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101

From http://genealogical-gleanings.com; Early Colonial Virginia

Robert A. Abernathy was born in 1635 in Scotland.Robert arrived in VA in 1652 after the Battle of Dunbar. He was indentured to Roger Tilghman. He married in Bristol Parish, Prince George, VA to Sarah Cabiggo or Cubisha, daughter of John Cubisha and Jane Bell. Robert died in 1685 in Prince George, VA. Robert and Sarah had a son, Robert who was born in 1660 in Prince George, VA. He married about 1685 to Christine Tilghman. It is possible that Robert A. Abernathy came to America as an indenture to Christine's father, Roger Tilghman/Tilman. Robert and Sarah had the following children: Robert, Ann, Mary, John, David, Elizabeth, William and Miles. Robert died in 1685 in Prince George, VA.

Miles Abernathy, son of Robert Abernathy b. 1695 in Charles City County, and Mary Howell or Harwell, was born in 1750 in Prince George, VA. He married about 1775 in NC to Sarah Ann Jones, daughter of Richard Jones and Elizabeth Batte. Sarah was born in Amelin, VA.Miles and Sarah had the following children: "Big" John D., Battee, Jones, Elizabeth, Carlene, Robert and Miles. Miles died in Tryon, NC in 1789.  
Abernathy, Robert I (I543657046)
 
102

From http://genealogy.romanhords.com/MVHord.html

We, Samuel Smith Hord and family, wife and two children, Viola and Adelaide, left Kentucky in the early fall for the State of Illinois in 1860. It was the year that Abraham Lincoln was elected President of the United States. One of his opponents was John Bell of Tennessee. Their platform, or party was called "Constitutional Union of the Country." Father was for them. I remember father and mother telling of my standing in the front of the wagon and ringing a little bell and saying, "Hurrah for Bell and Everett." I was nearly three years old and would be three the 16th of December of that year.

We settled 18 miles south of Bloomington, on the Illinois Central Railroad, at Wapella, DeWitt County, Illinois. We lived on a farm about two or three miles northeast of town (as near as I can remember). Sister Carrie and Brother Nate were born on this farm. Carrie was born on January 11, 186?. Nathan was born April 1, 1862. Grandma [Hannah Cadwallader] Ellis came and made us a visit from Kentucky at that time so as to be with Ma. She stayed 6 weeks and when she went home, she took Addie and me with her. Then in six more weeks, Ma came to Kentucky to get us. It was during the Civil War, and I remember her saying that she had met a body of soldiers in going from Grandfather Ellis´ home to Grandmother [Nancy Bolling] Hord´s. Now, Grandma Hord had slaves and I used to be afraid of them, for they wanted to hug Addie and me. They were little pickaninnies. I don´t know how many were at home there then. There were Henson and Harriet - they were still there and stayed on with Grandma Hord as long as they lived. They were the ones that had lived with Pa and Ma until we went to Illinois.

We moved from the farm into the town of Wapella in 1865, and during the winter, the time the soldiers were returning from the war, there was a scourge of the old Black Smallpox. Father caught it and had it so bad that it was said that he had the worst of any one person in the town. After weeks of unconsciousness he came through all right. Mother and the four children had the Varioloid, or a light form of smallpox. Father had all the pox marks, we did not have any.

In the spring or summer [of 1866], they decided to move to Missouri. Grandpa [Nathan] Ellis had moved there from Kentucky. Pa now had gained back most of his health, and did teaming. He would haul flour and feed from Clinton, Missouri, six miles away. He had a fine team of horses. He turned them out one day, and they were running and playing. One kicked the other and she had to be shot and killed, just as we were almost ready to start on our trip. Of course he had to buy another horse to match the one left. He paid $160.00 for her.

We now were ready to start our trip. Of course all the traveling was done by team and covered wagon. I don´t know how long we were on the way, but we arrived all right and well, six miles west of Pleasant Hill, Cass County, Missouri, where Grandpa Ellis lived, and were met there by the grasshoppers that were so very bad in 1866, they took every green thing. By the way, the grasshoppers came again in seven years.

Of course we had to find a place to farm and settle. Uncle Frank [Francis Triplett] Hord lived northeast of Independence, Jackson County. They had come down, and I had gone home with them. Horseback, I rode behind first one then the other, Aunt Ada [Adah Elizabeth Adams] and Uncle Frank. In a week or so they (Ma and Pa) came after me and to make a visit up there. When they got to the Old Salem Church, the horse Pa had just bought in Illinois took sick and died. Left again with one horse, and one and one half miles to Uncle Frank´s, he had to buy another horse. Pa said he would just get a cheap one. I don´t know what he paid, but he bought a blind one. He was worth his weight in gold, as the saying goes. He lived and died of old age belonging to us. His name was Old Tobe, and the other one of the team was named Old Nell.

Pa rented a place from William R. Nelson, the owner of the Kansas City Star paper. It was about one mile east of Greenwood, Jackson County, Missouri. That was the year of 1867. Sister Maude (Willie de Maude) was born there on that place August 25, 1867. Then we moved a half mile south of Grandpa Ellis´ old place. He had sold it to Perry Craig. Mr. Craig owned the place adjoining where we moved. It was known as the old Stone House, and had several tall poplar trees which could be seen for miles and miles across the prairie. We lived there three years. Pa put in a wheat crop of seventy-five acres that fall, and came back the next year to harvest and thresh. I remember it so well for Pa plowed the ground and I rode the horses and did the harrowing and Pa cut down a tree, hitched the team to it, and I dragged it all over the field. Pa sowed the wheat broadcast out of a sack swung over his shoulder, scattering it with his hand. (Whoever reads this in years to come will never have seen it done.) I went over the ground three times to get it covered good. Pa went to town - Pleasant Hill - and brought home a new sidesaddle for me. That was what I got for the job. I was sure proud of it. I used Grandma Ellis´ old saddle while at work. I came back in the harvest time and helped one of the neighbors cook for the men and helped during the threshing also.

We had moved on to 40 acres of ground that Pa had bought six miles south east of Harrisonville, Cass County, about 25 miles from where we had lived on what is known as Eight Mile Creek. Now Grandpa Ellis lived three miles and a half north of us. He built their house on the west mound. (There were two mounds only a short distance apart. A Mr. William Fightner owned the other one.) The house, as I said, was back from the road that ran north and south with a half mile of his farm west, and the road was north of that. Then the road went south on the west side of it. From the top of the mound where we went west, it turns north, and about a mile from there is a creek named "Camp Branch." I can´t remember just how far north it was to a road that turned west, and somewhere nearly a mile from there is a church and cemetery. The church was on the south side and the cemetery on the north. That is the place where Grandpa [Nathan Ellis], Grandma [Hannah] Ellis, Cousin Oka Ellis (Uncle Will Ellis´ little boy) and my mother, Cindarella Ellis Hord are buried. We moved to this place on Eight Mile in the fall of 1869. Brother Traviss Leavitt Hord was born March 11, 1870, and Jesse Clay was born December 21, 1873. We lived in a school district that the school house was called the McBride Schoolhouse, it was two miles north and east from home. Later they divided the district and we were then in the Eight Mile School District, where we finished what schooling I ever got by going to school.

When I was sixteen I taught the two years at the McBride School and the next year at Eight Mile. The fall I was 19 in December, I started to Kentucky for a visit. Aunt Lide Tolle and Uncle Jim Tolle were going through with a team of mules and a wagon. They had their three youngest children with them, Ziplha, Jim, and John. When we got as far as Decatur, Illinois, the roads were so muddy and we had such a load that I took the train to Wapella. I spent the winter there with the friends of Ma and Pa. Some of them (Bob Dunbar, a school mate of Pa´s in Kentucky, who had moved out west and now lived in Illinois; and Reverend Carrol, who helped to care for Pa and all of us when we had the Smallpox in 1865.)

Well, I never got to Kentucky. In the spring of 1877 I went to Michigan to visit Aunt Bina Hanna in Coldwater, Michigan (Branch County). She was Ma´s only sister. She had married Andrew Jackson Hanna in Missouri in 1871 I believe. They had gone back to his old home town, and it was there that I met Lafayette Arnold Sabins, and married him July 17, 1881, in Coldwater, Branch County, Michigan. Our daughter, Burza Ethel, was born in Coldwater January 17, 1883, Wednesday, 5:15 p.m. We lived on Cutter Avenue. The doctor´s name was Dr. Whitcomb, an old doctor. Then I went to Winfield, Kansas about the first of May, and Lafayette came the first day of August 1884. We lived there six years. Lyle Arnold, our son, was born in Winfield September 17, 1888, 5:45 p.m., Monday. We left Winfield, Kansas in December 1889, spent Christmas in Kansas City with Sister Adda and family, then went to Michigan.

We were there two years, then went to Harrisburg, Saline County, Illinois, where Lafayette´s brother Alonzo Sabins lived. We had sold the interest in Lafayette´s father´s estate and put it in with Lonnie in paying for a saw mill. We were in that business for about a year. We lost every dollar we put into it. Had to start over. I commenced to do sewing and had all I could do. Lafe worked at his trade as a carpenter. We stayed in Harrisburg eight years. Our children were in school there, but in the summer I sent them to their Grandpa Hord´s. Then they came back and met me at Richards, Missouri in Vernon County. They stayed at their Grandpa Hord´s during the summer of 1897.

We stayed with Uncle Jim and Aunt Lide Tolle and at John Tolle´s during that winter, then rented a house and had our things shipped to Nevada, Vernon County, Missouri. Lafayette came then from Illinois. It was there that Burza met and married Jesse N. Jones of Fort Madison, Iowa on January 20, 1900. We moved to Winfield, Kansas again. Burza and her husband went to Iowa. In 1902 we moved to Kansas City, Missouri and lived there until the World War (I - 1914) when Lyle enlisted in the Army to go to France. Then we came to Iowa to be near Burza, and were there when he came home. He was discharged March 1919. We settled in Lewis, Cass County, Iowa.  
Hord, Mary Viola (I272008483703)
 
103

From http://genealogy.romanhords.com/postbellum.html:

From Kentucky: A History of the State, Battle, Perrin, & Kniffin, 5th ed., 1887, Franklin Co.: JUDGE LYSANDER HORD came to Frankfort to read law in 1835 with Gov. Charles S. Morehead and Hon. Mason Brown. He was born in Mason County, Ky., January 16, 1817, a son of Edward and Elizabeth (Benson) Hord, natives respectively of Virginia and Bourbon County, Ky., of English extraction. His rudimentary education was obtained in the common and private schools of Mason and Clark Counties. He afterward finished his education in Centre and Augusta Colleges and began the practice of law at Frankfort, forming a partnership first with Gov. James T. Morehead and afterward with S. F. J. Trabne. He is still in the practice of law at Frankfort, but alone. He was elected police judge of Frankfort in 1845, and afterward was elected county judge and served six years. In 1850 he was elected to represent Franklin County in the Legislature, the first legislative body after the adoption of the present State constitution. He again represented the county in 1879. In 1877 he wrote and published in the Kentucky Yoeman a series of articles on the improvement of the Kentucky River, and on the management of the State penitentiary, which articles were embodied and published in pamphlet form, and led to the transfer by the State to the United States Government of the locks and dams which had been built by the State on the Kentucky River, and to the rebuilding of the old locks and dams by the Federal Government, and the extension of the slack water navigation of that river. His views as to the management of the penitentiary were adopted by Gov. Blackburn and the Legislature in 1880, of which the Judge was a member, and have resulted in a great improvement in the management of that institution, both as to the comfort of the prisoners and the finances of the State. In 1839 he was married to Miss Hannah Ann Price, a native of Frankfort, and a daughter of Richard Price (deceased), a farmer of the county and a soldier in the war of 1812. His death occurred while in the service of the country. The Judge has six children living: Elizabeth, Edward, Upshaw, Lysander, Blandiana and Hannah. The Judge is one of the oldest practicing attorneys in the county, and as a judge is respected by the legal fraternity for his honesty and integrity.
From a book of biographical sketches of Kentuckians: Judge Lysander Hord came to Frankfort to read law in 1835 with Gov. Charles S. Morehead and Hon. Mason Brown. He was born in Mason CO, KY, Jan. 16, 1817, a son of Edward and Elizabeth (Benson) Hord, natives respectively of VA and Bourbon CO., KY of English extraction. His rudimentary education was obtained in the common and private schools of Mason and Clark Counties. He afterward finished his education in Centre and Augusta Colleges and began the practice of law at Frankfort, forming a partnership first with Gov. James T. Morehead and afterward with S.F.J. Trabane. He is still in the practice of law at Frankfort, but alone. He was elected police judge of Frankfort in 1845, and afterward was elected county judge and served six years. In 1850 he was elected to represent Franklin County in the Legislature, the first legislative body after the adoption of the present Sate constitution. He again represented the county in 1879. In 1877 he wrote and published in the Kentucky Yeoman a series of articles on the improvement of the Kentucky River, and on the management of the State penitentiary, which articles were embodied and published in pamphlet form, and led to the transfer by the State to the United States Government of the locks and dams which had been built by the State on the Kentucky River, and to the rebuilding of the locks and dams by the Federal Government, and the extension of the slack water navigation of that river. His views as to the management of the penitentiary were adopted by Gov. Blackburn and the Legislature in 1880, of which the Judge was a member, and have resulted in a great improvement in the management of that institution, both as to the comfort of the prisoners and the finances of the Sate. In 1839 he was married to Miss Hannah Ann Price, a native of Frankfort, and a daughter of Richard Price (deceased), a farmer of the county and a soldier in the war of 1812. His death occurred while in the service of the country. The Judge has six children living: Elizabeth, Edward, Upshaw, Lysander, Blandina, and Hannah. The Judge is one of the oldest practicing attorneys in the county, and as a judge is respected by the legal fraternity for his honesty and integrity.
(Genealogical line: son of Edward, son of Jesse, son of Thomas, son of John)  
Hord, Judge Lysander Sr (I272008483329)
 
104

From http://jenniferhsrn2.homestead.com/mississippi.html

Chief Pushmataha was born about 1764 in the Lower Towns, or Okla Hannalli District of the Choctaw Nation. This area is also called the Six Towns, though it appears to have more than just Six Towns. The earliest published material giving details about Pushmataha?s life was by Charles Lanman in 1870. Gideon Lynceum wrote ?The Life of Apushimataha? in the end of the nineteenth century, many of the details written by Lanman are in this work. Horatio Cushman and Henry Sales Halbert also wrote of Pushmataha doing their research at about the same time, in the end of the nineteenth century. Most of Halbert?s work is unpublished, but he published several articles on the Choctaw in various journals in the early 20th century. George S. Gaines, who ran the Choctaw Trading Post, also speaks of Pushmataha in his reminisces, published about the same time as the rest. Lanman, Lynceum, Gaines, and Cushman?s work relies heavily on recollections of various sources including their own, while Halbert also takes in account various government documents including the Court of Claims testimonies. Anna Lewis also published a book on Pushmataha, like all that follow her, most is a rehashing of earlier work, but she too uses various documents in the Oklahoma and National archives in her work.

Of his personal life, it has been written he came from common parentage, attained the position of District Chief around 1805, which he retained until his death, and that he had no family. We know, and historians will agree, that Pushmataha had at least one sister, because his nephew succeeded him as Chief of the District for a short time after his death. This nephew, per Halbert, was Oka Lah Humma , most often spelled as Oklahoma, who was removed from office for his tendency to be drunk. Oka Lah Humma was succeeded by Tappena Homma, mistakenly documented as General Humming Bird. I have not at this time found a historical source to validate Oka Lah Humma as a successor.

Gaines wrote that before his fateful trip to Washington D. C., Pushmataha asked if he died, if Gaines would supply his nephew with a keg of powder to fire the guns. Gaines agreed, and gave the nephew, (whom he does not name), the keg of powder once he learned of Pushmataha?s death. It is likely, prior to Pushmataha?s death, that his nephew, Tappena Homma was, as seen in other districts, a second in command for his Uncle. Halbert writes that Tappena Homma, per Jack Amos, is buried near Pushmataha?s sister, and that Oka Lah Humma is buried in near Chunkee, in Lauderdale County.

As most of the mixed blood marriages that we can trace go back to what historian?s term the elite of the Choctaw, it appears, that by 1792, Pushmataha was growing in fame. His niece, daughter of his sister, married Charles Juzan, the son of a Frenchman in Mobile, and a trader among the Choctaws around that time. It would also be around that time that we would expect to see Pushmataha married and having a family of his own. Most of his family, both his, and his sibling?s, are hard to trace. Lack of documentation is the rule rather than the exception, and there are several cases of oral tradition only. A few of these cases seem to appear after the turn of the twentieth century, and may be at the instigation of lawyers in Mississippi, who were attempting to register Choctaw descendants of Mississippi.

Pushmataha had two wives. One, or both, went with him during the Creek War, and the War of 1812. We know for sure the name of one of his wives, but not the other. Nor do we know the children this mystery wife had. None of the works written about him state he had more than one residence, unlike Moshulatubbee, which suggests that his wives were relatives, or that they weren?t concurrent. I am including here the rumored wife and children, with comments on the validity, or problems with the claims made.

Immayahoka, also seen as Jamesaichiko, or Lunnabaka , (according to an excerpt from a work by Halbert I have not been able to verify with an original), was the daughter of Shumaka, also seen as Shemaka or Shomaka, of the Chakichiuma/Choccohoma tribe.

Shumaka is known to be the mother of Chief Robert Cole, and from his testimony of 1838 we know of many of his relatives. He fails to mention Immayahoka, or her children, however, in reading the testimony it is evident he is speaking of a meeting attended in his district in which Ward failed to enumerate claimants under article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, and the relatives he names are in that area. While it was unusual for women to leave their home after marriage, Patricia Galloway in her book states that changes in basket weaving patterns suggest it did occur. Thus, in the context of his testimony, his omission of Immayahoka cannot exclude her as being his relative at this point, though it is not confirmed.

Pushmataha and Immayahoka had three children alive at the time the family's allotment was sold. Of the children, I have only been able to trace the son. Charles Lanman?s story on Pushmataha states he had 5 children (published 1875). An act for the relief of James Madison, son of Pushmataha in 1818 gives us the name of one more child. It is said that he had one son who died prior to 1830, and perhaps this is the same son. The name of Pushmataha?s other child or wife is not known, nor can any other information be traced at this time.

The children of Pushmataha and Immayahoka are Betsy Moore, Martha Moore, and Hashchuhurtubbee, who took the name of Johnson Pushmataha, and moved to the new nation. All of the children were born before 1815, the girls were likely older than Johnson, and it is unknown if the name of Moore was assumed, or if they had married.

Johnson Pushmataha is found as a head of household on the annuity roll done in 1856 with the following household in Blue County. In a census of 1861 of male heads of households, Johnson?s age is given as over 45, which puts him born before 1815. Since he had a guardian in 1834, I assume he was under the age of 21, so he was likely born 1814-1815 at the close of the War of 1812. It appears he died between 1861 and 1868. It is not known if the children in his household were his or step children, nor have I been able to trace them at this time.

1855 Blue
156Johnson Push
Anna
Durant
Josephus
Finnus
Rhoda

Anna and Johnson Push divorced 1858, in Blue County.

It is possible that Hachetubi, on page 57 of Vol. 7 of the American State Papers is Johnson Pushmataha. The household lived on Pantha Creek, under Capt. Pierre Juzan, and had a household of 7, one male over 16, and 3 children under 10. (This would leave room for Immayoka, and his sister?s.)

Siblings of Pushmataha

Although I had previously published it differently, I have reconsidered given new evidence and changed some of my information on the sibling?s of Pushmataha. I now consider the possibility of more than one sibling of Pushmataha likely, because in 1813 he wrote a letter to the United States regarding the murder of 4 men and a woman in the Creek nation, two of which were his nephews. He further states that two of his relations were hunting the murderer?s and he hoped they would be sent home unharmed. Ironically, Mc Kee, Indian Agent of the Choctaws, didn?t address the matter until 1816, and considering the desire to have the Choctaws not join with the Creek?s in the war that was occurring, the failure to act on these murder?s shows a lack of judgment on the part of the government official who received it. It is to his credit that Pushmataha continued to aid the United States in their war with the Creeks, and in the War of 1812, when they appeared disinterested in the murder of his family members. Given that it is generally accepted that Nitakechi is also a relative of Pushmataha, and the number of relatives we now know, it does seem unlikely, although not impossible, that they all came from one sister. I am no longer believe Nitakechi is necessarily a relative of Pushmataha, despite the fact that Pierre Juzan was his second in command. If he is a relative, I believe he may come through a male relative.


Happy Bird and the Garlands
Sandra Riley a long time correspondent has indicated documents found at the National Archives links Happy Bird (Hushi Yukpa) as the sister of Pushmataha. This perhaps explains John Garland?s appointment as Chief during the civil disruptions just prior to the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek. As a nephew of Pushmataha, he could be seen as having an equal claim as Tappena Homma to the office. Since this period almost resulted in a Civil War within the Choctaw Nation, there are many competing claims to the office of District Chief in this time. Factions were holding councils and appointments weren?t always recognized by the United States government. Since Nitakechi was the Chief by 1830, and not John Garland, the exact political maneuvering of this time has not been satisfactorily explained. John Garland is assumed to be the son of James Garland and Happy Bird. His descendants reside in Towson in 1856 and many end up in San Bois by 1885. Since I am not sure that my information on these descendants is correct, I am not including them in this compilation.



Nahomtima or Natona

The sister of Pushmataha, named by Jack Amos, per Halbert, as Nahomtima, and from an excerpt from the court of claims by a Juzan descendant , as Natona, is not the same woman who was grandmother to the children of Louis Leflore. In fact it wasn?t until sometime after the 1930?s that that rumor even came into print. Asides from the obvious fact that Shumaka, as mother of Pushmataha?s wife, and great grandmother of the Leflore? s make the relationship impossible, the myth comes from oral history only, and has no substantiated evidence. The marriage of Peggy?s daughter to Benjamin Leflore would have had to occur within a separate Iska, and could not have occurred if she was the same woman as the daughter of Shumaka.

Another problem with the facts is the name, which has vastly different meanings when translated, and is represented in several variations on later censuses. In fact the name Nahotima is almost as common as Mary among the whites. The Juzan descendant?s testimony is full of errors, some of which appear to make it into Halbert?s research. I will discuss these problems with the appropriate children of Nahomtima.

It is unknown who exactly is the father of the children of Nahomtima, though it is possible that the father was Opaha, who per Halbert, served as a second in command for Pushmataha. Since two of her daughters had Christian names and were married to whites, they may be mixed bloods. Through Peggy and Delilah's father we know they were related to Robert M. Jones and James McDonald, but there is no indication that either Jones or McDonald claimed a relationship to the other children.

The known children of Nahomtima are
1.Margaret, also known as Peggy
2.Oka Lah Humma
3.Nah Ha Tima
4.Delilah
5.Tappena Humma

The suspected child of Nahomtima is
6.Cham ke or Shanke

This article, talks about Peggy and her "sisters" (or half sisters). Because we know the heirs of Mary Mcdonald, as claimed by Robert M. Jones, and can trace 3 of the 5, we know none of Nahomtima's descendants are listed among them.

Nahatoma's Children Discussed
Delilah

We know the least about Delilah. We know her five children?s names were Charity, Susan, Sarah, Betsy and Joseph, but no surname is given for these children on their land scrip. We know all five were alive in 1856, when Robert M. Jones wrote a letter about this land, and about 1860 at least one was still alive and living near Jackson, Mississippi, but we don?t know which one. Nor do we know if these children married. We also know that Delilah died shortly after the treaty and was living near Jackson, Mississippi. We also know that none of these children are named as heirs of Mary (Molly) McDonald by Jones, as are none of Peggy's children, thus strengthening the theory that Peggy and Delilah are related through their father and not their mother to Robert M. Jones and the others.



Oka Lah Homma
According to notes from Halbert, Oklahoma made a statement on October 3, 1844, shortly before his death, that he was approximately 60. He had two wives, the second being Anontoma (Anon Tooner on the deed in 1840). Jack Amos stated the names of his children as he remembered them were Tomaho (? unreadable), Tahenatubbee, General Dale, and two girls, Pisatima and Hotoma.

Per the court of claims his children were Winna (dead), Pissatemah (dead), Immanhola (dead), Himmonahtubbee (dead), Tahanahtubbee (male), and Cunnaomatubbee (male) over 10, and Sahhotona under 10. By this statement, Phoebe could not easily been one of the three children living, but could have died and been listed under her native name. Oklahoma was buried near Coosha town, in what is now Lauderdale County, MS. The town of Ofahoma is rumored to be named after Oklahoma. The Armstrong rolls showed his household as 13, one male over 16, and 5 children under 10. He is living in the same village as Pierre and Charles Juzan. Alongside him are Natona (his mother?), Shamke, and Tappenahoma.

From the court of claim testimonies, Oka Lah Homma had one son who came to Indian Territory. Only one claimant thus far has been found, (and is truly not a claimant even in Choctaw terms), and that is Sophina Carroll, the granddaughter of Jackson Nitakechi?s wife. She claims that her mother (would actually be grandmother), was a sister to Oka Lah Homma?s wife. At this time it is important to note, heirs of Peggy, Delilah and Tappena Homma had a legitimate claim. Given the prevalence of some of these heirs inside the Choctaw Nation (in Oklahoma), Sophina?s claim is far fetched at best. No heirs of Oka Lah Homma have been found alive in 1875.

Phoebe?s daughters with Charles Juzan, Ramona, Isabelle (Sybil) and Narcissa have never been successfully traced. Ramona had a son Jackson Wall (also went by Juzan), but he is dead by 1885 and no children are known to exist. Isabelle married Benjamin Walker, a brother to her sister?s husband George, but by 1839 she is once again going by Isabelle Juzan. It is not clear if she ever emigrated. Narcissa married William Thomas and is found in Lauderdale County, Mississippi with two children William and Elizabeth, but again, I have been unable to trace them further.


Na Hat Ima

Nahatima married Apatombbee, and at present only her son Jack Amos is accounted for. I suspect that Noahtima, who has four children under article 14, is the same as Nahatima. Because Mississippi Choctaws are so poorly documented after removal, and since nothing is mentioned by Jack Amos of other family members, we are unable to trace the rest of her family. Jack Amos served in the Civil War, and testified he had no children in his Dawes file. Jack Amos and others, sued, and won the right for Mississippi Choctaw?s to be recognized. The case, which was expected to make monetary gains, in fact did not, but it was largely the reason the Mississippi Choctaw Nation is present today. The number of full blood Choctaws who remained in Mississippi, and were never given an opportunity to register under Article 14 created a problem for the United States Government. Although the Court of Claims and multiple attempts to have these Choctaws emigrate were attempts to resolve the issue, the Dawes commission brought to light legitimate issues of those Choctaws who had remained in Mississippi. The actions of William Ward in refusing to register the Choctaws were once again coming back to bite the government. Unlike citizens of other Indian nations, in this case the government could not fail to recognize the legitimate claim of these descendants. Thus the Mississippi Choctaw nation was created, but limited to descendants at least of ½ or more Choctaw blood. Jack Amos was an informant and friend of Henry S. Halbert, and is mentioned frequently in his notes. It is from these notes that we have the name for Nahotima, and other facts about the family. According to Jack Amos, he was a toddler at the time of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek.


Tappena Homma

Tappena Homma is first found as the documented successor of Pushmataha six months after the death of Pushmataha. This leaves room for Oka Lah Homma to have been removed, but letters from David Folsom also suggest that Tappena Homma was removed from office, and the much documented removal of Oka Lah Homma for dissipation (alcohol), may in fact be truly attributed to Tappena Homma. Tappena Homma is often documented as also being General Humming Bird, this is an error. Obituaries for General Hummingbird have him dying at the age of 60 in 1829, having served with General Wayne in 1794. His burial was said to be next to the Agency. This makes General Humming Bird a contemporary of Pushmataha and Moshulatubbee, and his presence in treaty negotiations suggest he was a Mingo of a village within the same district. Tappena Homma is found on the Armstrong Rolls, although there are more than one with similar names, I believe he is listed on p. 57 as Tuppenahoma next to Oka Lah Homma with 10 in his family, 3 males over 16, and 6 children under 10.

Sandra Riley, a fellow researcher has found supporting documentation on our family, among them a letter to Washington in 1834 written by Pierre Juzan, on behalf of the estate of Tappenahoma. .

He says he is the agent for the family of Tappenahomah now deceased, and he is asking for a patent for the two sections of land located for Tappenahomah at the time of the treaty by Col. Martin. The following information in reference to letters found in DC archives confirms Tappenahoma is the nephew of Pushmataha...

General Hummingbird, who was likely the same age as Pushmataha or older, may be a relative of the family (see under Shanke/Chamke), but he is not the same person as Tappena Homma. Unfortunately the following documentation gives the following in error. (General Hummingbird died in 1828 and is buried near the Choctaw Trading house according to a newspaper article I have found).

From the Oklahoma Chronicles, Vol 17, No. 1, p 9, Hudson, Peter James
The United States government recognized General Humming Bird as his successor. He died on September 28, 1828, and is buried at Kusha Cemetery in Mississippi, where a sister of Pushmataha, Hotema, was buried. General Humming Bird with sixty Choctaw warriors joined General Anthony Wayne during the Indian War in Ohio. {Per Jack Amos, via Halbert's writings Tappenhoma is buried next to his mother Nahomtima}

There is a letter by David Folsom to Thomas McKinney about distributions. of $6,000 for something. He says he does not have faith in Chief Tapenahumma. I have not strong confidence in his doing it faithfully if it were placed entirely at has disposal"

Another letter by David Folsoms talks about the "unmoral conduct and intemperance of the Chief Tapennahomma of the South District has been broke of his office"

28 Sept 1828 to Sec of War
I am now in my friend Col. Wards House on my way to see the country pointed out to my nation by your friend Col. McKinney last year. I go to see the country because it is my great fathers request. I am chief of the Southern District of this nation in place of my uncle Pushmattahaw whose bones lyes below this earth near your residence. And which I trust his spirit is in a better world than this as you know as well as I that this is a place of continual trouble......."Taphemhoma

In the letter of Oct 11th Tappena Homma has been replaced by John Garland.

In another letter we find

5 July 1829
Uncle Tahpemaloomah has fully made up his mind to emigrate to the west of Mississippi (looks like 100 will accompany him) ? He would like to start by the 29 of October. I should like to go as an interpreter and I wish you to write to the Sec of war for the appointment for me.
Respectfully your friend
Pierre Juzan

From records of the Choctaw Academy, William K. Stewart is named as the son of Tappena Homma. Any other children are unknown at this time, and we cannot at this time trace William Stewart.


Cham Ke

We don't know for sure she's the daughter of Nahotima. She is most likely a female relative at the very least.

A Shanke/Chamke is listed on the Armstrong Rolls, with no children as is a Natona. Per Eliza Ann Flack's descendant's Peggy {Trahern} was the daughter of Shanke who was the daughter of Natona, Natona being the sister of Pushmataha. Another note states Pierre Juzan was married to Shanke. The math for Chamke being a child of Nahotima and the mother of Peggy is not feasible, but given that a maternal Aunt is considered a mother to the children, it is possible that she is in fact a child of Nahotima. Since the actual testimony about Eliza Ann Flack has not been found, the source of this information is still not known.

Sandra Riley sent the following information from the Court of Claims. This testimony was made by Tappena Homma, the son in law of Nitakechi. This interview said Shamke lived on Lost horse Creek across from Charles Juzan's place and moved to near General Humming Bird. Shamke had two sons, Kanchetubbi and Milohtubbi. Luke Foster and Sophine and Robinson Hall were children of the daughter of Kanchtubbi. This places Chamke in the same village as Nahotima.



Rumored Relatives of Pushmataha

The following relatives are rumored to be descendants of Pushmataha. Research would indicate that they aren?t relatives at all, but because of the prevalence of their publication, they are included here.

Running Deer, the Andersons and Pistikonay

Running Deer, possibly the daughter of Cham Ne (Chamnay) , was supposedly married to an Anderson which conflicting sources state is Joseph Anderson. Of this union she had a son John E. Anderson, also known as Jack. This is an unlikely rumor as Jack Anderson served in the War of 1812 and was born in South or North Carolina. It is known that a Daniel Anderson married within the Choctaw nation and had a son also named John who had many descendants in Oklahoma. According to the website, Daniel, Joseph, and John E. Anderson all appear at the same time in Mississippi Territory, suggesting they are related. It wasn?t uncommon for a white man to have families with both a white woman and a Choctaw one, sometimes at the same time, but given his age and place of birth, it is highly unlikely that Jack Anderson is a grandson of Pushmataha. I suspect this source came from a lawyer in Mississippi during the Dawes enrollment.

The other child of Pushmataha often seen documented online is Pis ti ko nay, the mother of five children by Simon Favre, a Frenchman who like his father, served as an Indian agent to the Choctaws. Just like the case of Running Deer, the ages for this family don?t seem to add up. Cham Ne is known to be the grandmother of Alex Favre, who first testified on her behalf in 1838, though a descendant only sites the 1844 claim. Alex Favre testified that Chamnay lived on Yazoo Creek near Okechawahbahford in Neetuckachees district (now Lauderdale County, Mississippi, where she had a house and improved
land. The record states that she died at this house in 1831 and was about 80 years old at the time of her death (born c 1751). Pis-tik-i-ok-o-nay, the daughter of Cham-nay and the mother of Alexis Favre, was also a full blood Choctaw and lived near to her mother on Boagfookah Creek (now Lauderdale County, Miss.). She "lived alone at the time of the Treaty in 1830 because her husband was dead." She also had a house and improved field in that year. In order to comply with the terms of the new Treaty, Pis- tik-i-ok-o-nay sent her representative to register her home place so that she could keep her land. When the representative attempted to register for her, he was refused by a Colonel Ward who was drunk. According to the Favre descendants, Pis ti ko nay also died in 1831. Alex also testified he was 60 in 1844, putting his birth year around 1784, though I suspect 1784-1787 would be more accurate. Alex?s first born child was baptized in 1805. This would put him at 18-21 years of age at her birth .

I suspect, that like most testimonies, Chamnay?s age is off by a few years, and she was probably slightly older than 80 at her death. I estimate her birth about 1747-1751. Given that time frame, Pistikonay had to have been born no later than 1770. Since Pushmataha was born in roughly 1764, the dates don?t match up. What I also know, is that John Jones Sr., second husband of my ancestor Caty testified in 1839 on the behalf of the children of Simon Favre. It is also very important to note, no testimony naming Pushmataha was found from this time frame in connection with this family.

It is a copy of a copy and hard to read, it comes from Sumter County, Alabama deed book 3, page 223. John Jones affidavit received and recorded April 2nd 1839. The State of Alabama, Sumter County. Before me John A. Cowan as acting justice of the peace for said county ? affidavit John Jones who being duly sworn according to law deposes ? and sayeth that he was acquainted with Simon Faver in his lifetime that said Simon Favre ? forty and fifty years ago married an indian woman named M? daughter of France Mastubbee as I understood from communications and by his had Simon's children said Favre married in the Choctaw tribe of Indians and resided on the Tombigby river. Deposee sayeth that he is satisfied and confident the above named ? unreadable were married although he was not there from the fact that he was invited to the marriage and from what ? who was there told him and also from the fact that he was not more than two miles and a ? from unreadable at the time of the wedding.

John Jones Sr. lived at Jones Bluff at the time (the wedding would have been 1789-1799), which is located in what is now Sumter Co. AL, and was not far from the Choctaw factory at St. Stephens, which in Simon?s time had been the Fort where he interpreted until it closed. Franchimastubbee came to power after the Choctaw Civil war, when he eventually became a Great Medal Chief, and was instrumental in many dealings with the Spanish. Given the nature of Simon?s position, and Franchimastubbee?s, a marriage between his family and Simon made sense. That isn?t to say Simon didn?t have children with another Choctaw, I just don?t see, based on the evidence that Pis ti ko nay was the daughter of Pushmataha, but instead, I believe she was the daughter of Chief Franchimastubbee. It is important to note that no Favre testimonies ever make a claim that they are related to Pushmataha, but rather only mention the female relatives.

The children of Simon Favre and Pis ti ko nay (Mary Ann in court documents) are Mary, Alex, Charles, Jean Baptiste, and Katherine. Descendants of Charles also made claims in 1904. The Favres moved from Mobile, and settled in Hancock County, Mississippi.

Unknown Sibling


A rumored brother of Pushmataha, who supposedly took the name Redman, has been documented as the father of Nitakechi, but no source for that assertion has been found. He is also supposed to be the father of George Washington Redman. Thus far all the information on George Redman (Redmond) shows he was in Alabama, served in the War of 1812 and was from the Carolina's. George W. Redmond is not likely a relative.


If Nitakechi is related to Pushmataha, it just may be through a male, as Sampson Loring in 1875 testified on behalf of Sophina Carroll as an heir to Oka Lah Humma , (Oklahomma). He neglected altogether to name any of Nitakechi?s relatives alive in 1875 as heirs, which makes me believe he did so because of the Choctaw tradition, (although it had changed), that hereditary took place through the women, and not the men. However it could also indicate that Nitakechi was not a relative at all. Sampson Loring also testified on behalf of several Blue county residents, including Semus Cole , who was a grandson of Nitakechi?s sister. It is evident from Sampson?s various testimonies, (primarily the descendants of Captain?s) that even among the full bloods the practice of intermarriage between the elite Choctaw families continued not only within the old nation but in the new. Additionally, Foreman names Opiahomma as brother to Nitakechi, but a source for this has not been found.

The following are the children of a presumed sibling.
1.Opia Humma, per Grant Foreman
2.Nitakechi
3.Daughter, grandmother of Semus Cole
4.Molly Nail, Nitakechi wrote that her daughter was his niece

Court of claim testimonies show the sons and grandchildren of Nitakechi?s sister living along side his own family. Most historians believe Nitakechi was a nephew of the Chief, and certainly the fact that Pierre Juzan acted in the same capacity as he did with his Uncle Tappenahoma suggests there was some sort of relationship, however, it is not known whether or not Nitakechi is in fact a relative.


Nitakechi
Nitakechi was also known as Fair Day. He served in the Creek War. He is named as the Chief of Black Water in Choctaw Academy records in 1826. Nitakechi was Chief of the district after Tappena Homma. He emigrated with his people, and either he or George Harkins was quoted in Little Rock, Arkansas as describing the emigration as a ?trail of tears and death.? This is the source for the name of Trail of Tears in describing the emigration of the Indians to Oklahoma.

The Armstrong rolls shows his household consisted of 19 individuals, one white, 5 males over 16, (including himself), and six children under 10 .Allowed 2360 acres, s16 and 21, t 16, r1W given.

Cushman gives two other children, Jackson Nitakechi, and a daughter married to Red Gum (not surprisingly, like most of Cushman?s translation?s this is incorrect, the translation is Red War Club, by his own testimony.) Cushman states that these men died shortly after his death; however, they were alive 20 years after Nitakechi died. Additionally, Jackson and Henry Graves are named in Court of Claims as Nitakechi?s only heirs. The omission of Tappenyahomma?s children is bothersome, but this would not be the only case in which omission of heirs is found. The treaty of Dancing Rabbit creek names Henry Groves (not Graves), Cushman states he changed his name to Henry Byington and worked with the missionaries in Armstrong Academy.

Emigration records show
Nittacachee Chief, 40
Conneahoka 37 F
Pistonahoyo 20 F
Peyton Graves 10 M
Silas Brown 12 M
William Graves 8 M
John Graves 5
Oustepehona 7 F
Hayo 3 F
Tikbitubbee 18 M
Tanubbee 16 M
Shopokehaya 24 M
Elapeona 22 F
Mihatombee 3M
Noksintubbee 23 M
Alooma 20 F

Henry Greaves {Graves} age 10-24 listed alone.

The 1855 census shows Tunnapahomma {Red Gum} and Jackson Nitakechi. I have been able to trace some of Tappenya Homma?s descendants who take the name Homma and Jones, but have been unable to trace Jackson Nitakechi at this time. It is not clear if the mother of Tappenya Homma?s children was Nitakechi?s daughter or another woman. Along with Sampson Loring, Tappenya Homma is a source of many testimonies for Blue County in the Court of Claims in 1875. We can trace descendants of Henry Graves, and I am in contact with one of them.




Allied Families of the Choctaw Nation, MS and OK
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Mushulatubbee and his siblings
Genealogy is listed here

Moshulatubbee was the last of the three great Chiefs, often referred to as the last of the hereditary chiefs. His father was Homomastubbee, also seen as Moshulatubbee I. He had two wives and two homes. He succeeded his father as chief of his district by 1815. When he spent his portion of the annuity and filled the Choctaw Academy with relatives in 1825, the rest of the Chiefs were angered. Unlike Apuckshunnubbee and Pushmataha, his relatives are much clearer. In letters he refers to Peter P. Pitchlynn as his nephew (actually great nephew). Missionary records name John Everson, John Riddle, and William Riddle as nephews, and his four eldest sons. One of his wives was a full blooded Choctaw, the other was mixed. His children are seen with the surname of King, perhaps in reference to the missionary teacher?s letters in which he calls Moshulatubbee the King.

The school in his district was largely composed of his relatives. His nephew Joseph Kincaid acted as a second in command, and eventually was Chief of the district. Moshulatubbee opposed David Folsom and Greenwood Leflore and was involved in a well documented incident in which the nation was at the brink of war, shortly before the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek. He had a brother, Atobah, who was cleared of the accidental death of a white man. Unable to deal with the guilt and in his eyes from a cultural standpoint, deserving of death, he committed suicide a few months after the acquittal. It is not clear if he is the father of John Everson however. The McCann?s who also attended the school, are likely connected somehow as well, and are neighbors and relatives in later years.

Moshulatubbee proven children are Susan King Cooper, McKee King, James Madison King, Peter King, Charles King, Tecumseh King, and Hiram King. Two others, Susan King and Rufus King are also likely children.


Nakita

Nakita, a sister of Moshulatubbee, was the mother of Sophia Folsom. It is not clear if Nakita is actually her name. This comes from William Pitchlynn Polland, but is not proven. From letters within the Peter Pitchlynn collection, it appears that she is also the mother of Joseph and Andrew Kincade, and presumably James Kincade who is also shown as emigrating. Dawes testimonies also indicate she had at least one other daughter, but it is not known if this daughter is a Folsom, Kincade or even a full blood. This daughter lived in the new Choctaw nation, and likely had a family, but is never named. Chilletah and Hontubbee are also relatives of unknown origins based on Peter?s correspondence and Dawes testimonies. Although Joseph had a family in 1830, virtually all of the known Kincade descendants are from Andrew Kincade, with only two men unaccounted for. They can either be sons or grandchildren of Joseph or James Kincade. Besides being our distant cousins, the Kincade family ends up in connection with the Traherns, Juzans, and Jones families, all of whom are connected to our family research.
This family can be found here (Pitchlynn)

Caty and the Riddle Family
Genealogy is here

William Riddle appears first in records on a census of the Spanish Territory in 1781 in the Mobile area. He appears next in records of the Choctaw Trading house as an I.C. or Indian countryman until his estate is mentioned in 1818. His Choctaw wife was Caty, a sister to the Choctaw Chief Moshulatubbee. Where William Riddle emigrated from is not known, but he may be related to the Riddle?s in the Virginia and North Carolina area (Lunenburg County area), some of whom had known Tory sympathies. Caty was from the Okla Apa Opet District of the Choctaw nation, and resided in what is now Sumter County, Alabama.

William and Caty had the following children, Mary, born before 1793, Susan born in or about 1793, Lucinda, date of birth unknown, born after 1793, Joseph, likely born around 1800-1804, John W., born 1/1/1809, and William, born in 1811. After William?s death, Caty married John Jones, Sr. He apparently was close to the two younger boys, as he gave them property in what is now Sumter Co., Alabama, but neglected to give Joseph any property. The Armstrong Rolls shows Caty?s second husband?s residence 5 miles from the factory, near Demopolis. It also indicates that Susan lived on the Tombigbee, 7 miles from Demopolis, Joseph lived on the Tombigbee, Mary (or her husband), lived on the Tombigbee, on land belonging to Thomas Lewis.

From a testimony made by Tandy Walker in 1875, we have the following information about the heirs of William Riddle, (erroneously referred to as John Riddle).

The Choctaw Nation
To Tandy Walker, heir and legal representative of Mary Walker born Riddle, dec'd- {and} Mary Blackburn {born Walker}
Heirs of Susan Hall, born Riddle, viz. Catherine Wall, Margerite Moncrief, and heirs of Sarah Trahan {Trahern}, viz: Roberty, Lysander, James, Joseph, William, Lavinia and Catherine-
Heirs of Jincey Folsom- (not listed, while she had 6 children I only know of 2 with heirs)
Heirs of Joseph Riddle, viz, Moses Riddle, Jesse Riddle and Betsy Wall.
Heirs of John Riddle Jr. viz George, William, Douglass, Martha Edmonds, Sarah Cooper and heirs of Margerite Johnson- grandchildren and heirs of John Riddle Jr.

? 50 head of Stock Horses abandoned in old Choctaw Nation in Sumpter County Alabama on Bodka {sp?] creek at $20.00 each 1000.00
$1000.00

Skullyville, C. N.
July 21st A.D. 1875 On this day personally appears before me, William B. Pitchlynn , one of the Commisioners of the Court of Claims for Mosholatubbe District of the Choctaw Nation, under and by the virtue of an act of the General Council of the Choctaw Nation passed Nov. 6th, A.D. 1872, creating a court of claims. {?unreadalbe abbreviation} Tandy Walker who being duly sworn deposes and says that he verily believes that he, for himself, and others above and hereafter to be mentioned have a just and equitable claim on the Choctaw Nation for the value of fifty horses abandoned at the time of emigration in the old Choctaw Nation in Sumpter County, State of Alabama. That he claims as one of the heirs of John (should be William) Riddle, Snr- his grandfather who was a Choctaw by marriage (birth lined through) and resided in the said county and state of Bodka Creek that it (next large portion of sentence unreadable on copy) of a large stock of horses that these horses continued in possession of his heirs until the emigration of said heirs from that country to the Choctaw Nation, West. That the number of horses owned by said John Riddle at or about the time of his death, previous to the treaty of 1830 was estimated to be on or about three hundred that by depredation this stock had been reduced to on (lined through) or about fifty head which number deponent verily believes were left and abandoned that the said horses were worth at lest one thousand dollars being an average price of twenty dollars each that de does not believe that any ( and again, large portion of the copy is dark and unreadable, about 3-4 lines), that his grandfather John Riddle Snr, (not readable next few words, think it says left the following heirs or children, but the copy is too black to read) viz: Joseph, John, and William, Mary, Susan, and Lucinda. Lucinda died leaving no heirs. Mary died leaving claimant and deponent and Mary Blackburn, born Walker. Susan died leaving heirs Catherine Wall, Margerite Moncrief, and Sarah Trahan dec'd and Jinsey Folsom dec'd. Joseph Riddle died and left heirs Moses Riddle, Jesse Riddle and Betty Wall. John Riddle Jr. died and left heirs George William and Douglas and Martha Edmonds, Sarah Cooper and Margaret Johnson dec'd. Signed by Tandy Walker.
Below that is Sworn and subscribed to before me, this 21st day of July A.D. 1875 signed William B. Pitchlynn, one of the commissioners of the Court of Claims for Mosholatubbe District of the C.N.
Another testimony follows, for the same date, can not read most of the first part of this copy, but I can pick out a few words, nothing understandable, nor is the testimony portion that is signed legible. (cut off) the part that is readable is the last few lines, He thinks there could not have been less than three hundred altogether (horses) John Riddle died before the treaty thinks there were about three hundred head left at the time of the treaty {unreadable word} and two others went at one time to {?} horses their provisions gave out were forced to return these horses had a very wide range don't recollect that John Riddle's heirs ever sold or otherwise disposed of the horses never heard of them having done so they never brought any of these horses to this county.

After the death of William Riddle, Caty married John Jones Senior. John and his brother Samuel lived on or near Jones Bluff, in Sumter County, Alabama. John had children by a prior marriage, but only the names of a daughter and grandchildren are found in the Court of Claims. However, Robert M. Jones wrote in 1830 about the recent death of old Uncle Jones. The Armstrong Rolls indicate that Samuel Jones Sr. died the same year. This would seem to indicate that Robert M. Jones was at least a grandson of John Jones, or another Jones sibling whose name is not known. Researchers have the father of Robert McDonald Jones as Samuel Wilson Jones, but I have not confirmed this. All of the Jones? appear to be related, but at this point, no one has successfully figured out the parentage early on. Mention of papers for property in Virginia, found in Robert M. Jones? estate may actually give some clues as to the origin of the Jones brothers. John Jones gave property to Caty and her sons in Sumter County, and testified in 1838 for Simon Favre?s heirs. Caty may have immigrated after his death to the new nation.


Mary Riddle
The Walker Family

Mary Riddle was married to John Walker. Although we have a list of children of John Walker, Tandy Walker omits the legitimate heirs of his brother?s and sister in his court of claim testimony, for this reason, I suspect John Walker may have had plural wives. According to his testimony, only he and his sister, Mary Blackburn, were the living heirs of Mary Riddle. John Walker comes from the Walker?s of Lunenburg County, VA, and his brother, Tandy Walker was a blacksmith in the Creek nation. This Tandy Walker was famous for his rescue of a white woman during the Creek War. He ended up in Texas. John Walker and Tandy Walker arrived and had land by 1805, found in the American State Papers as a joint claim. Based on the ages of Mary?s Children, John married Mary Riddle around 1805, but to have a valid land claim, he would have been present at least by 1797. A descendant of the Hall?s, who began genealogy in the early 20th century believed that the Riddle?s and the Walker?s emigrated together. Since William Riddle was present in 1781, this is unlikely, but there are definitely Riddle?s present and living in Lunenburg County during the American Revolution, and serving along side the Walkers in the War and against them as Tory sympathizers. Judith Walker, the wife of Robert M. Jones, who died young and without children was also likely a child of Mary Riddle. John?s other children, Louis, John and Permelia are not included in the descendants of Mary Riddle at this time.



Lucinda Riddle

Lucinda?s marriage is found in Marengo County, Alabama on February 4, 1826. Her husband in this marriage is Isaac Garner, but Tandy Walker claims the marriage was to Isaac Garvin. In old cursive, the names would be almost identical, and there are both Garvin?s and Gardner?s (often seen as Garner) in the Choctaw nation. If she had children, none were alive by 1875, and she had no heirs. Whether or not she emigrated, and when she died is not known. 
Unknown, Chief or Choctaw Pushmataha (I272008484161)
 
105

From http://www.shelbycountyindiana.org:

Eminent as a lawyer and jurist, and holding worthy prestige as a citizen, Hon. Kendall Moss Hord stands out clear and distinct in the history of Shelby county and few men of his calling in the state can boast of as long and distinguished a career of professional service. Achieving success in the courts at a period when most young men are entering upon the formative period of their lives, wearing the judicial ermine with becoming dignity and bringing to every case submitted to him clearness of perception and ready power of analysis characteristic of the master of jurisprudence, his name and deeds for nearly half a century have been closely allied with the legal institutions, public movements and political interests of the state, in such a way as to gain for him honorable recognition among the notable men of his day and generation.
Judge Hord is a lineal descendant of Thomas Hord, who was born in Essex county, Virginia, where, according to the records of said county, he purchased in November, 1736, a large tract of land. Little is known of this ancestor beyond the fact of his having become a man of influence in the above county, and taken an active interest in the settlement of the country and the development of its resources. He died in Virginia in 1766, and left several children who subsequently migrated to other parts, their descendants in due time locating in various central and western states.
Hon. Francis T. Hord, the subject's father, was born in the old Dominion state, but left there many years ago, moving with his family to Mason county, Kentucky, where he received his education and grew to maturity. In early life he studied law and after his admission to the bar rose rapidly in his profession and within a comparatively brief period became one of the leaders of his profession in Mason county. When the county seat was moved from Washington to Marysville, he changed his residence to the latter place where he continued to practice his profession during the remainder of a long and eventful life, achieving distinguished success the meanwhile and attaining an influential position among the lawyers of the state, long noted for the high order of its legal talent. In addition to the general practice he served with signal ability on the bench of the circuit, and was also an influential factor in state politics for many years, and at one time represented his senatorial district in the Legislature.
Elizabeth Moss, who became the wife of Francis T. Hord, was also a native of Virginia, and a woman of strong character and many sterling attributes. The children of this estimable couple, seven sons and two daughters were as follows: Oscar B., a prominent member of the Indiana Bar, and for years associated with Hon. Thomas A. Hendricks; William T., a surgeon in the United States Navy; George M., a commission merchant, of Chicago; Francis T., a lawyer of Columbus, Indiana, and long the leader of the bar of that city; Elias R., a resident of Chicago, where he carries on a large commission business; Kendall M., of this review; Harry C., a physician and surgeon, who died in early manhood; Mary G. married John R. Clark, and lives in Maysville, Kentucky, being at this time in her eighty-third year; Josephine, also a resident of Maysville, is the wife of James B. Noyes.
Judge Hord was born in Maysville, Kentucky, October 20, 1840, and spent his early life in his native town. After a preliminary mental training in the elementary schools, he entered Maysville Seminary, from which he was graduated in due time, this being the same institution of learing[sic] in which President U. S. Grant finished his education. For some time following his graduation Mr. Hord taught school and while thus engaged read law under the direction of his father, making substantial progress in his studies and laying broad and deep the foundation for his future usefulness. In the spring of 1862 after a satisfactory examination before two Judges, he was admitted to the bar and at once began the practice of his profession at Flemingsburg, Kentucky, but the Civil war being in progress, and not caring to take part in the conflict, he finally decided to look elsewhere for a more favorable opening. Accordingly he disposed of his business at Flemingsburg and coming to Indianapolis entered the office of Hendricks & Hord, with the object in view of familiarizing himself with Indiana practice. After one year in the capital city he located at Shelbyville, where his ability soon won recognition among the rising young attorneys of the local bar.
The year following his removal to this city, Judge Hord was elected Prosecuting Attorney of the Common Pleas Court, and after serving two years in that capacity was further honored by being elected Prosecuting Attorney of the Sixteenth Judicial Circuit, which position he held for the same length of time. In 1872 he was again elected to the same position and after discharging the duties of the same with credit to himself and to the satisfaction of the public for a period of four years, was called to the higher and more responsible position of Judge of the Sixteenth Judicial Circuit, comprising the counties of Shelby and Johnson. Judge Hord brought to the bench a mind well disciplined by intellectual and professional training, his previous experience in all phases of the law, peculiarly fitting him for the exacting duties of the position. Such were the wisdom and clearness of his decisions that but few of them were set aside by the Supreme Court. After occupying the bench two terms, twelve years, Judge Hord resumed the active practice of law as senior member of the firm of Hord & Adams, ad has so continued ever since, being in point of continuous service the oldest member of the Shelbyville bar, and one of the most eminent men of his profession in the central part of the state. His first partner was John L. Montgomery, after whose death in 1870, he practiced with Alonzo Blair for six years, and in 1888 became associated with E. K. Adams, his present partner.
As a lawyer Judge Hord exhibits a keenness of perception, a firmness of grasp upon legal propositions and a power analysis possessed by few. From the time of engaging in the practice at Shelbyville in November, 1862, he has maintained his office at the northeast corner of the public square and for nearly a half century has prosecuted his profession with energy and success.
Judge Hord was married August 20, 1867, to Emily McFarland, who was born in Springfield, Ohio, on the 26th of May, 1847, being a daughter of John B. and Betsy McFarland, the father for many years a business man of Shelbyville. Judge and Mrs. Hord have one son, Luther J., born May 10, 1869. He was educated in the Indiana University, and at Purdue, graduating from the departments of pharmacy and chemistry, and for some years conducted a very successful drug business in Oklahoma. Disposing of his interest in the West he returned to his native city, where he is now manager of the Hord Sanitorium, his father being a partner in the enterprise.
Judge Hord is a representative Democrat of the Jeffersonian school, and enjoys the distinction of having never been defeated for any office to which he aspired. His oratorical abilities are in great demand during the progress of campaigns, and he is popular as a speaker at banquets, decoration days and other public functions. He is a member of the Free and Accepted Masons, Knights of Pythias and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, to which he has belonged for many years; also the Improved Order of Red Men, in which he has served as great sachem of the state, besides representing the order in the Great Council of the United States. The Judge has been successful financially as well as professionally and during his long and active practice has placed himself in independent circumstances; his residence at No. 85 West Washington street is one of the finest and most attractive in the city.
History of Shelby County Indiana, by Edward H. Chadwick, B.A. Assisted by well known local talent. Illustrated
Contributed by Melinda Moore Weaver
Picture from Boetcker's Picturesque Shelbyville


~ ~ ~ ~ ~
Hon. Kendall Moss Hord. ? That every man will follow his own inclinations the best and do it so easily that he hardly seems to put forth an effort, is proof that great excellence and superiority usually are the results of natural endowments, which will always excel mere education and culture. The present Circuit Judge of Shelby County, to those who know him, demonstrates the truth of this assertion. In him the voice of nature .comes ringing down through the past, lavishing upon him many of her choicest gifts, and marking him with the brio-ht star of genius. The family originally came from Sweden, settling in Virginia at an early day, where Elias Hord, the grandfather of Kendall M., was born, grew up and married, afterward moving to Mason County, Ky., where he spent the latter part of his life. The father of Kendall M., viz.: Francis T. Hord, was born in Mason County, Ky., where he grew to manhood and married Elizabeth S. Moss, a native of the " Old Dominion," who had come to Kentucky with her parents in early girlhood; nine children were born of that marriage, Kendall M. being the seventh in the family, and the sixth son. He was born in Maysville, Ky., Oct. 20, 1840, and his youth was passed in his native county. His father entered the law profession in Washington, Mason County, but upon the removal of the county seat to Maysville, he located in that city, where he continued practice until his death. He was a lawyer of extraordinary natural ability, and one of the leaders of the Kentucky bar. His sons have inherited his talents and love for the legal profession, three of whom are leading lawyers of Indiana, and the balance have become prominent in their respective callings. The subject of this sketch, in early youth, exhibited more than ordinary ability, and when but nineteen years of age, graduated from the Maysville Seminary. In 1859, he began the study of law in his father's office, teaching school in the winter season, but still continuing his legal studies. In the spring of 1862, he underwent an examination before two Judges of the Circuit Court of Kentucky, and was admitted to the bar. He immediately located in practice at Flemingsburg, Ky., where he remained until the fall of 1863, when he came to Indianapolis, and entered the office of Hendricks & Hord, for the purpose of becoming familiar with the code practice in Indiana, but more especially to await an opportunity of selecting a town in which to locate. In the early winter of 1863, he located at Shelbyville, and the following year was elected District Prosecutor of the Common Pleas Court, holding the position two years. In 1866, he was elected on the Democratic ticket Prosecuting Attorney of the Circuit Court, which he held two years, during which time he began to be recognized as one of the leading lawyers of the Shelby County bar. He was married August 20, 1S67, to Miss Emily McFarland, to whom has been born one son: Luther J. Mrs. Hord was born in Springfield, Ohio, and is the daughter of John and Betsey McFarland, who settled in Shelbyville about 1855, where they resided until death. In 1872, Mr. Hord was again elected as Prosecuting Attorney of the Circuit Court, and in 1876, he was elected Judge of the Circuit Court, which position he now occupies. In his practice as a lawyer, and in his experience as a judge, he has exhibited a keenness of perception, a firmness of grasp upon legal propositions, and a power of analysis which are given only to the natural jurist. As a practitioner, his abundant theoretical resources never failed to advance the interests of his client; and in his discussions of law to the court, or of fact to the jury, he was ever practical, logical and lucid; and with his personal magnetism, fluency, scope of language and perfect voice, he secured the attention of his auditor and always made deep impressions. He combines within himself rare qualities of mental and physical strength, an indefatigable will, keen judgment and quick observation.
History of Shelby County, Indiana, Brant & Fuller, 1887, "Shelbyville Sketches," page 496-97.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming 
Hord, Judge Kendal Moss (I272008483468)
 
106

From jsalus2@verizon.net 10/2012

The October 9, 1839, edition of the Daily National Intelligencer, Washington, DC, published this obituary for Samuel Abernathy. No date of death is given.

Another Revolutionary Soldier Gone.
Died, at his residence near Springfield, Hampshire County, Virginia [today West Virginia], Captain Samuel Abernathy, in about the 94th year of his age. The deceased was a native of Pennsylvania and a soldier of the Revolution. In company with his brother, the late William Abernathy, he went to that place, then a wilderness, soon after the close of the Revolutionary War, where he has resided ever since.  
Abernathy, Captain Samuel (I1808647901)
 
107

From Seattle Post Intelligencer January 13, 1929 page 7C:

SNOW-At 424 North 25th , Anna R Snow, aged 76 years old, beloved mother of Willima Shufelt and Mrs. Nellie Little of Seattle, Louis Niles of Centralia. Funeral services Rafferty funeral parlors Tuesday, January 15, 2 p.m. Internment Crown Hill.

(Gravesite is located in South East Row 49/30 #14.)
 
Niles, Anna R (I619150987)
 
108

From secky8 The All Connected Family Tree in Ancestry

Thomas REID (Eliza REED , Rose GAINES , ) was born about 1830 in Washington County, AL. He died about 1900. He was buried in Old Sawyer Cemetery, Charity Chapel. Charlie Reid?s notes (see above) state that Thomas Reid moved to the area around Lucedale, MS, and little more information was provided. He appears in the 1880 Mobile County Census residing near Seaborn Reid in a precinct near Citronelle, AL: Thomas Reid, race Mulatto, age 50, and a worker in the turpentine industry is shown on the census with wife Sarah, age 48. Names of children in the household are: Ferely ("Pearlie"?), daughter, age 27; Nancy, daughter, age 25; Olivor (Oliver?), son, age 22; David, son, age 20; Louisa, daughter, age 17; Eliza, daughter, age 15; Theodore, son, age 12; and Georgia, daughter, aged 10. Pedigree files at the Latter Day Saints Internet site have been seen that list some of these children as those of William Oliver Morris (I), who was married to Sarah prior to her marriage to Thomas, but there is no consistency in the children attributed to either father. For example, the four children listed in the Latter Day Saints (LDS) Family Pedigree File for William Oliver Morris are Nancy, Oliver, David and Louisa, omitting the oldest girl, Ferely (Pearlie), when logic says that this child was most likely born of the marriage between William Oliver and Sarah. The child Oliver is most likely William Oliver Morris (II), who would marry Florazel Reid, Seaborn?s daughter.Thomas was reported to be buried in the Old Sawyer Cemetery at Charity Chapel, AL, by an Internet site no longer in existence, but inspection of that cemetery revealed no headstone for any member of Thomas Reid's family. It is noted that all the other Reids who returned or whose bodies were returned to Charity Chapel are buried in the Charity Chapel Cemetery, which is about a mile up the road in back of the church.Thomas married Sarah OVERSTREET. Sarah was born about 1834 in Unk. Discussions between the author of this file and another researcher have raised the probability that the Sarah Overstreet identified here was first married to William Oliver Morris and that their children included the William Oliver Morris who would marry Seaborn Reid's daughter Florazel. This possibility is made all the more probable because the names of children within this family listed by various researchers differs from source to source, indicating that some of the children were William Oliver Morris'. This is an unresolved issue. See notes for spouse Thomas Reid for further information.Thomas and Sarah had the following children: 19 FiLouisa REID was born about 1863 in Alabama. Louisa is shown as a child of a prior marriage between mother Sarah and William Oliver Morris(I) at one LDS site, however, another site attributes Louisa to the second marriage between Thomas Reid and Sarah. Neither site attributes "Ferely" (Pearlie?), oldest "daughter" shown in Thomas and Sarah's household on the 1880 census, to either marriage but both completely omit her, and it is highly probable that she was the child of William Oliver. This is an issue that has not been resolved. 20 FiiEliza REID was born about 1865 in Alabama. 21 MiiiTheodore REID was born about 1868 in Alabama. 22 FivGeorgia REID was born about 1870 in Alabama.
 
Reed, Thomas (I271987797519)
 
109

From secky8, The All Connected Family Tree in Ancestry;

Rose continued to live on with her descendents at Tibbee after Daniel's death until her own death.Daniel and Rose had the following children: Julia (Juda) REED was born about 1811 in Washington County, AL. She married John HARRIS.Eliza REED was born about 1812 in Washington County, AL. It is Eliza?s descendents only who will be dealt with in this family history.George REED was born on 16 Feb 1815 in Washington County AL.George is shown on the 1860 Census as 48 years old, marking his birth year as 1812; he is shown as 64 on 1880 census, which would mark his birth date as 1816. George appears as a Reed on the 1860 census, as a Reid on the 1880 census. He founded the village of Reed?s Chapel, according to Matte, in 1829. That is where the center of MOWA Choctaw life is located. He is said to have fathered 11 children by his two wives, but because they, as well as the other families who remained in Alabama for the most part, are documented elsewhere and do not have a continuing relationship with that branch of the family which descended from Seaborn and Georgeanne Logan Reid and settled predominantly in south Mississippi, are not further dealt with here. George married (1) Maria COLBERT daughter of Gen William COLBERT and Jessie MONIAC. George married (2) Ellen (Fotenay) WEAVER daughter of Dave WEAVER and Cecile WEATHERFORD. Ellen was born in 1835. Matilda REED was born about 1817 in Washington County AL. Matilda married Needham BRYANT. Needham was born about 1810.William REED was born on 6 Mar 1821 in Washington County AL. He died on 11 Dec 1894 in Washington County, AL. William married Lorenda WEAVER. Lorenda was born on 24 Jun 1833 in Washington County, AL. She died on 12 Jul 1913 in Washington County, AL. Lucretia REED was born unknown in Alabama. She did not marry. Her death date is unknown.Reuben REED was born in Feb 1824 in Washington County AL. He died in 1903 in Reed?s Chapel, Washington County, AL. Reuben married Emaline WEAVER. Emaline was born in 1843 in Mobile County, AL.Emaline REED was born 10 Feb 1824 in Washington County, AL. Emaline married Willis DAUGHTERTY. Willis was born 5 Dec 1828 in Alabama. All these people would live out their lives and raise families in Washington and Mobile Counties. Their descendents are largely represented among the members of the MOWA band still residing in that area. The remainder of this family history will not be devoted to them, but to the REID descendents of Eliza REED, and in particular the family of her son, Seaborn REID. 
Gaines, Rose (I271987797480)
 
110

From secky8, The All Connected Family Tree in Ancestry;

A response to the above message that I forwarded to him, Professor Carl Brasseaux, historian and author at USL in Lafayette, wrote:

This is a tri-racial group that received its name--CAJAN, not CAJUN--when a post-Civil War gubernatorial candidate in Alabama labeled the group "Cajun" (which had come to mean "white trash" in Louisiana) as a means of insulting them. Unfortunately, the name stuck, leading to further confusion.CarlThe spelling is incidental. I see both "cajan" and "cajun" used interchangeably by the people themselves and by others who have studied them. Members of the various Alabama "cajun" community are very clear about the reason they refer to themselves as "cajun." In the late 1960's, one of them told G. H. Stopp, "We called ourselves Cajuns 'cause we didn't want to be called [infamous N-word]. Now if our children get educated and leave or marry whites and forget they're Cajun, that's good" (p. 54).The original lineage of the Alabama group descends from a free man of color named Daniel REED who may have been born in the BritishWest Indies. An Act of the Alabama Legislature in 1818 authorized him to emancipate his wife, Rose, and together they established a prosperous cattle and trading business near the old state capital of St. Stephens. Daniel REED died in 1844, after his children intermarried with several local white and mixed families, particularly the WEAVER lineage. As Professor Brasseaux said, local politicians after the Civil War had low regard for these backwoods people, and the term "cajan" (unintentionally mispelled(sic), I believe) was used to distinguish them from other settlers in the area.There were, in fact, several families in the area with Louisiana Creole, Cajun and French Canadian ties. One of the first settlers in the vicinity of the abandoned first Ft. Louis de la Mobile was a (self-described) Creole from the Baton Rouge area named CHASTA(E)NG, whose name was given to the location called "Chasta(e)ng's Bluff." French Canadians had been settling among local Indiancommunities in the same area since the days of the Bienville colony. And finally, a number of Acadian families settled along the Alabama and Mississippi coast after the Grand Derangement. The availability of legitimate "cajun" and "creole" labels was already well-established in the area before Reconstruction politicians misapplied it to these people.These are most of the surnames used by the Alabama "cajun" population in Washington County: BASS, BYRD, CARROLL, CHASTANG, COLE, DAVIS, EVANS, FARMER, HOPKINS, JORDAN, JOHNSTON, LAMBERT, LIPSCOMB, LOFTON, NEWBURN, ORSO, REED, RIVERS, SULLIVAN, SNOW, TAYLOR, TURNER, WEAVER, WIGGINS, WILKERSON.Here are some formal sources for those of you who may want more information:Green, Clatis. "Some Factors Influencing Cajun Education in Washington County, Alabama," Unpublished M.A. thesis, University of Alabama ,1941.Murphy, Laura Frances. "The Cajans of Mobile County, Alabama," Unpublished M.A. thesis, Scarritt College, Nashville, Tennessee, 1935.Murphy, Laura Frances. "Mobile County Cajans," Alabama Historical Quarterly, Spring, 1930, 76-86.G. H. Stopp, "The Impact of the 1964 Civil Rights Act on an Isolated 'Tri-Racial' Group," Unpublished M.A. thesis, University of Alabama, 1971."  
Reed, Daniel Bolar (I271987797479)
 
111

From secky8, The All Connected Family Tree in Ancestry;

Another theory on Daniel Reed's lineage was that offered by Doris Brown, the Washington County genealogist who has studied this family perhaps as extensively as anyone. Deriving her research from the records of passports issued by the Indian Agent Benjamin Hawkins in Georgia permitting holders? entry into Creek Nation territory, Doris concluded that Daniel's father was Hardy Reed, son of an Englishman and a Creek Woman. Daniel's mother was identified by Doris as Eliza Tarvin, a Creek woman. Hardy and Peter Reed, Hardy?s father, were Indian tradesmen, according to Doris. [Spanish archives identify a ?Hardy Read? residing in Tombecbe? in 1781; a ?Richard Tervin (Tarvin?) appears on a similar Mobile list for 1786.] Other members of this family included Daniel's brothers Amos and George. [An Amos Reed has been identified in various historical documents from the territorial period of present-day Washington County, AL.] Later, Amos would move to Miss. and George would be sent west as part of the Indian relocation, according to Doris Brown. The journals of the Creek Indian agent, Benjamin Hawkins, contains the following relevant entry for 1797:"The second man of the town and Owlelo Mico visited me, the former with a request that I would permit Hardy Reed to reside and trade in their nation; that he had been to Colerain and obtained goods to the amount of 4 or 5 hundred dollars, part on credit . . . that he had not obtained a license. I explained the law on this subject, and told them how Mr. Reed was to act. . . I directed Mr. Reed not to attempt to sell his goods in the town where he was as there were two traders long resident there, but to go to some place, where there was a vacancy, and there reside until he was informed where the agent of the War Department would reside and grant license, and then to conform himself in future to the law....""Mico" is the Creek term for Chief. The? second man of the town" is not further identified.Hardy Reed is mentioned again by Hawkins in 1799 as an illiterate Indian trader in the Creek district of Cowetta. Hawkins also spoke well of a "Jeptha Tarvin" in this same era, calling him an "honest man." According to notes listing the people mentioned in Hawkins' writing, Tarvin's Creek name was "Johnny Haujo." An 1815 list of claimants for injuries suffered by the victims of the Red Stick uprising includes Hardy Reed. Also, a "Mi hee Reed" and a "Richard Tarvin" are shown in adjacent households on a 1832 census of the Creek people. . [It is noted that "Hardy Reed," b. abt. 1762, married to "Tabitha Reed," appeared as head of household of eight ?other free" persons on the Gates County, North Carolina, 1790 census. A "Hardy Reed" (possibly the same one, on the move - he was no longer in Gates County in 1800) also appears as head of household of seven ?other free" and three slaves in the 1790 census for South Orangeburg District, SC. The 1790 census only classed non-slaves as ?free white? or ?other free;? in 1800 the census classifications were expanded to include ?other free except Indians not taxed.? The question really evolves to: Was this the same man who by 1781 shows up in Tombecbe (then under Spanish control) and then in 1797seeks a passport to go from Georgia into the Creek territory to trade with those people?]Discussion with Doris Brown indicated that there are no written records that she has found which would actually prove Daniel?s heritage. She mentioned many stories that have been passed on orally (e.g., that he may have fled from Spanish West Florida into Washington County to avoid prosecution for a criminal act, that he spoke Spanish, etc.) Still another story is said by a descendent (Ernestine Thompson) of Rose and Daniel to have been passed down through her family, to wit: That Daniel was the son of a Natchez Indian woman, fathered by a Spaniard after members of her tribe were taken as captives to Santo Domingo; that Daniel killed a man on a sailing ship and jumped ship in Mobile, from whence he fled inland and began to work for Young Gaines under the assumed name of Daniel Reed. It is all lore, with nothing to refer to for verification, and one has to be careful not to allow the lore to obfuscate the known facts. By 1730, the Natchez Indians had been almost annihilated by the French; some survivors did flee across the Mississippi River where they were taken captive by the Spanish and enslaved in Santo Domingo, while still others joined other tribes, including the Creeks. So historic events support this legend in that sense. One oral tradition heard repeatedly from disparately situated people is that two brothers descended from Baron Christophe DeGraffenreid (who led a Swiss-German group in settling the area around New Bern, NC, in 1710) changed their name to just "Reid," with one going to Alabama and the other to Texas. Supposedly, the one who went to Alabama was ancestor of Daniel and his progeny. None of these oral traditions have been documented by separate, verifiable evidence.Daniel drove cattle for Young Gaines and apparently traveled east and west from the area around St. Stephens, AL, possibly to Natchez, Mississippi, or beyond), and later he and Rose established cattle pens and overnight lodging (a stand) for drovers and other travelers at Tibbee, Alabama, near the Mississippi-Alabama border. He left a will that was probated in favor of Rose upon his death. She also left a will. An 1803 list of Washington County taxpayers lists him, the earliest document found on the Internet.Daniel apparently fathered slaves, one of whom he also had emancipated under the terms of a will by an ancestor of the Cato family so that the boy could inherit property in McIntosh, AL. Also, one Internet site states that Daniel bought his son George Reed's freedom from slavery from Young Gaines in 1828, and another descendent has verified that this was indeed correct. It has been suggested by one researcher that there were actually two Georges (one apparently a child born of a slave and the other a son born of Rose), although this is not verifiable. One noted researcher, Woodrow Wallace, frequently remarked that Daniel seemed to have been quite promiscuous with many women ?up and down the Tombigbee River valley.? In 1953, one of the most-cited studies of the "Alabama Cajans" described the then existing community:

"A strange product of the mingling of races which followed the British entry into North America survives in the presence of a number of localized strains of peoples of mixed ancestry. Presumed to be part white with varying proportions of Indian and Negro blood, they are recognized as of intermediate social status, sharing lot with neither white nor colored, and enjoying neither the governmental protection nor the tribal tie of the typical Indian descendants? The Cajans of Alabama.

"The nucleus of American settlement in Alabama was a small enclave on the west bank of the lower Tombigbee and Mobile Rivers which, in the early nineteenth century, was surrounded by Spanish Mobile to the south and Indian tribes on the other sides--Creek, Choctaw and Cherokee. Into this frontier came a free colored man named Reed, said to have been a mulatto from Jamaica; he married a slave woman, also a mulatto, whose freedom he later purchased, and the two operated a cattle-penning center in conjunction with an inn along the road into Mississippi. The Reeds had eight children, 56 grandchildren, and at least 202 great grandchildren; by today the eighth and ninth generation has appeared, and the descent of the Reeds is innumerable. A free colored couple named Byrd, who probably came into the area a little later, are known to have produced 119 great grandchildren, and a Weaver family traced back to two family heads has been equally prolific. About half of the population of over 2000 Cajans in Mobile and Washington Counties in Alabama bear the names of Weaver, Reid, and Byrd. The descendants of these families were not numerous until after the Civil War, but their previous status of freedom and their mixed race may account for their subsequent separation from the other Negroes. Certainly their rapid growth in numbers and their intermarriage of one family with another help to explain the recognition by the white population which ultimately resulted in borrowing (with a slight modification in spelling) the term Cajan from Louisiana to identify them. "Today the Cajans live in a clearly circumscribed rural area of the pine forests containing about 175 square miles. Their children attend special schools provided by the counties. Perhaps another 2000 Cajans have managed to slip into towns or cities where they are not actively thrown with the core of the group. "The Cajans have not only survived, but have steadily grown in this area of change and instability. After the cattlegrazers came the lumber and railroad camps. Geronimo's Indians were detained at nearby Mt. Vernon in 1890. Each of these transient groups and many others may have contributed blood to the Cajans.

"The exhaustion of the forests has left the slim leavings to the Cajans. Many of them are squatters on large landholdings; most of them work in the forest industries, lumbering, turpentining, hauling logs, operating sawmills. Increasing population in an area of depleted resources cannot continue indefinitely. Some of the Cajans leave the region and pass as white in distant localities; these are usually the lighter-skinned. A conservatism tends to hold most of them near home. The emigration has not kept up with the growth by reproduction, but it probably balances occasional intermarriage with whites to keep most of the residual Cajan population moderately dark-skinned." Source: ?A Geographic Analysis of White-Negro Indian-Racial Mixtures in Eastern United States,? by Edward T. Price, Los Angeles State College.


Rose continued to live on with her descendents at Tibbee after Daniel's death until her own death.Daniel and Rose had the following children: Julia (Juda) REED was born about 1811 in Washington County, AL. She married John HARRIS.Eliza REED was born about 1812 in Washington County, AL. It is Eliza?s descendents only who will be dealt with in this family history.George REED was born on 16 Feb 1815 in Washington County AL.George is shown on the 1860 Census as 48 years old, marking his birth year as 1812; he is shown as 64 on 1880 census, which would mark his birth date as 1816. George appears as a Reed on the 1860 census, as a Reid on the 1880 census. He founded the village of Reed?s Chapel, according to Matte, in 1829. That is where the center of MOWA Choctaw life is located. He is said to have fathered 11 children by his two wives, but because they, as well as the other families who remained in Alabama for the most part, are documented elsewhere and do not have a continuing relationship with that branch of the family which descended from Seaborn and Georgeanne Logan Reid and settled predominantly in south Mississippi, are not further dealt with here. George married (1) Maria COLBERT daughter of Gen William COLBERT and Jessie MONIAC. George married (2) Ellen (Fotenay) WEAVER daughter of Dave WEAVER and Cecile WEATHERFORD. Ellen was born in 1835. Matilda REED was born about 1817 in Washington County AL. Matilda married Needham BRYANT. Needham was born about 1810.William REED was born on 6 Mar 1821 in Washington County AL. He died on 11 Dec 1894 in Washington County, AL. William married Lorenda WEAVER. Lorenda was born on 24 Jun 1833 in Washington County, AL. She died on 12 Jul 1913 in Washington County, AL. Lucretia REED was born unknown in Alabama. She did not marry. Her death date is unknown.Reuben REED was born in Feb 1824 in Washington County AL. He died in 1903 in Reed?s Chapel, Washington County, AL. Reuben married Emaline WEAVER. Emaline was born in 1843 in Mobile County, AL.Emaline REED was born 10 Feb 1824 in Washington County, AL. Emaline married Willis DAUGHTERTY. Willis was born 5 Dec 1828 in Alabama. All these people would live out their lives and raise families in Washington and Mobile Counties. Their descendents are largely represented among the members of the MOWA band still residing in that area. The remainder of this family history will not be devoted to them, but to the REID descendents of Eliza REED, and in particular the family of her son, Seaborn REID.  
Reed, Daniel Bolar (I271987797479)
 
112

From secky8, The All Connected Family Tree in Ancestry;

Daniel was deemed a "free person of color," at least in the one instance in which his race is mentioned (the 1818 emancipation of his wife Rose), and on the census reports for 1830 and, apparently 1840. (Interestingly, the 1830 census for Washington County, AL, showed only Daniel Reed?s household as consisting totally of ?Free Colored;? the other three-to- four households wherein a Free Colored was enumerated all show a White Male in an apparent position of authority [head of household] within the household. The 1840 census listing for Daniel Reed?s household is an enigma, apparently occupied by three generations, one of whom is a 30-40 year old white male, another a Free Colored woman of at least 100 years, and one other Free Colored Woman of 55-100 years of age [both of whom are consistent from 1830 to 1840, although the age of the younger (Rose?) is suspect, as noted in earlier notes for Rose]. Daniel himself is apparently the 55-100 year old Free Colored Male listed. Eleven children under 24 years of age are shown.)
 
Reed, Daniel Bolar (I271987797479)
 
113

From secky8, The All Connected Family Tree in Ancestry;

There is some evidence that there was within early America three distinct classes of people not considered ?white,? as defined in an 1840 North Carolina statute: ?(A)ny free negro, mulatto, or free person of color? (31 N.C. 384, prohibiting unlicensed firearms by these three classes). One excellent article on the Internet: How the Law Decided if You Were Black or White: The Early 1800s - Essays on the Color Line and the One-Drop Rule by Frank W Sweet ,, August 11, 2004, discusses at length what factors went into a determination of a person's race, when the issue came up. Daniel's classification as a Free Person of Color may have simply meant he was darker than the average Anglo-Saxon, but not as dark as an African, but much of the classification of a person?s race in the immediate post-Colonial period and years thereafter seems to have often been based on factors other than skin color, i.e., some tracts speak to the official ?changing? of a family?s designation, apparently something that was done at the local court house. (A photo of Eliza Reed, Daniel and Rose Gaines Reed?s daughter and the author?s great-grandmother, depicts a person who would if perceived today probably be considered white, perhaps with some Indian blood, by the average viewer.) The history of America is replete with instances of marriages between white European settlers and Native Americans, with the offspring becoming ?free people of color.? Matte cites records of Portuguese REEDs migrating originally from Virginia into Alabama; historically, Portuguese were classified as "free people of color," and the term has come to be associated with what have been described in various writings as ?Melungeons? or ?tri-racial isolates.? The terms have come to be associated with people living in early America, especially in the hinterlands, including people who were a mixture of Indian and European races (perhaps obscuring the fact that there were true Portuguese people in the country). A politician?s mischaracterization of Daniel and Rose?s progeny as ?Cajuns? in the post-Civil War era totally obscured their Native American heritage. They were not Acadian. The politician later owned up to his mischaracterization. Unfortunately, the label stuck, and some researchers have suggested that the progeny may have been willing accomplices in this outcome. Following is a letter that appeared on an Internet Query Board which falls into this category: ..........From: Morris Simon >Subject: Re: CajansDate: Tue, 20 Apr 1999 12:34:19 -0500Don2717@aol.com wrote:Recently someone wrote that there were a group of mixed race people in Alabama (Mobile) who refer to themselves as Cajans. The author of the message stated that this muddies the water a little more, when trying to define Acadian, Cajun, Creole, etc..That was my original post. I wrote it to suggest that popular usage of ethnic terms like these vary considerably from one place to another, and often has nothing to do with historical or cultural accuracy. I also wanted to mention some of the most common surnames among the Alabama "cajun" group since I run into them occasionally in genealogical contexts. As I mentioned, quite a few misinformed people in this area do not distinguish this group from Louisiana cajuns.>  
Reed, Daniel Bolar (I271987797479)
 
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From the

From: Bob Eddings Subject: [EDDINGS] Dave Weaver Date: Sat, 14 Oct 2000 20:39:50 EDT

We all have seen old letters, documents, Indian claims, postings in the Mormon Library, postings on this board, etc. A review of such info will show what you find might be true or it might be totally wrong.

A lot of the info on this family came from research done by Arthur Sturgill and it is not all true.. I am sure if he was still researching (he died circa 1980-81), he would have new opinions on some of his old info.

I have reviewed much info on Dave Weaver, read many Cherokee Books, have written to the Chief of the Eastern Cherokee Tribe ( in N.C.) and have concluded several things about him. I will first respond to a couple recent postings, then discuss Dave Weaver.....

.....Dave's Birth and Death -- Dave was born circa 1760, most likely in the hills of western North Carolina. (Arthur Sturgill had said he was born in Georgia), but I am confident Sturgill was wrong. Many of the family have seen Sturgill's info and so family members all say he was born in Georgia. (I think that was not true).

Elizabeth Weaver was born in N.C. per some 1880 census reports of a couple sons. Her's and John's first few kids were said to be born in what is now Graham Co., N.C.

I feel that Dave moved to Georgia during the period 1819-1821. He died 12/1837 at a place called Cold Spring Place, a tributary of the Sharp Mountain Creek, in Cherokee Co., Ga.

When his property was evaluated in 1836 by the US Gov't, in preparation for the Trail of Tears move, Dave's property had 1 and one half acres and was valued at $19. He was about the poorest Cherokee on the list.

Chief Dave Weaver -- We have all seen old letters, etc. saying Dave was a Cherokee Chief. However, after reading many books on the Cherokees, I have never seen him listed as a chief, signing any treaties, etc.

However, he could have been a chief of his small village while he lived in N.C.

By 1800, all important Cherokee meetings, treaties, etc, were done in northern Georgia and chief from outlying districts, such as N.C., almost never attended those meetings because of the travel difficulties involved. Also, those Cherokees in eastern Tenn. and western N.C. were poor, compared to those in Georgia, who were mostly half-breeds.

The name of Dave Weaver -- I have never seen an Indian name for Dave Weaver, Elizabeth Weaver, or any of Daves several sons. I have been trying to find out when and how he and daughter Elizabeth got their Christian names of "Weaver". Most Indians acquired Christian names from white fathers or contacts with missionairies. Per the 1835 Cherokee census ("Roll"), Dave was a full blooded Cherokee, hence no white father. From books I have read, the Cherokees did not allow missionairies into their Nation , until the Morovians at Spring PLace, Ga. in 1801. Since I feel Dave was in N.C. until at least 1819, no missionaires were there until about 1808, which was about 4 years after Elizabeth Weaver married John Eddings. So how did Elizabeth acquire her Christian name before the missionaires got there?

On the 1835 Cherokee Census, Dave was there with a few other family members. I believe this was one of his sons and that sons family. After the Trail of Tears nothing is known of any of the kids., except (perhaps) his youngest son Joseph Weaver.

Dave's Wife -- From early correspondence with family members, Arthur Sturgill mentioned that Daves wife was Tooley. He also mentioned seeing some type of documents from Daves son Joseph, who said his (Joseph's) mother was Tooley.. Lately I have seen mention that Daves wife was Aquah Lih. I dont know where that originated, but I suspect that is not true.

Indian Claims of 1907 -- IN 1906 the Us Govt came up with a million dollars that was owed to Cherokee descendents. In all, there were over 30,000 claims (including roughly 200 from Daves descendents). If the govt ruled all claims were valid, each claimant would get about $30.

Mrs. Wimberlys story about getting $25,000 was obviously a dream on her part. She must have misunderstood what was going on. I am sure many have read her story, which was intersting, though not very accurate. In the long run, all of our claims were rejected and we received no money. The govt rejected them because none of Elizabeth Weaver's sons, grandsons, ever signed on a Cherokee Roll (1851, etc.) saying they were Cherokees, so they were considered as having left the tribe.

Hopefully this narrative will provide some more accurate info on Dave Weaver and perhaps provide food for thought.

Bob Eddings

 
Weaver, Dave (I272008484377)
 
115

From the Jewish Traveler


....... Return to Via San Sebastiano and turn left (here it is called Via di Cavana) and right on Via San Giorgio. At Piazza Hortis, stop to see the bronze sculpture of Svevo in front of his beloved public library. Then continue on Via San Giorgio to reach the Revoltella Museum Gallery of Modern Art (27 Via Diaz; 39-40-675-4350), housed in what was once the palazzo of Baron Revoltella. The works of FIVE JEWS are displayed prominently: Arturo Nathan (1891-1944), GINO PARIN born Federico Pollack (1876-1944), Vittorio (Haim) Bolaffio (1883-1931), Arturo Rietti (1863-1943) and Isidoro Gruenhut (1862-1898).

The Jewish cemetery, dating back to 1843, is in the southern part of the city (4 Via della Pace). In death, as in life, Trieste's wealthiest families, including the Morpurgos, are housed in lavish structures. On the site is a Holocaust memorial, twin pillars of stone inscribed with area victims names. Interred in the cemetery are Elio Schmitz (the brother of Svevo) and Umberto Beniamino Steindler, the ship captain who, during the 1930s, brought 150,000 Jews to safety in Haifa. 
Parin, Gino (I272008482350)
 
116

From TNGENWEB.ORG

BUCKNER ABERNATHY born ca 1759(?), buried Old Abernathy Cemetery, Giles County, Tennessee (Abstract of Graves of Revolutionary Patriots, Daughters of the American Revolution, Refs 57 and 59 and ) Buckner ABERNATHY?S Revolutionary War Service has not yet been confirmed. He is not found on the 1812 Giles County Tax List, but a Buckner ABERNATHY is on p. 22 of the 1820 Giles County census with one male over 45 and one female over 45 in the household (with others). The 1830 census has not been checked, but Buckner is apparently the B. ABERNATHY in the 1840 Giles County Census, p. 121 with one adult male 80-90 in the household (among others). In 1850, Buckner ABERNATHY is age 91 (born ca 1759), Virginia, in District 16, HH110. Frances THOMAS (female), age 55, North Carolina, is also in the household.

Buckner is thought to have been the son of John B. ABERNATHY who died testate, his will dated 17 Feb 1812, and recorded in Brunswick County, Virginia (Will Book 8, page 79):
In the name of God Amen-

I John ABERNATHY serv. (?) of the county of Brunswick now in tolerable health and perfect memory do this 17th day of February, in the year of our lord eighteen hundred and twelve do make and publish this my last will and testament in the following manner (Viz.) I give my son John ABERNATHY twenty five pounds per year during my residence with him for my board and clothing. If there is not money sufficient at my death to pay John ABERNATHY above mentioned then my desire is that he shall sell my land pay himself in full the balance that may be due him for my board and clothing and my desire is that my executor divide the residue of my estate between my children (except Charles ABERNATHY, the heirs of Ann HARWELL, and the heirs of Jenny DAVIS, which I shall hereafter mention). I then give and bequeath one proportion to my son Frederick ABERNATHY, to him and heirs forever. Also to John ABERNATHY, to him and his heirs forever. To Robert ABERNATHY, to him and his heirs forever. To Buckner ABERNATHY, to him and his heirs forever. To Joshua ABERNATHY, to him and his heirs forever. To Smith ABERNATHY, to him and heirs forever. I also give to children first mentioned meaning Charles ABERNATHY, the heirs of Ann HARWELL and the heirs of Jenny DAVIS fifteen shillings to be equally divided between them and their heirs forever. I constitute and appoint John ABERNATHY executor to this my last will and testament whereof I have hereunto set my hand and affixed my seal the day and year before mentioned.

John Abernathy

Acknowledged in presence of
Jesse Peterson
Richard Stith
Rawleigh H. Abernathy

Proved on ________________.

(S. Lepow, Brunswick County, VAGenWeb)
No marriage has been located for Buckner (although see below), but among the Abernathy marriages in Brunswick County, Virginia are those of Charles to Elizabeth DAVENPORT, 14 Oct 1786; Jensey to John CAIN, 1 Dec 1786; Silvy to Reuel (Revel?) LEWIS, 07 Aug 1787; Harbert to Susanna HARWELL, 22 Dec 1788; Patsey to Benager SEXTON, 04 Feb 1790, Nancy to Rowley [Rawleigh?] BROWN, 23 Dec 1790; Jarrard to Anney SADLER, 09 Jan 1794; Frederick to Milly DAVENPORT, 13 Feb 1795; Alice to Lewis KELLEY, 19 Nov 1795; Martha to Davis BROWN, 23 Nov 1795; Henry to Rebecca FIRTH, 15 Dec 1796; Jane [Jenny?] to John DAVIS, 08 Dec 1798; Nancy to John SCOGGIN, 18 Dec 1798; Rebecca to John DIXON, 07 Feb 1799; and Catherine to Robert LUCY, 22 Oct 1799 (marriage index ? records not viewed).

There are four early DAR applications for Buckner ABNERNATHY:

The National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution Volume 75, page 208. Mrs. Elise ABERNATHY McElwee. DAR ID Number: 74562 Born in Pulaski, Tenn. Wife of H. Q. MCELWEE. Descendant of Buckner Abernathy, James Boone, and Lieut. James Holland. Daughter of William Lane Abernathy (b. 1859) and Leonora Pointer (b. 1865), his wife, m. 1883. Granddaughter of Wyatt Hooper Abernathy (b. 1822) and Elizabeth M. Lane (1831-1901), his wife; Samuel Pointer (1830-81) and Cynthia Rhodes Holland (1831-71), his wife. See No. 74561. Gr-granddaughter of John Revere Abernathy (1788-1844) and Cynthia Boone (b. 1790), his wife, m. 1810. Gr-gr-granddaughter of Buckner Abernathy and Hulda Revere, his wife; James Boon and Elizabeth Bryan (1740-1850), his wife. Buckner Abernathy (1745-1850) served as a private in Captain Wallace?s company, 2nd Virginia regiment. He was born in Virginia; died in Giles County, Tenn. James Boone (1735-1805) served as a private in Captain Bailey?s company, Col. Abraham Shepard?s 10th North Carolina regiment. He was born in North Carolina.

BUCKNER ABERNATHY The National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution Volume 97, page 193 Miss Mary Lou Abernathy. DAR ID Number: 96621 Born in Giles County, Tenn. Descendant of Buckner Abernathy, and of James Boone, as follows: 1. Wyatt Harper Abernathy (1822-1901) m. 2nd 1858 Elizabeth M. Lowe (d. 1901). 2. John Rivers Abernathy (1788-1844) m. 1810 Cynthia Boone (1790-1854). 3. Buckner Abernathy m. 1779 Hulda Rivers (1755-1850); James Boone m. 1770 Elizabeth Bryan (1740-1800). Buckner Abernathy (1745-1850) served as a private in Capt. Wallace?s company, 2nd Virginia regiment. He was born in Virginia; died in Giles County, Tenn. James Boone (1735-1805) served as a private in Captain Bailey?s company, Col. Abraham Shepard?s 10th North Carolina regiment. He was born in North Carolina.

BUCKNER ABERNATHY The National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution Volume 99, page 274 Mrs. Ballie Lewis Riddle. DAR ID Number: 98866 Born in Pulaski, Tenn. Wife of George T. Riddle. Descendant of Buckner Abernathy, and of James Boone, as follows: 1. William G. Lewis (1829-94) m. 1852 Cynthia Adeline Abernathy (1834-64). 2. John Rovers Abernathy (1788-1844) m. 1810 Cynthia Boone (1790-1854). 3. Buckner Abernathy m. 1787 Hulda Rivers (1755-1835); James Boone m. 1770 Elizabeth Bryan (1740-1800). Buckner Abernathy (1745-1850) served as private in Captain Wallace?s company, 2nd Virginia regiment. He was born in Virginia; died in Giles County, Tenn. James Boone (1735-1805) served as private in Capt. Bradley?s company, Col. Abraham Shepard?s 10th North Carolina regiment. He was born and married in North Carolina.

BUCKNER ABERNATHY The National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution Volume 103, page 229 Mrs. Louise Abernathy Orchard. DAR ID Number: 102742 Born in Pulaski, Tenn. Wife of Joseph Orchard. Descendant of Buckner Abernathy and of James Boone, as follows: 1. Hyatt S. Abernathy (b. 1857) m. 1878 Elizabeth Martin (b. 1857). 2. William Thomas Abernathy (d. 1862) m. 1853 Elizabeth Franklin (b. 1836). 3. John Rivers Abernathy (1788-1844) m. 1810 Cynthia Boone (1790-1854). 4. Buckner Abernathy m. 1787 Hulda Rivers (1755-1835); James Boone m. 1770 Elizabeth Bryan (1740-1800). Buckner Abernathy (1745-1850) served as a private in Captain Wallace?s company, 2nd Virginia regiment. He was born in Virginia; died in Giles County, Tenn. James Boone (1735-1805) was a private in Captain Bradley?s company, Col. Abraham Shepard?s 10th North Carolina regiment, 1776-82. He was born in North Carolina and was married there.
 
Abernathy, Sylvia (I543656258)
 
117

From TNGENWEB.ORG

BUCKNER ABERNATHY born ca 1759(?), buried Old Abernathy Cemetery, Giles County, Tennessee (Abstract of Graves of Revolutionary Patriots, Daughters of the American Revolution, Refs 57 and 59 and ) Buckner ABERNATHY?S Revolutionary War Service has not yet been confirmed. He is not found on the 1812 Giles County Tax List, but a Buckner ABERNATHY is on p. 22 of the 1820 Giles County census with one male over 45 and one female over 45 in the household (with others). The 1830 census has not been checked, but Buckner is apparently the B. ABERNATHY in the 1840 Giles County Census, p. 121 with one adult male 80-90 in the household (among others). In 1850, Buckner ABERNATHY is age 91 (born ca 1759), Virginia, in District 16, HH110. Frances THOMAS (female), age 55, North Carolina, is also in the household.

Buckner is thought to have been the son of John B. ABERNATHY who died testate, his will dated 17 Feb 1812, and recorded in Brunswick County, Virginia (Will Book 8, page 79):
In the name of God Amen-

I John ABERNATHY serv. (?) of the county of Brunswick now in tolerable health and perfect memory do this 17th day of February, in the year of our lord eighteen hundred and twelve do make and publish this my last will and testament in the following manner (Viz.) I give my son John ABERNATHY twenty five pounds per year during my residence with him for my board and clothing. If there is not money sufficient at my death to pay John ABERNATHY above mentioned then my desire is that he shall sell my land pay himself in full the balance that may be due him for my board and clothing and my desire is that my executor divide the residue of my estate between my children (except Charles ABERNATHY, the heirs of Ann HARWELL, and the heirs of Jenny DAVIS, which I shall hereafter mention). I then give and bequeath one proportion to my son Frederick ABERNATHY, to him and heirs forever. Also to John ABERNATHY, to him and his heirs forever. To Robert ABERNATHY, to him and his heirs forever. To Buckner ABERNATHY, to him and his heirs forever. To Joshua ABERNATHY, to him and his heirs forever. To Smith ABERNATHY, to him and heirs forever. I also give to children first mentioned meaning Charles ABERNATHY, the heirs of Ann HARWELL and the heirs of Jenny DAVIS fifteen shillings to be equally divided between them and their heirs forever. I constitute and appoint John ABERNATHY executor to this my last will and testament whereof I have hereunto set my hand and affixed my seal the day and year before mentioned.

John Abernathy

Acknowledged in presence of
Jesse Peterson
Richard Stith
Rawleigh H. Abernathy

Proved on ________________.

(S. Lepow, Brunswick County, VAGenWeb)
No marriage has been located for Buckner (although see below), but among the Abernathy marriages in Brunswick County, Virginia are those of Charles to Elizabeth DAVENPORT, 14 Oct 1786; Jensey to John CAIN, 1 Dec 1786; Silvy to Reuel (Revel?) LEWIS, 07 Aug 1787; Harbert to Susanna HARWELL, 22 Dec 1788; Patsey to Benager SEXTON, 04 Feb 1790, Nancy to Rowley [Rawleigh?] BROWN, 23 Dec 1790; Jarrard to Anney SADLER, 09 Jan 1794; Frederick to Milly DAVENPORT, 13 Feb 1795; Alice to Lewis KELLEY, 19 Nov 1795; Martha to Davis BROWN, 23 Nov 1795; Henry to Rebecca FIRTH, 15 Dec 1796; Jane [Jenny?] to John DAVIS, 08 Dec 1798; Nancy to John SCOGGIN, 18 Dec 1798; Rebecca to John DIXON, 07 Feb 1799; and Catherine to Robert LUCY, 22 Oct 1799 (marriage index ? records not viewed).

 
Abernathy, Frederick F (I543655469)
 
118

From TNGENWEB.ORG

BUCKNER ABERNATHY born ca 1759(?), buried Old Abernathy Cemetery, Giles County, Tennessee (Abstract of Graves of Revolutionary Patriots, Daughters of the American Revolution, Refs 57 and 59 and ) Buckner ABERNATHY?S Revolutionary War Service has not yet been confirmed. He is not found on the 1812 Giles County Tax List, but a Buckner ABERNATHY is on p. 22 of the 1820 Giles County census with one male over 45 and one female over 45 in the household (with others). The 1830 census has not been checked, but Buckner is apparently the B. ABERNATHY in the 1840 Giles County Census, p. 121 with one adult male 80-90 in the household (among others). In 1850, Buckner ABERNATHY is age 91 (born ca 1759), Virginia, in District 16, HH110. Frances THOMAS (female), age 55, North Carolina, is also in the household.

Buckner is thought to have been the son of John B. ABERNATHY who died testate, his will dated 17 Feb 1812, and recorded in Brunswick County, Virginia (Will Book 8, page 79):
In the name of God Amen-

I John ABERNATHY serv. (?) of the county of Brunswick now in tolerable health and perfect memory do this 17th day of February, in the year of our lord eighteen hundred and twelve do make and publish this my last will and testament in the following manner (Viz.) I give my son John ABERNATHY twenty five pounds per year during my residence with him for my board and clothing. If there is not money sufficient at my death to pay John ABERNATHY above mentioned then my desire is that he shall sell my land pay himself in full the balance that may be due him for my board and clothing and my desire is that my executor divide the residue of my estate between my children (except Charles ABERNATHY, the heirs of Ann HARWELL, and the heirs of Jenny DAVIS, which I shall hereafter mention). I then give and bequeath one proportion to my son Frederick ABERNATHY, to him and heirs forever. Also to John ABERNATHY, to him and his heirs forever. To Robert ABERNATHY, to him and his heirs forever. To Buckner ABERNATHY, to him and his heirs forever. To Joshua ABERNATHY, to him and his heirs forever. To Smith ABERNATHY, to him and heirs forever. I also give to children first mentioned meaning Charles ABERNATHY, the heirs of Ann HARWELL and the heirs of Jenny DAVIS fifteen shillings to be equally divided between them and their heirs forever. I constitute and appoint John ABERNATHY executor to this my last will and testament whereof I have hereunto set my hand and affixed my seal the day and year before mentioned.

John Abernathy

Acknowledged in presence of
Jesse Peterson
Richard Stith
Rawleigh H. Abernathy

Proved on ________________.

(S. Lepow, Brunswick County, VAGenWeb)
No marriage has been located for Buckner (although see below), but among the Abernathy marriages in Brunswick County, Virginia are those of Charles to Elizabeth DAVENPORT, 14 Oct 1786; Jensey to John CAIN, 1 Dec 1786; Silvy to Reuel (Revel?) LEWIS, 07 Aug 1787; Harbert to Susanna HARWELL, 22 Dec 1788; Patsey to Benager SEXTON, 04 Feb 1790, Nancy to Rowley [Rawleigh?] BROWN, 23 Dec 1790; Jarrard to Anney SADLER, 09 Jan 1794; Frederick to Milly DAVENPORT, 13 Feb 1795; Alice to Lewis KELLEY, 19 Nov 1795; Martha to Davis BROWN, 23 Nov 1795; Henry to Rebecca FIRTH, 15 Dec 1796; Jane [Jenny?] to John DAVIS, 08 Dec 1798; Nancy to John SCOGGIN, 18 Dec 1798; Rebecca to John DIXON, 07 Feb 1799; and Catherine to Robert LUCY, 22 Oct 1799 (marriage index ? records not viewed).


 
Abernathy, Nancy (I1809003343)
 
119

From TNGENWEB.ORG

BUCKNER ABERNATHY born ca 1759(?), buried Old Abernathy Cemetery, Giles County, Tennessee (Abstract of Graves of Revolutionary Patriots, Daughters of the American Revolution, Refs 57 and 59 and ) Buckner ABERNATHY?S Revolutionary War Service has not yet been confirmed. He is not found on the 1812 Giles County Tax List, but a Buckner ABERNATHY is on p. 22 of the 1820 Giles County census with one male over 45 and one female over 45 in the household (with others). The 1830 census has not been checked, but Buckner is apparently the B. ABERNATHY in the 1840 Giles County Census, p. 121 with one adult male 80-90 in the household (among others). In 1850, Buckner ABERNATHY is age 91 (born ca 1759), Virginia, in District 16, HH110. Frances THOMAS (female), age 55, North Carolina, is also in the household.

Buckner is thought to have been the son of John B. ABERNATHY who died testate, his will dated 17 Feb 1812, and recorded in Brunswick County, Virginia (Will Book 8, page 79):
In the name of God Amen-

I John ABERNATHY serv. (?) of the county of Brunswick now in tolerable health and perfect memory do this 17th day of February, in the year of our lord eighteen hundred and twelve do make and publish this my last will and testament in the following manner (Viz.) I give my son John ABERNATHY twenty five pounds per year during my residence with him for my board and clothing. If there is not money sufficient at my death to pay John ABERNATHY above mentioned then my desire is that he shall sell my land pay himself in full the balance that may be due him for my board and clothing and my desire is that my executor divide the residue of my estate between my children (except Charles ABERNATHY, the heirs of Ann HARWELL, and the heirs of Jenny DAVIS, which I shall hereafter mention). I then give and bequeath one proportion to my son Frederick ABERNATHY, to him and heirs forever. Also to John ABERNATHY, to him and his heirs forever. To Robert ABERNATHY, to him and his heirs forever. To Buckner ABERNATHY, to him and his heirs forever. To Joshua ABERNATHY, to him and his heirs forever. To Smith ABERNATHY, to him and heirs forever. I also give to children first mentioned meaning Charles ABERNATHY, the heirs of Ann HARWELL and the heirs of Jenny DAVIS fifteen shillings to be equally divided between them and their heirs forever. I constitute and appoint John ABERNATHY executor to this my last will and testament whereof I have hereunto set my hand and affixed my seal the day and year before mentioned.

John Abernathy

Acknowledged in presence of
Jesse Peterson
Richard Stith
Rawleigh H. Abernathy

Proved on ________________.

(S. Lepow, Brunswick County, VAGenWeb)
No marriage has been located for Buckner (although see below), but among the Abernathy marriages in Brunswick County, Virginia are those of Charles to Elizabeth DAVENPORT, 14 Oct 1786; Jensey to John CAIN, 1 Dec 1786; Silvy to Reuel (Revel?) LEWIS, 07 Aug 1787; Harbert to Susanna HARWELL, 22 Dec 1788; Patsey to Benager SEXTON, 04 Feb 1790, Nancy to Rowley [Rawleigh?] BROWN, 23 Dec 1790; Jarrard to Anney SADLER, 09 Jan 1794; Frederick to Milly DAVENPORT, 13 Feb 1795; Alice to Lewis KELLEY, 19 Nov 1795; Martha to Davis BROWN, 23 Nov 1795; Henry to Rebecca FIRTH, 15 Dec 1796; Jane [Jenny?] to John DAVIS, 08 Dec 1798; Nancy to John SCOGGIN, 18 Dec 1798; Rebecca to John DIXON, 07 Feb 1799; and Catherine to Robert LUCY, 22 Oct 1799 (marriage index ? records not viewed).

 
Abernathy, Elizabeth Catherine (I1808754380)
 
120

From: A Catalogue of the Names of the Early Puritan Settlers of the Colony of Connecticut
By: Royal Ralph Hinman




ABERNETHE, (Ebernethe, Ebernathe, Ebernatha,) WILLIAM, a Scotchman, was early in Connecticut, first at Branford, and from thence to Wallingford. He first married Sarah Feb. 17, 1673, and married Elizabeth for his second wife. His children at Wallingford, were Elizabeth, b. Oct. 15, 1673; William, Jr., b. July 23, 1675; Sarah, b. Oct. 10, 1677 ; Mary, b. March 27, 1679? 80; Samuel, b. Jan. 10, 1683, d. March 14, 1723 ; Daniel, b. Sept. 30, 1686,d. Oct. 31, 1723; Susannah, b. July 18, 1689; Damaris, daughter of William and Sarah, b. Aug. 31, l7._.

ABERNETHE, SAMUEL,-son of William, Sen., married Elizabeth Peck, Aug. 10, 1710; issue, Abraham, b. March 1, 1712; probably others.

ABERNETHE, WILLIAM, Jr., and wife Mary, had children, Sarah, b. Dec. 15, 1705; Caleb, b. Feb. 11, 1710; Ann, b. June '7, 1706; John, b. Feb. 27, 1708; Susannah, b. April 28, 1712; Joseph, b. June 20, 1714; Hannah, b. Aug. 30, 17?; John, b. ? Jemima, daughter of William and Mary, b. Aug. 29, 1702; perhaps others.

ABERNATHE, ENOS, of Wallingford, married Beulah, and had issue: Samuel, b. May 5, 1738; Naomi, b. Oct. 6, 1739; Benjamin, b. Aug. 13. 1741 ; 2d Samuel, d. April 11, 1742, and Benjamin, d. Jan. 3,1741?2; Naomi, d. June 2, 1742; 2d Naomi, d. Jan. 4, 1743; 2d Samuel, b. Aug. 23, 1744; Beulah, b. March 28, 1746; Abigail, b. Nov. 27, 1748.

SUSANNAH, daughter of ?-?, m. Samuel Yale, March 11, 1736. SARAH ABERNETHE, m. Thomas Doolittle, (by Capt. Yale,) May 27, 1730. ELIZABETH EBENETHE, was m. by Capt. Hall, to Wm. Hough, Dec. 14, 1726. SUSANNA ABERNETHA, m. George Merriman, Jan. 8, 1713. JEMlMA,daughter of ?'illiam, Jr., and Mary, in. John Curtis, June 17,1723. ELIZABETH ABERNATHA, m. John Ward, May 11,1736. MARTHA ABERNATHA, m. Job Brockett, Feb. 27, 1750?1, by Rev. Philemon Robbins. ABIGAIL ABERNATHA, m. Robert Collins, May 4, 1736. ANNA d. Nov. 23,1726. JOHN, son of William and hiary Abernatha, ? was struck dead, by thunder,? 810. May 12, 1727. WILLIAM EBERNATHA, d. Feb. 17, 1728. .JESSE ABERNETHE, d. Dec. 2, 1741. JARED, son of Caleb, m. Lois Thompson, daughter of Dea. Gideon, of Goshen, May 26, 1766, and had a son Cyrus, b. there, June 11, 1767. \VAITE ABERNETHE and DAMARIS ABE RNETHE witnessed the will of Mathew Bel]amy, of Wallirégrford, in 1744. 
Abernethy, Samuel (I1191199024)
 
121

From: A Catalogue of the Names of the Early Puritan Settlers of the Colony of Connecticut
By: Royal Ralph Hinman




ABERNETHE, (Ebernethe, Ebernathe, Ebernatha,) WILLIAM, a Scotchman, was early in Connecticut, first at Branford, and from thence to Wallingford. He first married Sarah Feb. 17, 1673, and married Elizabeth for his second wife. His children at Wallingford, were Elizabeth, b. Oct. 15, 1673; William, Jr., b. July 23, 1675; Sarah, b. Oct. 10, 1677 ; Mary, b. March 27, 1679? 80; Samuel, b. Jan. 10, 1683, d. March 14, 1723 ; Daniel, b. Sept. 30, 1686,d. Oct. 31, 1723; Susannah, b. July 18, 1689; Damaris, daughter of William and Sarah, b. Aug. 31, l7._.

ABERNETHE, SAMUEL,-son of William, Sen., married Elizabeth Peck, Aug. 10, 1710; issue, Abraham, b. March 1, 1712; probably others.

ABERNETHE, WILLIAM, Jr., and wife Mary, had children, Sarah, b. Dec. 15, 1705; Caleb, b. Feb. 11, 1710; Ann, b. June '7, 1706; John, b. Feb. 27, 1708; Susannah, b. April 28, 1712; Joseph, b. June 20, 1714; Hannah, b. Aug. 30, 17?; John, b. ? Jemima, daughter of William and Mary, b. Aug. 29, 1702; perhaps others.

ABERNATHE, ENOS, of Wallingford, married Beulah, and had issue: Samuel, b. May 5, 1738; Naomi, b. Oct. 6, 1739; Benjamin, b. Aug. 13. 1741 ; 2d Samuel, d. April 11, 1742, and Benjamin, d. Jan. 3,1741?2; Naomi, d. June 2, 1742; 2d Naomi, d. Jan. 4, 1743; 2d Samuel, b. Aug. 23, 1744; Beulah, b. March 28, 1746; Abigail, b. Nov. 27, 1748.

SUSANNAH, daughter of ?-?, m. Samuel Yale, March 11, 1736. SARAH ABERNETHE, m. Thomas Doolittle, (by Capt. Yale,) May 27, 1730. ELIZABETH EBENETHE, was m. by Capt. Hall, to Wm. Hough, Dec. 14, 1726. SUSANNA ABERNETHA, m. George Merriman, Jan. 8, 1713. JEMlMA,daughter of ?'illiam, Jr., and Mary, in. John Curtis, June 17,1723. ELIZABETH ABERNATHA, m. John Ward, May 11,1736. MARTHA ABERNATHA, m. Job Brockett, Feb. 27, 1750?1, by Rev. Philemon Robbins. ABIGAIL ABERNATHA, m. Robert Collins, May 4, 1736. ANNA d. Nov. 23,1726. JOHN, son of William and hiary Abernatha, ? was struck dead, by thunder,? 810. May 12, 1727. WILLIAM EBERNATHA, d. Feb. 17, 1728. .JESSE ABERNETHE, d. Dec. 2, 1741. JARED, son of Caleb, m. Lois Thompson, daughter of Dea. Gideon, of Goshen, May 26, 1766, and had a son Cyrus, b. there, June 11, 1767. \VAITE ABERNETHE and DAMARIS ABE RNETHE witnessed the will of Mathew Bel]amy, of Wallirégrford, in 1744. 
Abernethy, Elizabeth (I1191199007)
 
122

From: A Catalogue of the Names of the Early Puritan Settlers of the Colony of Connecticut
By: Royal Ralph Hinman




ABERNETHE, (Ebernethe, Ebernathe, Ebernatha,) WILLIAM, a Scotchman, was early in Connecticut, first at Branford, and from thence to Wallingford. He first married Sarah Feb. 17, 1673, and married Elizabeth for his second wife. His children at Wallingford, were Elizabeth, b. Oct. 15, 1673; William, Jr., b. July 23, 1675; Sarah, b. Oct. 10, 1677 ; Mary, b. March 27, 1679? 80; Samuel, b. Jan. 10, 1683, d. March 14, 1723 ; Daniel, b. Sept. 30, 1686,d. Oct. 31, 1723; Susannah, b. July 18, 1689; Damaris, daughter of William and Sarah, b. Aug. 31, l7._.

ABERNETHE, SAMUEL,-son of William, Sen., married Elizabeth Peck, Aug. 10, 1710; issue, Abraham, b. March 1, 1712; probably others.

ABERNETHE, WILLIAM, Jr., and wife Mary, had children, Sarah, b. Dec. 15, 1705; Caleb, b. Feb. 11, 1710; Ann, b. June '7, 1706; John, b. Feb. 27, 1708; Susannah, b. April 28, 1712; Joseph, b. June 20, 1714; Hannah, b. Aug. 30, 17?; John, b. ? Jemima, daughter of William and Mary, b. Aug. 29, 1702; perhaps others.

ABERNATHE, ENOS, of Wallingford, married Beulah, and had issue: Samuel, b. May 5, 1738; Naomi, b. Oct. 6, 1739; Benjamin, b. Aug. 13. 1741 ; 2d Samuel, d. April 11, 1742, and Benjamin, d. Jan. 3,1741?2; Naomi, d. June 2, 1742; 2d Naomi, d. Jan. 4, 1743; 2d Samuel, b. Aug. 23, 1744; Beulah, b. March 28, 1746; Abigail, b. Nov. 27, 1748.

SUSANNAH, daughter of ?-?, m. Samuel Yale, March 11, 1736. SARAH ABERNETHE, m. Thomas Doolittle, (by Capt. Yale,) May 27, 1730. ELIZABETH EBENETHE, was m. by Capt. Hall, to Wm. Hough, Dec. 14, 1726. SUSANNA ABERNETHA, m. George Merriman, Jan. 8, 1713. JEMlMA,daughter of ?'illiam, Jr., and Mary, in. John Curtis, June 17,1723. ELIZABETH ABERNATHA, m. John Ward, May 11,1736. MARTHA ABERNATHA, m. Job Brockett, Feb. 27, 1750?1, by Rev. Philemon Robbins. ABIGAIL ABERNATHA, m. Robert Collins, May 4, 1736. ANNA d. Nov. 23,1726. JOHN, son of William and hiary Abernatha, ? was struck dead, by thunder,? 810. May 12, 1727. WILLIAM EBERNATHA, d. Feb. 17, 1728. .JESSE ABERNETHE, d. Dec. 2, 1741. JARED, son of Caleb, m. Lois Thompson, daughter of Dea. Gideon, of Goshen, May 26, 1766, and had a son Cyrus, b. there, June 11, 1767. \VAITE ABERNETHE and DAMARIS ABE RNETHE witnessed the will of Mathew Bel]amy, of Wallirégrford, in 1744. 
Abernethy, Jesse Jasper (I1808648157)
 
123

From: A Catalogue of the Names of the Early Puritan Settlers of the Colony of Connecticut
By: Royal Ralph Hinman




ABERNETHE, (Ebernethe, Ebernathe, Ebernatha,) WILLIAM, a Scotchman, was early in Connecticut, first at Branford, and from thence to Wallingford. He first married Sarah Feb. 17, 1673, and married Elizabeth for his second wife. His children at Wallingford, were Elizabeth, b. Oct. 15, 1673; William, Jr., b. July 23, 1675; Sarah, b. Oct. 10, 1677 ; Mary, b. March 27, 1679? 80; Samuel, b. Jan. 10, 1683, d. March 14, 1723 ; Daniel, b. Sept. 30, 1686,d. Oct. 31, 1723; Susannah, b. July 18, 1689; Damaris, daughter of William and Sarah, b. Aug. 31, l7._.

ABERNETHE, SAMUEL,-son of William, Sen., married Elizabeth Peck, Aug. 10, 1710; issue, Abraham, b. March 1, 1712; probably others.

ABERNETHE, WILLIAM, Jr., and wife Mary, had children, Sarah, b. Dec. 15, 1705; Caleb, b. Feb. 11, 1710; Ann, b. June '7, 1706; John, b. Feb. 27, 1708; Susannah, b. April 28, 1712; Joseph, b. June 20, 1714; Hannah, b. Aug. 30, 17?; John, b. ? Jemima, daughter of William and Mary, b. Aug. 29, 1702; perhaps others.

ABERNATHE, ENOS, of Wallingford, married Beulah, and had issue: Samuel, b. May 5, 1738; Naomi, b. Oct. 6, 1739; Benjamin, b. Aug. 13. 1741 ; 2d Samuel, d. April 11, 1742, and Benjamin, d. Jan. 3,1741?2; Naomi, d. June 2, 1742; 2d Naomi, d. Jan. 4, 1743; 2d Samuel, b. Aug. 23, 1744; Beulah, b. March 28, 1746; Abigail, b. Nov. 27, 1748.

SUSANNAH, daughter of ?-?, m. Samuel Yale, March 11, 1736. SARAH ABERNETHE, m. Thomas Doolittle, (by Capt. Yale,) May 27, 1730. ELIZABETH EBENETHE, was m. by Capt. Hall, to Wm. Hough, Dec. 14, 1726. SUSANNA ABERNETHA, m. George Merriman, Jan. 8, 1713. JEMlMA,daughter of ?'illiam, Jr., and Mary, in. John Curtis, June 17,1723. ELIZABETH ABERNATHA, m. John Ward, May 11,1736. MARTHA ABERNATHA, m. Job Brockett, Feb. 27, 1750?1, by Rev. Philemon Robbins. ABIGAIL ABERNATHA, m. Robert Collins, May 4, 1736. ANNA d. Nov. 23,1726. JOHN, son of William and hiary Abernatha, ? was struck dead, by thunder,? 810. May 12, 1727. WILLIAM EBERNATHA, d. Feb. 17, 1728. .JESSE ABERNETHE, d. Dec. 2, 1741. JARED, son of Caleb, m. Lois Thompson, daughter of Dea. Gideon, of Goshen, May 26, 1766, and had a son Cyrus, b. there, June 11, 1767. \VAITE ABERNETHE and DAMARIS ABE RNETHE witnessed the will of Mathew Bel]amy, of Wallirégrford, in 1744. 
Abernethy, Jared (I1191199061)
 
124

From: A Catalogue of the Names of the Early Puritan Settlers of the Colony of Connecticut
By: Royal Ralph Hinman




ABERNETHE, (Ebernethe, Ebernathe, Ebernatha,) WILLIAM, a Scotchman, was early in Connecticut, first at Branford, and from thence to Wallingford. He first married Sarah Feb. 17, 1673, and married Elizabeth for his second wife. His children at Wallingford, were Elizabeth, b. Oct. 15, 1673; William, Jr., b. July 23, 1675; Sarah, b. Oct. 10, 1677 ; Mary, b. March 27, 1679? 80; Samuel, b. Jan. 10, 1683, d. March 14, 1723 ; Daniel, b. Sept. 30, 1686,d. Oct. 31, 1723; Susannah, b. July 18, 1689; Damaris, daughter of William and Sarah, b. Aug. 31, l7._.

ABERNETHE, SAMUEL,-son of William, Sen., married Elizabeth Peck, Aug. 10, 1710; issue, Abraham, b. March 1, 1712; probably others.

ABERNETHE, WILLIAM, Jr., and wife Mary, had children, Sarah, b. Dec. 15, 1705; Caleb, b. Feb. 11, 1710; Ann, b. June '7, 1706; John, b. Feb. 27, 1708; Susannah, b. April 28, 1712; Joseph, b. June 20, 1714; Hannah, b. Aug. 30, 17?; John, b. ? Jemima, daughter of William and Mary, b. Aug. 29, 1702; perhaps others.

ABERNATHE, ENOS, of Wallingford, married Beulah, and had issue: Samuel, b. May 5, 1738; Naomi, b. Oct. 6, 1739; Benjamin, b. Aug. 13. 1741 ; 2d Samuel, d. April 11, 1742, and Benjamin, d. Jan. 3,1741?2; Naomi, d. June 2, 1742; 2d Naomi, d. Jan. 4, 1743; 2d Samuel, b. Aug. 23, 1744; Beulah, b. March 28, 1746; Abigail, b. Nov. 27, 1748.

SUSANNAH, daughter of ?-?, m. Samuel Yale, March 11, 1736. SARAH ABERNETHE, m. Thomas Doolittle, (by Capt. Yale,) May 27, 1730. ELIZABETH EBENETHE, was m. by Capt. Hall, to Wm. Hough, Dec. 14, 1726. SUSANNA ABERNETHA, m. George Merriman, Jan. 8, 1713. JEMlMA,daughter of ?'illiam, Jr., and Mary, in. John Curtis, June 17,1723. ELIZABETH ABERNATHA, m. John Ward, May 11,1736. MARTHA ABERNATHA, m. Job Brockett, Feb. 27, 1750?1, by Rev. Philemon Robbins. ABIGAIL ABERNATHA, m. Robert Collins, May 4, 1736. ANNA d. Nov. 23,1726. JOHN, son of William and hiary Abernatha, ? was struck dead, by thunder,? 810. May 12, 1727. WILLIAM EBERNATHA, d. Feb. 17, 1728. .JESSE ABERNETHE, d. Dec. 2, 1741. JARED, son of Caleb, m. Lois Thompson, daughter of Dea. Gideon, of Goshen, May 26, 1766, and had a son Cyrus, b. there, June 11, 1767. \VAITE ABERNETHE and DAMARIS ABE RNETHE witnessed the will of Mathew Bel]amy, of Wallirégrford, in 1744. 
Abernethy, Cyrus (I1808647921)
 
125

From: A Catalogue of the Names of the Early Puritan Settlers of the Colony of Connecticut
By: Royal Ralph Hinman




ABERNETHE, (Ebernethe, Ebernathe, Ebernatha,) WILLIAM, a Scotchman, was early in Connecticut, first at Branford, and from thence to Wallingford. He first married Sarah Feb. 17, 1673, and married Elizabeth for his second wife. His children at Wallingford, were Elizabeth, b. Oct. 15, 1673; William, Jr., b. July 23, 1675; Sarah, b. Oct. 10, 1677 ; Mary, b. March 27, 1679? 80; Samuel, b. Jan. 10, 1683, d. March 14, 1723 ; Daniel, b. Sept. 30, 1686,d. Oct. 31, 1723; Susannah, b. July 18, 1689; Damaris, daughter of William and Sarah, b. Aug. 31, l7._.

ABERNETHE, SAMUEL,-son of William, Sen., married Elizabeth Peck, Aug. 10, 1710; issue, Abraham, b. March 1, 1712; probably others.

ABERNETHE, WILLIAM, Jr., and wife Mary, had children, Sarah, b. Dec. 15, 1705; Caleb, b. Feb. 11, 1710; Ann, b. June '7, 1706; John, b. Feb. 27, 1708; Susannah, b. April 28, 1712; Joseph, b. June 20, 1714; Hannah, b. Aug. 30, 17?; John, b. ? Jemima, daughter of William and Mary, b. Aug. 29, 1702; perhaps others.

ABERNATHE, ENOS, of Wallingford, married Beulah, and had issue: Samuel, b. May 5, 1738; Naomi, b. Oct. 6, 1739; Benjamin, b. Aug. 13. 1741 ; 2d Samuel, d. April 11, 1742, and Benjamin, d. Jan. 3,1741?2; Naomi, d. June 2, 1742; 2d Naomi, d. Jan. 4, 1743; 2d Samuel, b. Aug. 23, 1744; Beulah, b. March 28, 1746; Abigail, b. Nov. 27, 1748.

SUSANNAH, daughter of ?-?, m. Samuel Yale, March 11, 1736. SARAH ABERNETHE, m. Thomas Doolittle, (by Capt. Yale,) May 27, 1730. ELIZABETH EBENETHE, was m. by Capt. Hall, to Wm. Hough, Dec. 14, 1726. SUSANNA ABERNETHA, m. George Merriman, Jan. 8, 1713. JEMlMA,daughter of ?'illiam, Jr., and Mary, in. John Curtis, June 17,1723. ELIZABETH ABERNATHA, m. John Ward, May 11,1736. MARTHA ABERNATHA, m. Job Brockett, Feb. 27, 1750?1, by Rev. Philemon Robbins. ABIGAIL ABERNATHA, m. Robert Collins, May 4, 1736. ANNA d. Nov. 23,1726. JOHN, son of William and hiary Abernatha, ? was struck dead, by thunder,? 810. May 12, 1727. WILLIAM EBERNATHA, d. Feb. 17, 1728. .JESSE ABERNETHE, d. Dec. 2, 1741. JARED, son of Caleb, m. Lois Thompson, daughter of Dea. Gideon, of Goshen, May 26, 1766, and had a son Cyrus, b. there, June 11, 1767. \VAITE ABERNETHE and DAMARIS ABE RNETHE witnessed the will of Mathew Bel]amy, of Wallirégrford, in 1744.

ABERNATHA, CALEB, son of William and Mary, m. Lois Gaylord, of Wallingford, (by Capt. Yale,) Sept. 26, 1733. Issue, William, b. July 1, 1734; Mary, b. Nov. 18, 1736, d. Nov. 29, 1736; John, b. July 2, 1738; 2d Mary, b. Dec. 9, 1739; Jared, b. Oct. 81, 1741.

About 1743, the above Caleb and Lois removed to Farmington, (in that part of the town now Bristol,) where the following children are recorded, viz: Giles, b. Dec. 3, 1744; Waite, b. Dec. 16, 1745; Caleb, Jr., b. April 8, 1748, d. 1751 ; Lois, b. April 10, 1750, m. William ?~?; Ann, b. March 15, 1754; Mary, b. , m. Daniel Bacon, Oct. 24, 1765; Caleb, d. 1759. His son John was executor of his will. The foregoing are the ancestors of those of the name, at Harwinton, Torringford, Washington, Woodbury, Bridgeport, and other towns in Connecticut. As imperfect as the foregoing list is, it may aid them in perfecting a full roll of their ancestors. Four of the name had graduated at Yale College, before 1851.

ABERNETH has one coat of arms. ABERNETHY has three coats of arms.

This name is often found upon the records, spelled Ebernathe, Ebernatha, and Ebernetha, kc. 
Abernethy, Jared (I1191199061)
 
126

From: Historical Sketch of the Congregational Society and CHurch in Bristol, Connecticut:

.....In 1742,Caleb Abernethy, from Wallingford, bought
and settled upon the corner lot south of Orrin L.
Botsford's slaughter. The Harwinton and Wolcot-
ville Abernethy s are descendants of this man...... 
Abernethy, Caleb Sr (I1191199077)
 
127

From: Tennessee State Library and Archives; Acts of Tennessee, 1796-1850:

Hord Eldridge 1841 45 167.3 Sullivan County - Kingsport Wool Manufacturing Company 
Hord, Eldridge (I272008483103)
 
128

From: Tennessee State Library and Archives; Acts of Tennessee, 1796-1850:

Horde William 1829 33 Private 300 Knox County - to receive refund if lawsuit lost
Hord William 1837 43 174.1 Hawkins County - Knoxville and Rogersville Turnpike Company
Hord William S. 1849 50 16.5 Farmer's Manufacturing Company incorporated
 
Hord, Private William (I272008489345)
 
129

From: The Doolittle Family in America by William Frederick Doolittle MD.; Cleveland 1901. 
Abernethy, Elizabeth (I1191199007)
 
130

Gainsville History

In 1824, after Florida was annexed to the United States, Alachua County was created with Newnansville near present-day Alachua as the county seat. The population expanded with an influx of planters and farmers as Florida achieved statehood in 1845. When the proposed Florida Railroad linking Fernandina and Cedar Key bypassed Newnansville, Alachua County residents voted to create a new town on the railroad line and make it the county seat. Gainesville, named in honor of Seminole Indian War General Edmund P. Gaines, was founded on September 6, 1853. 
Gaines, Brevet Major General Edmund Pendleton (I272008484074)
 
131

GDCH:"Holland 1758."

Rev. soldier.

According to Maryly Penrose in her "Compendium of Early Mohawk Valley Families" , the first son's middle name was that of the paternal grandfather, the second of the maternal grandfather, and the third of the father. If Christian is the 3rd son, it is suggested that Joseph is for real

Not much convincing data about Joseph but according to the Palatine naming convention, the first son's middle name is the same as his great grandfather's, the second as the grandfathers and the third as the father. One might expect the third son's name here to be Christian, which it is. Is Joseph the 2nd?

? which convention is correct?

Book "NY in the Rev. as colony and state" Joseph Shelp, private in the 4th line reg commanded by Col. J Holmes. Also noted in "Index to Rev War Service Records" Doc in Barretts file.


IGI Record (from LDS Family Search On-Line)
Joseph SHELP
Sex: M
Event(s):
Birth: 1756, Netherlands
Parents:
Father: Johann Shelp
Mother: Maria Elizabeth BiermannSource information:
Film Number: 2034686
Page Number:
Reference Number:
c.) 1999 by Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved- English approval@ 3/1999
Last updalcd: 3/22/1999

Not much convincing data about Joseph but according to the Palatine naming convention, the first son's middle name is the same as his great grandfather's, the second as the grandfathers and the third as the father. One might expect the third son's name here to be Christian, which it is. Is Joseph the 2nd?




 
Shelp, Joseph (I10073475043)
 
132

Genealogical Ramblings
Questions on Early Choctaw Relationships
by Jennifer Mieirs on 06/22/10

Anyone launching themselves into this sort of early research must by necessity read Swanton on the Choctaw. He discusses the family relationships, and while it doesn't answer all questions, it certainly helps. One of the best example's of the earliest testimonies that names relatives and defines them is the testimony of Robert Cole in 1838. In it he names relatives, states for example, Nelson is my brother in law. Charles Frazier is my brother in law. Joseph Perry is sort of a brother in law. Atoka is my son, in English would be nephew. Billy Frazier is my half brother, mother's are sisters. When Cole names Greenwood Leflore as his nephew, it is in the same context as the letters Mushulatubbee wrote also naming Peter Pitchlynn his nephew in 1830. The Choctaw have no distinction between generations, they won't say Great Nephew, or second cousin. If a relationship exists, it is often in the most simplest terms.

 
KUL-IH-O-KA, Kalioka (I271987797482)
 
133

General Notes: From: Hampshire County, Virginia (Now West Virginia): Volume I--Minute Book Abstracts 1788-1802, page 95

16 July 1798

Ordered that the following persons be recommended to his excellency the governor and council as fit and proper persons be commissioned to execute the offices for which they are recommended respectively within the county and distinguished by the first and second Battalion in manner and form following to wit Second Battalion - John Perrill, Gent., Major James Smith Captain, Archibald Linthicum, Lieutenant and Erasmus Tucker Ensign - William Perrill Captain, Gabriel Throckmorton Lieutenant and Stephen Hickle Ensign - First Batalion, Robert Koyle Captain, Rawleigh Mollohan Lieutenant, Jacob Putnam Ensign - SAMUEL ABERNATHY CAPTAIN, William Donaldson Lieutenant, Charles Taylor Ensign. Page 159 
Abernathy, Captain Samuel (I1808647901)
 
134

George Strother Gaines (1784-1873): A Leader of Two States, A Servant of Two Peoples

By Gene C. Fant Jr.

Sometimes people achieve great influence during their lifetimes, but history reduces them at best to a minimal footnote. George Strother Gaines is one of these people although the Mobile Register once termed him ?The Patriarch of Alabama and Mississippi.? He was an early leader in both states, and he gave up a great portion of his personal wealth to help his Choctaw Indian friends during their relocation to the West. These achievements are little known today.
Early life

Captain James Gaines, George?s father, was a Revolutionary War leader, and his wife, Elizabeth Strother, came from an influential Virginia family. Their house, where George was born, straddled the Virginia and North Carolina state lines, so many of their thirteen children were born in different rooms and, therefore, different states. Soon after George?s birth in 1784, the family relocated to Gallatin, Tennessee, near Nashville. George, the eleventh child, was close to his older brother, Edmund P. Gaines, who rose to the rank of major general in the U. S. Army and was an important military leader in the War of 1812. Edmund led in the 1807 capture of Aaron Burr. Burr, vice president of the United States from 1801 to 1805, had killed Alexander Hamilton in a duel and fled to escape trial. George?s cousins included U. S. President Zachary Taylor and Sarah Knox Davis, the wife of Confederate President Jefferson Davis. 
Gaines, Captain James Taylor Sr (I272008484072)
 
135

Harry T. Abernathy was born in Leavenworth, Kansas, May 23, 1865, the son of Col. James L. Abernathy, the pioneer furniture manufacturer of the West.
Harry came to Kansas City and became cashier of the company. He held the position for eight years, and in 1895 was given the place of assistant cashier of the First National Bank. He was the treasurer of Park College for four years.
He was married in 1890 to Miss Stevenson, of Leavenworth, and they had three children, two boys and a girl.

Harry's father Mr. Abernathy had taken a strong attitude against the pro-slavery factions and had voted for Abraham Lincoln. It is believed that he recruited the second Kansas company for the war and later he was commissioned captain of Company K Eighth Kansas Volunteer Infantry, and was in command of his company on its forced march from Fort Scott, in the dead of winter, to the beleagued, isolated post of Fort Kearney, in Western Nebraska. Still later he served all through the Cumberland Valley campaign, and was a participant in the Battle of Chickamauga. When peace was declared he laid aside the sword and again resumed the peaceful pursuits of commerce at Leavenworth.

While his brother was serving his country, William Abernathy had become interested in a wholesale and retail furniture business at Kansas City, under the firm name of Woods & Abernathy, and Colonel Abernathy became connected with this concern, and in 1869, upon his brother's death, succeeded to his interest. About this time he also became associated in the firm of Abernathy, North & Orrison, and later, as a silent partner, in its successor, the firm of North, Orrison & Co. For business reasons, and to separate the wholesale from the retail trade, other affiliated concerns grew up, such as the J. H. North Furniture & Carpet Company, and its successor, the Duff & Repp Furniture Company. The manufacturing and jobbing departments at Leavenworth, in the meantime, had grown to gigantic proportions and expansion continued.

Colonel Abernathy was active and seemingly untiring in many directions. He was gifted with a keen business acumen which was the potent reason for the wonderful success that attended his various investments. As time passed he became connected with numerous enterprises at Leavenworth. His abundant, tireless energy prevented him from taking life easy and found relief in many useful ways. In 1886 he was one of the organizers of the First National Bank of Kansas City, of which he was director, vice president and president. He served as mayor of Leavenworth for three years, having been elected in 1873, on the citizens' ticket. As a commissioner of the metropolitan police board, by appointment of Governor Humphrey, he was one of the first to attempt the enforcement of the new prohibition liquor laws. He was interested financially, officially or otherwise, in many enterprises in and about Leavenworth, all contributive to her growth and progress and to the furthering of her good name, of which he was jealously proud. After the close of the Civil war he was one of the commissioners named to locate the Kansas soldier's monument in Chickamauga Park.

In 1859 Colonel Abernathy was married to Elizabeth Martin, and a family of six children was born to them, namely: Frank, who died in infancy; William M., Walter L., Harry T., Omar and Cora, who is the wife of Dr. A. G. Hull. Colonel Abernathy died December 16, 1902 
Abernathy, Harry Thomas (I12660561095)
 
136

I find a Peleg THORNTON and a Almera THORNTON in the 1870 Census Berkshire, Tioga, New York. This in NOT parley and Almira. This is truly Peleg THORNTON and his wife Almira. They are buried in the Evergreen Cemetery in Tioga County, New York. I find them in the 1850 Census Cincinnatus, Cortland, New York with many of their children.  
Unknown, Almira DD (I520005742)
 
137

I N S C R I P T I O N S
ON THE TOMBSTONES IN THE
O L D B U R Y I N G G R O U ND
NEAR THE CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH AT
H A R W I N T O N, C O N N E C T I C UT


George son of Capt William C and A z u b a h A-bernethy
died July 2 1805 Aged 11 years 7 months 
Abernethy, George (I1808647983)
 
138

I N S C R I P T I O N S
ON THE TOMBSTONES IN THE
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NEAR THE CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH AT
H A R W I N T O N, C O N N E C T I C UT


In memory of Andrew son of Dr William & Mrs
Honour A b e r n ethy who Died June y e 2d 1782 in
ye 7th y e a r of his age
In sable tooni my Christ our Sav
Dear my babe iour conies again
From trouble here to raise our bodi
Securely rest till es from the Dust 
Abernethy, Andrew (I1808647940)
 
139

I N S C R I P T I O N S
ON THE TOMBSTONES IN THE
O L D B U R Y I N G G R O U ND
NEAR THE CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH AT
H A R W I N T O N, C O N N E C T I C UT

Erected to the memory of Doctr William Abernethy
who died Novr 26th 1802 A g e d 68 years
How lov'd how valued once avails the not
Erected to the memory of Mrs Honor Abernethy
Relic of Doct William Abernethy who died Sept 14
1811 Aged 66 years 
Abernethy, Doctor William Gaylord (I1191199066)
 
140

I N S C R I P T I O N S
ON THE TOMBSTONES IN THE
O L D B U R Y I N G G R O U ND
NEAR THE CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH AT
H A R W I N T O N, C O N N E C T I C UT

Harris son of Doctr Wm & Mrs Honour Abern-ethy
died ( the) 12 of Feby 1788
 
Abernethy, Harris (I1808647945)
 
141

I N S C R I P T I O N S
ON THE TOMBSTONES IN THE
O L D B U R Y I N G G R O U ND
NEAR THE CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH AT
H A R W I N T O N, C O N N E C T I C UT

In memory of Mrs Phebe late consort of Mr V7m
Conant Abernethy who died May 18 1799 with the
small P o x in the 24th year of her A g e & their in-fant
son W m Aged 18 hours 
Abernethy, William (I3027523349)
 
142

I N S C R I P T I O N S
ON THE TOMBSTONES IN THE
O L D B U R Y I N G G R O U ND
NEAR THE CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH AT
H A R W I N T O N, C O N N E C T I C UT

In memory of Mrs Phebe late consort of Mr V7m
Conant Abernethy who died May 18 1799 with the
small P o x in the 24th year of her A g e & their in-fant
son W m Aged r8 hours 
Whord or Wiard, Phebe (I1808647948)
 
143

In Which a Boy Named Patrick Ramsey is Bound to Robert Abernathy
3 December, 1661, Charles City Co., VA

p.302. Att a Co'rt holden att Westov'r December 3, 1661...

p. 309. Abstract. The court, with consent of Martha the relict of David Ramsey decd, binds Elizab: dau of sd Ramsey to Mr James Wallace to serve till she be 16. The like ordered for her son Patrick Ramsey bound to Robert Abernathy till 21.

Fleet, Beverly, Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Volume III, p. 255 (Charles City County Court Orders, 1655-1657): 1988 Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, Maryland, originally published in 1937 and 1949 by mimeograph. Reproduced on Family Archive CD #503 (Genealogical Records: Colonial Virginia Records, 1600s-1700s).

Transcribed by Margaret Ogilvie 
Abernathy, Robert I (I543657046)
 
144

In Which Robert Abernathie is Paid for Five Days Work
9 November 1657

At a Co'rt held at mer'chts hope 9ber. 18: 1657...Ordered that 47 lb tobbo per pol be forthw'th levied and recd by the sherr of every tytheable person in this Com and payd as fol vidzt...

Robert Abernathie for 5 dayes worke 050

[This was the least amount paid of any of 33 people listed, other amounts mostly around 400, and the highest being 2650.]



Fleet, Beverly, Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Volume III, p. 189 (Charles City County Court Orders, 1655-1657): 1988 Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, Maryland, originally published in 1937 and 1949 by mimeograph. Reproduced on Family Archive CD #503 (Genealogical Records: Colonial Virginia Records, 1600s-1700s).

Transcribed by Margaret Ogilvie

 
Abernathy, Robert I (I543657046)
 
145

In Which Robert Abernathy Produced an Invoice to the Estate of George Armstrong
21 Apr 1656, Charles City Co., VA

Att a Cor?t holden at Westov?r April 21, 1656...

p. 53. Whereas Robt. Abernathy hath produced and proved an acc?t of
disbursemts and also charges for Geo. Armstrong dec'd amount? 1258 lbs. Tob. wch he hath paid and ingaged for; Itt is therefore ordered that Andrew Armstrong adm?r of the sayd George shall pay or secure the sd sume to the to the sd Abernathie before removeall of the sd Deced?dts estate, als exec.

Fleet, Beverly, Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Volume III, p. 165 (Charles City County Court Orders, 1655-1657): 1988 Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, Maryland, originally published in 1937 and 1949 by mimeograph. Reproduced on Family Archive CD #503 (Genealogical Records: Colonial Virginia Records, 1600s-1700s).

Transcribed by Margaret Ogilvie 
Abernathy, Robert I (I543657046)
 
146

In Which Robert Abernathy Serves on a Jury
13 March 1662/3, Charles City Co., VA

p.383 A Jury of Inquest impanelled the 13th of March 1662 to deliv'r their opinion concerning the death of a man belonging to mr Theoderick Bland, Esqr, who was drowned and taken up a mer'chts hope: Mr James Blamor foreman, Mr Ricd Dodd, Mr Tho" Holford, Mr Edd Ames, Mr Rowland Jones, Tho: Cuerton, Mr James Wallis, Geo: Mayden, Mr Tho; Douglas, Rbt Abernathy, Mr Patrick Jackson. We of the Jury do unanimously agree and give our verdict that the oxe standing upright in the boate with striveling pulled out of the thofts of the boate and splitt her, and by that meanes the man was drowned.

Fleet, Beverly, Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Volume III, p. 276 (Charles City County Court Orders, 1661-1664): 1988 Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, Maryland, originally published in 1937 and 1949 by mimeograph. Reproduced on Family Archive CD #503 (Genealogical Records: Colonial Virginia Records, 1600s-1700s).

Transcribed by Margaret Ogilvie 
Abernathy, Robert I (I543657046)
 
147

Inscription:
Aged 68yrs, 9ms & 3ds 
Washburn, Nicholas Laycock (I545062372)
 
148

James P.C. Davis Will

State of North Carolina

Wilkes County

Know all men by these presents I Jas. P.C. Davis of the County and State aforesaid being week in body and sound in mind do make this my last Will & Testament. First a decent burial according to the Custom of the Country.

2nd all my just debts to be paid out of my present crop of brandy.

Lastly I give all of my Land that I now live on and all my present property of what soever kind to my beloved wife Martha M. Davis during her life or widowhood at her death if there is anything left it shall be sold and equally divided among my lawful heirs of my body.

I hereby appoint my wife Martha M. Davis and Solomon Davis as executrix and executor of this my last will and testament in witness whereunto I have hereby set my hand and seal in the presents of his witnesses this Oct 24th 1864.

Witness Howell Baker Jas P.C. Davis seal

Alexander Gilreath

North Carolina

Wilkes County Nov Term 1864

The execution of the within Will was duly proven in open court by the Wit of Alexander Gilreath one of the subscribing witnesses (garbled) and order to be recorded and the executrix and executor (garbled) and duly qualified.

N.A. Foster clk

I.S. Call
 
Davis, James Partee Clingman (I53)
 
149

James Wallace Receives Satisfaction from Robert Abernathy Regarding Cattle and a Gun
3 April 1665, Charles City Co., VA

p. 540. Abstract. A Court at Westover 3 April 1665?

p. 545 These presents Witness that I James Wallace have received full satisfaccon from Robt Abernathy of the cattle that he had in his custody perteyning to the Orphane Patrick Ramsey as also the gun for w?ch I do dicharg the sd Abernathy Witness my hand this 18th of Febry 1664. James Wallace. Teste Patrick Jackson. Rec 12 die Aprs 1665

Fleet, Beverly, Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Volume III, p. 320 (Charles City County Court Orders, 1655-1657): 1988 Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, Maryland, originally published in 1937 and 1949 by mimeograph. Reproduced on Family Archive CD #503 (Genealogical Records: Colonial Virginia Records, 1600s-1700s).

Transcribed by Margaret Ogilvie 
Abernathy, Robert I (I543657046)
 
150

Jay Allen Eby, 75, of Kelso passed away July 28, 2012, at home.

Born in Cowlitz County to Eugene Leroy and Lois Jean (Mason) Eby Oct. 31, 1936, Jay lived in the Kelso-Longview area for all but two years of his life. Jay's mother died when he was 3 years old. His father later married Hope Hudson. Jay graduated from Kelso High School in 1955.

Jay married Patricia Eisele in 1955, they had four children and later divorced. He then married Phyllis Burch in 1976. She died in 1995. Jay and Cheryl (Wheeler) Warren were married in Reno April 17, 1998, and together they raised her three children.

Over the course of his working life, Jay was a choker setter, welder, millwright and lubrication specialist. He retired from NorPac in 2002. Upon retiring, Jay took up powder coating motorcycles as a hobby. Those who knew Jay all agree: He loved motorcycles! Memories of him will always be associated with tinkering in the garage or shop, never without a motorcycle restoration project. He also enjoyed watching basketball and never tired of watching his favorite movies.

Formerly a dog person, Jay became a cat lover when Coalie and Lucy came into his life many years ago. His constant companion, Suzy Q, was given to him as a 74th birthday surprise by his wife, Cheryl and granddaughter, Kaitlyn Marie Holcomb.

Jay is survived by his wife, Cheryl; four children, Joni Kim (Eby) Smith of Battle Ground, Kevin Eugene Eby of Bozeman, Mont., Monte Allen Eby of Ariel and Teresa Rene (Eby-Gansler) Derochowski of McMinnville, Ore.; five stepchildren, Steve Pierson of Castle Rock, Kara Farmer of Longview, Jacob Richardson of Eugene, Samantha Warren of Kelso and Jesse Warren of Longview; a brother, Dallas Eby of Longview; a sister, Linda Medack of Kelso; 21 grandchildren; seven great-grandchildren plus two due to arrive in August; and Suzy Q.

He was deeply loved and will be greatly missed.

Jay was preceded in death by his parents and a stepson, Kevin Pierson.

A funeral service is planned for 11 a.m. Friday at Steele Chapel. A viewing is planned from 9 a.m. until service time. Private interment will take place at Longview Memorial Park.
 
Eby, Jay (I272008474947)
 

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