, chapter 33.

«Abernethy, leaving his house, kicked his foot against a paving stone where the road was under repair. He shouted to a workman (who was Irish) to take it out of the way. «And where shall I take it?» asked the Irishman. «Take it to H-ll for all I care.» «May be,» said the Irishman, «if I Take it to Heaven it will be more out of your Honor?s way.»
Quoted by Howard Marsh in
St. Barholomew?s Hospital Journal, 1904, 2: 89.

To the daughter of a widowed patient: « I have witnessed your devotion and kindness to your mother. I am in need of a wife, and I think you are the very person that would suit me. My time is essentially occupied, and I have therefore no leirsure for courting.. Reflect upon this matter until Monday.»*.
Quoted by Samuel D. Gross in Autobiography.
*She did, and subsequently became Mrs. Abernethy

«Various advantages result even from the publication of opinions; for though we are very liable to error in forming them, yet their promulgation, by exciting investigation, and pointing out the deficiencies of our information, cannet be otherwise than useful in the promotion of science.»
Surgical and Physiological Works, Volume I, Preface.

We thank Ian Elis for information submitted.
 
Abernethy, Doctor John (I1218875683)
 
145

Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Ischua ? Chapter XLIX (49)

Page 1140

Surnames: THORNTON, STEWART, OSGOOD, DENSMORE, CHASE, WILLIAMS, MOON

Lyman is a son of Alonzo R. THORNTON, who came from Waterloo, N.Y., and married Phebe STEWART, of Yorkshire. Phebe, their only child, married Stephen OSGOOD, of Ischua. Mr. THORNTON?s second wife, Adeline, was a sister of his first; children: Lucy, Melinda, Lyman M., Zylpha A., and John. Alonzo was a shoemaker in Ischua many years and died here in 1886. Lyman M. was born in Yorkshire in 1846. He enlisted in 1862 in the 154th N.Y. Vols. and was in the battles of Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, and Lookout Mountain. Soon after the latter he was taken sick. At the close of the war he bought the ashery of Anson DENSMORE, run it a year, and sold it. In 1865 he married Delina A., daughter of James CHASE, of Lyndon; children: Frank C., of Ischua; Mildred (Mrs. Morris D. WILLIAMS), of Salamanca; and Fred G. Mrs. THORNTON died in 1874 and he married, second, Mrs. Ann E. MOON, whose son Archie D., has been his partner in general mercantile business for several years under the firm name of A. D. MOON & Co.
 
Thornton, Alonzo Charles (I272008487723)
 
146

Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Ischua ? Chapter XLIX (49)

Page 1140

Surnames: THORNTON, STEWART, OSGOOD, DENSMORE, CHASE, WILLIAMS, MOON

Lyman is a son of Alonzo R. THORNTON, who came from Waterloo, N.Y., and married Phebe STEWART, of Yorkshire. Phebe, their only child, married Stephen OSGOOD, of Ischua. Mr. THORNTON?s second wife, Adeline, was a sister of his first; children: Lucy, Melinda, Lyman M., Zylpha A., and John. Alonzo was a shoemaker in Ischua many years and died here in 1886. Lyman M. was born in Yorkshire in 1846. He enlisted in 1862 in the 154th N.Y. Vols. and was in the battles of Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, and Lookout Mountain. Soon after the latter he was taken sick. At the close of the war he bought the ashery of Anson DENSMORE, run it a year, and sold it. In 1865 he married Delina A., daughter of James CHASE, of Lyndon; children: Frank C., of Ischua; Mildred (Mrs. Morris D. WILLIAMS), of Salamanca; and Fred G. Mrs. THORNTON died in 1874 and he married, second, Mrs. Ann E. MOON, whose son Archie D., has been his partner in general mercantile business for several years under the firm name of A. D. MOON & Co.
 
Thornton, Lyman M (I272008487725)
 
147

BIOGRAPHY: CAPTAIN F. A. GOODELL

BIOGRAPHY: Captain F.A. Goodell, of Cleveland, is a native of the Buckeye State, having been born at Vermilion, February 18, 1854. Two months later the family removed to what was then the Territory of Washington, there living until he reached the age of twelve years, when they returned to Vermilion.
Captain Goodell attended school at Vermilion for five years, at the end of that time going on the Michael Groh as deckhand, becoming watchman and wheelsman the same year. He then went before the mast on the schooner Winona, with Captain Brown, and, leaving in October, escaped a wreck which befell the boat on its next trip. The following season he spent on its next trip. The following season he spent on the J. S. Fay as watchman, and the years closely succeeding in the S. L. Mather, Mary
Jarecki, Samson, Annie Smith, V. Swain, F. A. Morse, S. B. Conklin and Henry Fitzhugh. For one season after this he was engaged in the fish business at Vermilion, but the following year he returned to the water and sailed as mate of the P. S. March. Henow became master, and was given command of the Florida, which boat was lost at Marquette Harbor, one man also being lost. He has since sailed the P. S. Marsh, the W. S. Crosthwaite, Oregon, H. D. Alverson, and, in 1896 and 1897 the Columbia, and in 1898, steamer R. E. Schuck.
On November 30, 1880, Captain Goode(sic) was married to Miss Amelia Hinton, of Vermilion, Ohio. They have five children Marion P., William B., Fred C., Edna M. and Hattie B., all of who are in school but the youngest.
William B. Goodell, the father of Captain Goodell, was born in Hamilton, Ontario. He spent the greater part of his life on the water, being in the employ of Bradley and Minch, of Cleveland, in 1854. He had left the lakes, however, at the time of his death, which occurred December 16, 1864[sic]. He had been appointed deputy collector at Port Angelus, Wash., and served in that position only one week when he was drowned in a flood.

From Ancestry Contact: Jack N Goodell  
Goodell, Captain Frederick Agustus (I50367905073)
 
148

BRUNSWICK COUNTY, VIRGINIA - WILL BOOK 5 (partial)

Page 54

CHARLES ABERNATHY

Will Book 5, pg. 54

In the name of God amen I CHARLES ABERNATHY of the County of Brunswick knowing that it is appointed of the Lord for the sons of man all to die and being in affliction at present but of sound mind and judgment as usuall do make this my last will and Testament Revoking and Disannulling all and every other will or gift made by me and is as
followeth, Item I lend to my beloved wife the land and plantation on which I now live also one negro Girl named EDEY, the negro Girl to be during my wifes Natural live and the land during her widowhood and then to be equally divided betweeen my three last children, Item I give to my beloved wife one Bay mare called Juel, and one hunting saddle also one feather bed and furniture, one chest, one Loome, and one spinning wheel.
Item I give to my beloved son ALLEN one Bay mare called Fancey one Saddle, one sow and Piggs.
Item I give to my beloved daughter REBECCA, one feather bed and furniture also one cow.
And all my other estate after paying my just debts I leave in the care of my wife to raise up my children untill my
son DANIEL comes to the age of Sixteen years old and then to be equally divided between my wife and my three last children. And I do constiture and ordain my wife and Bror. GEORGE WILSON and Bror. JESSE LEE as Executors to this my last Will & Testament In Witness whereof I have set my hand affixed my seal this Twenty first day of May one thousand seven hundred and ninety two.

Sealed & Delivered in presents of us (Enterlines before assignes in the
original)
Jesse Lee
Jincy Abernathy
Charles Abernathy {Ss}
Milly {her mark} Davenport

Brunswick County Cout September 26th 1790

This last will & Testament of Charles Abernathy decd. was proved by the Oath of JINCY ABERNATHY and MILLY ABERNATHY formerly MILLY DAVENPORT witnesses __ out and ordered to be Recorded and on the return of ELIZABETH ABERNATHY the Executriz therein named she having made oath
thereto according to law, and together with JOHN ABERNATHY and FREDERICK ABERNATHY her securities ___ teste and acknowledged a bond in the penalty of five hundred pounds with condition as the law directs certificate is granted her for obtaining a probate thereof in __ present Liberty being named the other Executor thereof ___ to join the the said probate when they think fit.
Exam'd Teste CB Jones CBC


Submitted by Linda Lewis Lepow 
Abernathy, Charles (I543655460)
 
149

California Birth Index, 1905-1995 about Joyce Elaine Franciscus
Name: Joyce Elaine Franciscus
Birth Date: 17 Apr 1948
Gender: Female
Mother's Maiden Name: Garcia
Birth County: Santa Clara 
Francisco, Joyce Elaine (I634563076)
 
150

California, Death Index, 1940-1997 about Arthur Walter Decker
Name: Arthur Walter Decker
Social Security #: 447070826
Gender: Male
Birth Date: 29 Sep 1897
Birth Place: Missouri
Death Date: 19 Sep 1984
Death Place: Madera
Mother's Maiden Name: Shelton 
Decker, Arthur Walter (I272008479918)
 

      «Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ... 1012» Next»

Home Page |  What's New |  Most Wanted |  Surnames |  Photos |  Histories |  Documents |  Cemeteries |  Places |  Dates |  Reports |  Sources